Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware

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Re: Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware

If you set the modem to run in Bridge mode, the router will have to run in full router mode.  On newer routers there is usually a mode selection of Router, Access Point or Bridge mode. 

 

In router mode, the router acts as the firewall, DHCP server and wired and wifi access point.  The modem should be running in Bridge mode to avoid a double NAT situation which can cause problems for devices connected to the router.

 

In Access point mode, the router DHCP is probably disabled automatically as is the firewall.  The modem will be operating in Gateway mode, providing the firewall and DHCP server. 

 

In Bridge mode, the router acts as the last half of a wifi bridge, to which you connect ethernet devices.  The DHCP server and firewall probably disable automatically when you select the router's Bridge mode.  The modem operates in Gateway mode with the wifi running, providing the first half of the wifi bridge,  and providing the firewall and DHCP server for the entire network.  This operating mode would be selected if the modem was parked at a location that was less than ideal for example, while your ethernet devices are parked elsewhere in the home.  In lieu of a powerline connection, or snaking an ethernet cable from one location to the other to provide the data path back to the modem, a wifi bridge is used in its place. 



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Re: Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware

@Mike2011 Your signal levels looks fine, give it a couple days and see if things improve with your issues.

Rogers is doing A LOT of changes in the back end right now, so give it time, things will improve.

 



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Re: Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware

my Linksys EA4500 has options of:
Automatic Configuration-DHCP
Static IP
PPPoE
PPTP
L2TP
Bridge Mode
i have it set to Auto Config DHCP but not sure if this is correct? & Hitron is set to Bridge
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Re: Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware

You have the correct setting.

Make sure you have the Ethernet cable plugged into the WAN port of the Linksys.

Start with a fresh boot of both devices, pull the plug wait a bit and then plug in the CODA and wait for it to finish booting and syncing. Then power on the Linksys and it should grab an IP from the modem.
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Posts: 108

Re: Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware

If you haven't done it lately, update the firmware of your Linksys when you get this working.

http://www.linksys.com/us/support-article?articleNum=148385

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Posts: 11

Re: Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware

thanks i was unsure because it doesn't seem near as fast now as it was without the router but i need it for the aquarium server
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Re: Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware

firmware is up to date
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Re: Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware

@JMAC2, here's a simple test you can do to check the difference in performance, modem versus router. 

 

Run a speedtest using the www.speedtest.net Toronto Rogers or Montreal Rogers server.  Run that speedtest thru the router to an ethernet connected pc.  Then disconnect the pc from the router, plug it into one of the modem ports and reboot the pc.  After the reboot, open a web browser and navigate to ipv6-test.com   That site will test for both IPV4 and IPV6 addresses and capability.  The CODA-4582 currently has its IPV6 disabled, so you should end up with a score of 4/20 for an IPV4 addresss.  Run the same speedtest. 

 

I think you will find that the router limits your data rate simply due to the processor capability.  What you decide to do will depend on the differences in the data rates that you see.  You could run a factory reset on the router and disable everything but the firewall and DHCP to see what affect, if any, that any of the router functions are having on the throughput.  Anything like traffic monitoring, QOS, etc will slow that throughput, perhaps more than you might be content with.  It might be time to park the linksys and buy another router with a faster processor and with external antenna. 



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Posts: 11

Re: Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware

@Datalink what would u recommend for a new router & thanks for the advice
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Re: Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware

@JMAC2, thats a loaded question these days.  It depends on whether your satisfied with the linksys router for wifi purposes, or if you're looking to replace the linksys for a typical consumer all in one router.  

My personal opinion these days is to consider something like a PfSense, Opensense type of router that you can build yourself and load with that software.  Using that approach, you can use a processor that operates at something higher than 2 Ghz which will give you enough horsepower to run comfortably at 900+ Mb/s and run packet scans and others without suffering a huge throughput drop.  I think security should be a primary concern, which includes IP address checking, blacklist/whitelist checks, packet scans and others, and that can take some computing power to accomplish.  If you're satisfied with the wifi performance of the linksys router, and that also brings the wifi devices into the discussion, then this might be worth considering.  

There is also something like a MikroTik or already built PfSense router to consider.  I've never used either but, apparently the MikroTik has a bit of a learning curve to it.  That is probably the same to some degree for others such as PfSense, OpenSense, Sophos etc.

On the consumer router side, if you're looking for an all in one, wifi router, I don't think there is a router on the market that can keep up with 900+ Mb/s and provide a moderate to high level of security at the same time.  If you're going to go down this road, look for a router that has at least a 1.4 or 1.7 Ghz processor or greater if and when they become available.  The fastest that I've seen so far is a 1.7 Ghz processor.  There may be faster processors in routers now, but I haven't been looking around recently.  It seems that the emphasis these days is on wifi performance including the newer Multi-User MIMO routers which can broadcast to a group of 4 devices at the same time, with single responses back to the router.  The end result is a greater download capability, but, the kicker is that the end devices also have to be capable of MU-MIMO and I suspect that its going to take a few years to get to a point where that is typical of all devices.  So, the marketing is aimed at wifi go fast claims and very very little is said about data rates + security.  So, that is something to watch for. 

In terms of the consumer routers, my preference is Asus, mainly due to the firmware updates and availability of Merlin's AsusWRT which I haven't tried yet.  One of these days.....  I run an Asus RT-AC68U which is underpowered now for gigabit rates although I've seen well over 900 Mb/s thru that router.  Its a great router, has been rock solid since day one and I would absolutely recommend one for anyone running on a lower ISP data rate.  There is an update to that router, the RT-AC1900P which has a 1.4 Ghz processor versus the 800 Mhz processor in the 68U.  IPV4 performance thru the 68U is acceptable, IPV6 takes a beating when the AI Protection is enabled for packet scans.  That gets back to the security aspect.  A faster processor would probably help, I'm not sure at this point how much the IPV6 performance would improve.  

If you look at all of the consumer routers in the market and do any digging you will see that all manufacturers have issues with router operation or security.  Asus is under a 20 year order for inspections to ensure that its firmware provides the end users with a secure product.  Netgear filters IPV6 ICMP which is required to run IPV6, so, I wouldn't consider a Netgear router.  Other manufactures don't provide timely firmware updates.  So, part of the search for a new router should be to consider if third party firmware is also available such as DD-WRT, Merlins AsusWRT, Xwrt-vortex (AsusWRT for the Netgear R7000 and others).  That allows you to get around issues like Netgears IPV6 filtering and issues that you might come across with other routers.  

So, as I said at the beginning, its a loaded question.  Consider what the goal is, replace the Linksys entirely, or use it in conjunction with a much faster wired router.  Whats the priority, wired or wifi, or are they both equal and how much does security factor into the decision?  Keep an open mind and look at typical consumer and not so typical routers.  Consider Ubiquity Edgerouters as well.  I'm sure that there are members on the forum that run ubiqutiy equipment, both Edgerouters and wifi access points.  The Edgerouters will also have a learning curve to climb, so, time and patience will be required.  

Hope this doesn't muddy the water too much.