CODA-4582 - Open Issues for Investigation

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Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 1,066

Re: CODA-4582 - Open Issues for Investigation

@VivienM


@VivienM wrote:

@Telek wrote:

@Datalink wrote:

@VivienM will hopefully be able to tell you if the card can be replaced without any issues from bios white listing. 


The bios whitelisting is mainly because not all devices are made equally. The antennas in the laptop might not work with other devices, leading to damaging the device or just poor wifi performance.

 

Primarily though, you need to stick to what the original card was designed for. If it's a 2.4GHz only card, then you won't be able to use a 5GHz card in there.

 

Because of that, there's really little point to replacing it. If the card already handles 2.4 b/g/n, then that's about the best that you're going to be able to get internally anyway. You might be able to replace it with a card that gets slightly better performance, but that's probably not worth it.


Huh? The BIOS whitelisting is because HP/Lenovo take the view that FCC and other regulatory agencies' radio requirements require the laptops not to have 'unknown' radio emitting devices that might exceed the regulatory standards. Dell/Acer/Asus/etc clearly interpret the relevant regulations differently.

 

I've upgraded wifi cards on many laptops, and I can assure you that what you've said is wrong. Looking at laptops that I have right now:

- Dell L502x, came with an Intel 6230 (dual-band 802.11n), upgraded to a 7260 (802.11ac), works fine at AC speeds

- Dell L702x, came with an Intel 1030 (single-band 802.11n) (bought this used, otherwise I would have ordered the 6230), upgraded to a 7260 (802.11ac), works fine at 5GHz and AC

- Acer 1830T, came with something non-Intel single-band 802.11n, upgraded to a 7260 (802.11ac), works fine on 5GHz and AC

- Dell E6420, came with an Intel 6205 (dual-band 802.11n but without bluetooth), upgraded to a 7260 (802.11ac), works fine at AC speeds. The only 'issues' had to do with the laptop now having two bluetooth adapters which Windows doesn't love...

 

The only issues I've had were with 'sketchy' cards bought on eBay; if you want a 7260AC Intel card, though, brand new ones can be found at respectable computer shops...

 

More importantly, with MANY laptops, the manufacturers themselves offer multiple wifi card options. The antennas/BIOSes/etc are not different whether you pick one card or another; all that's different is what card is placed in the mini-PCIe slot.


I gotta agree, I've upgraded my work laptop (Lenovo T430i) to an Intel 7260 with 5Ghz AC, no issues at all. 



I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Re: CODA-4582 - Open Issues for Investigation

Interestingly looks good now?  And yes, would like to have IPV6 if possible.  We have 3 teens and a couple Xbox One S etc units - apparently useful for this I was told.  These two are on a PC with ethernet.

Speed1.jpg

Speed2.bmpThe family room xbox one s runs ethernet cable but only hits this:

 

Wired

IPV4

Nat: moderate

 

Download: 243.11 Mbps

Upload: 22.07 Mbps

Packet loss: 0%

MTU: 1480

Latency: 73 ms

 

 

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 154

Re: CODA-4582 - Open Issues for Investigation


@VivienM wrote:

I've upgraded wifi cards on many laptops, and I can assure you that what you've said is wrong.

Just because it has worked for you, doesn't mean that what I said is wrong. Read what I have said carefully. Search for yourself "2.4 vs 5 GHz antennas" to see what I'm talking about.

 


@VivienM wrote:

More importantly, with MANY laptops, the manufacturers themselves offer multiple wifi card options.


Correct. In the cases where the manufacturer offers a 5GHz option, and doesn't use different antennas, there's a very good chance that the antennas in the laptop are hybrid and can handle both 2.4 and 5GHz radios.

Emphasis on chance. There is no guarantee. If the laptop is old, it almost certainly does not have them. Trust me, I've been around the block on this. I have upgraded old laptops when 5GHz first came out, and received both burnt out radios and poor performance.

If the laptop came with a 5GHz option, as a previous poster suggested, simply eBay the replacement radio and do a drop-in replacement. You're not guaranteed that it'll work, but there's a very good chance. Ensure that you look at the antenna leads carefully though, as sometimes they are marked separately (implying that they are, in fact, different).

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 154

Re: CODA-4582 - Open Issues for Investigation


@the-wrangler wrote:

Interestingly looks good now?  And yes, would like to have IPV6 if possible.  We have 3 teens and a couple Xbox One S etc units - apparently useful for this I was told.  These two are on a PC with ethernet.


You might want to double check that -- actually many people are complaining of games which do not work on IPV6 (especially PvP) because there's still no real bridging between IPV6 clients and IPV4 clients.  I.e. if you're connected to their server on IPV6, you likely won't be able to play against anyone who is still on IPV4.

 

Do you currently have any problems with the xbox setup? If not, and it ain't broke... Smiley Happy

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,012

Re: CODA-4582 - Open Issues for Investigation

@the-wrangler, assuming that your modem is running in Gateway mode, log into the modem and have a look at the upper right hand corner of the data block on the STATUS tab.  That is the WAN IP address block.  The modem should be running IPV6, so, you should see a normal looking IPV4 address, and longer, multi character IPV6 address right beside it.  That will tell you that the modem has an IPV6 address and therefore, the attached LAN devices should also have an IPV6 address.  

 

For the PC, go to ipv6-test.com   That site will test IPV4 and IPV6 connectivity to the PC.  The score is shown on the upper right hand corner.  For IPV4 operation only, you will see 4/20, for "close to" IPV6 operation you will see 17/20.  If so, you need to add an IPV6 ICMP rule to the Windows Firewall rules.  A score of 19/20 shows that the pc has full connectivity with IPV6.  

 

You can also run an IPV6 trace to an end target:  tracert -6 www.google.com

That trace should run all the way to google, without timing out along the way.  

 

For XBox operation, the presence of an IPV6 address does not guarantee IPV6 operation, and in fact, there are some games which do not like running when IPV6 is in operation.  The Xbox will decide which path to use on its own.  That could be IPV4, IPV6 or Teredo.  I haven't seen anything in any Microsoft staff presentations which indicates a method of forcing IPV6 use if that is what you want to do.  Just keep in mind, that if you have an IPV6 address on the modem, then there is a very good chance, not guaranteed, that the XBox is running on IPV6.  And if the XBox is in fact running on IPV6, then its possible that the user will not be able to find a match as a result.  That has been noted here in the forum in another thread, possibly even this thread on an earlier day.  If that is the case, then you would want to disable IPV6 in the modem and reboot the modem.  Rebooting the connected devices probably wouldn't be a bad idea either.  



Resident Expert
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Posts: 928

Re: CODA-4582 - Open Issues for Investigation


@Telek wrote:

@VivienM wrote:

I've upgraded wifi cards on many laptops, and I can assure you that what you've said is wrong.

Just because it has worked for you, doesn't mean that what I said is wrong. Read what I have said carefully. Search for yourself "2.4 vs 5 GHz antennas" to see what I'm talking about.

 


@VivienM wrote:

More importantly, with MANY laptops, the manufacturers themselves offer multiple wifi card options.


Correct. In the cases where the manufacturer offers a 5GHz option, and doesn't use different antennas, there's a very good chance that the antennas in the laptop are hybrid and can handle both 2.4 and 5GHz radios.

Emphasis on chance. There is no guarantee. If the laptop is old, it almost certainly does not have them. Trust me, I've been around the block on this. I have upgraded old laptops when 5GHz first came out, and received both burnt out radios and poor performance.

If the laptop came with a 5GHz option, as a previous poster suggested, simply eBay the replacement radio and do a drop-in replacement. You're not guaranteed that it'll work, but there's a very good chance. Ensure that you look at the antenna leads carefully though, as sometimes they are marked separately (implying that they are, in fact, different).


That was also me suggesting eBaying the 5GHz option, in the scenario where you have a BIOS whitelist. If you don't have a BIOS whitelist, I'd just get an Intel 7260...

 

I don't know what you mean by 'old'. We're talking mini PCIe cards here, and I want to say that mPCIe dates back to... maybe 2007-2008? By that point, 5GHz wifi was a well-established standard - indeed, I would argue that dual-band cards were probably MORE common in 2006-2008. There was a brief period in time when a lot of devices (including low-end ones) had 802.11a/b/g cards and then 802.11a/b/g/draft-n cards. My memory could be wrong, but I don't think Intel made a 2.4-only card between the 2215BG in 2005 until the 1000/1030 in 2011, which was presumably introduced as the value of the 'Centrino' brand was shrinking and in response to every cheap PC manufacturer throwing in cheap Realtek/Broadcom/Ralink/etc single-band single-stream 802.11n cards. Then the trend of cheap single-band wifi in consumer-grade Windows laptops has continued more or less until now, though 5GHz-only 802.11ac has probably caused a mild-uptake in dual-band devices.

 

I don't know what to tell you. I've upgraded wifi cards in... 5-6?... laptops with no BIOS whitelists with no problems, including the four current laptops I listed in my earlier post. The fellow who first alerted me to the idea probably upgraded wifi cards in 10+ laptops, with no problems other than weird issues with AMD processors/chipsets and Intel wifi cards, IIRC. Nothing fried, certainly.

 

The one big antenna issue I've come across is the 3-stream issue; if you want to put in a 3-stream card like an Intel 5300/6300, you need 3 antennas, which is usually the case in business laptops that offered those cards as an option, but most other laptops only have 2 antennas. I believe some people have added a third antenna; that's too much surgery for me. And that point seems to have become moot anyways since 3-stream 802.11ac cards are insanely rare in Windowsland...

 

And I did just google your suggested search string - nothing talking about internal wifi antennas. Maybe there's just been a norm for 10+ years to use antennas that can do both 5GHz/2.4GHz no matter what cards are in the laptops...



I'm Here A Lot
Posts: 7

Re: CODA-4582 - Open Issues for Investigation

I don't know what is going on with this coda-4582, but I just keep disconecting every 10-15 seconds for the past two hours now. This is not acceptable. 

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I've Been Around
Posts: 1

Re: CODA-4582 - Open Issues for Investigation

When with the guest access issue be fixed? 

I'm a Reliable Contributor
Posts: 602

Re: CODA-4582 - Open Issues for Investigation

Good Afternoon Community, 

 

@RogersDave

 

I have not checked in for a little while, I was wondering what you guys were working on the next firmware update?

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 154

Re: CODA-4582 - Open Issues for Investigation

@JohnBeaudin

 

AFAIK this is the latest, as Dave posted last week.

 


@RogersDave wrote:

Took note and reported the following to Hitron:

 

  • DDNS issue with freedns.afraid.org
  • Guest network is still behaving incorrectly in some cases with 2.0.10.27
  • Request to increase MAC address reservation limit

 

Dave