Rogers Ignite Gigabit Very... very Slow Speeds

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 15

Re: Rogers Ignite Gigabit Very... very Slow Speeds

Problem is on both Wired via Ethernet and WI-fi as well. I am getting only 100 Mbps when connected via Ethernet.

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Re: Rogers Ignite Gigabit Very... very Slow Speeds

Ok, for the ethernet connection, can you look at the back of the modem, specifically the connected port LED.  Flashing amber indicates a 1 Gb/s connection with the connected device.  Flashing green indicates a 10/100 Mb/s connection with the device.   There are numerous causes for a 100 Mb/s connection, including the device port itself, which may be limited to 100 Mb/s.  

 

For the wifi issue, can you have a look at the following post, specifically the wifi settings and applications to check out your wifi environment to see whom you're competing with for clear channels. 

 

https://communityforums.rogers.com/t5/Internet/slow-wifi/m-p/429489#M54216

 

If you haven't done to already, you should check out the specs for the wifi adapter in your pc or laptop, just to see what the max data rate happens to be. 

 

 



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 15

Re: Rogers Ignite Gigabit Very... very Slow Speeds

It is flashing green  when connected via Ethernet cable

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Posts: 6,291

Re: Rogers Ignite Gigabit Very... very Slow Speeds

Ok, that means that the maximum data rate that you will see via ethernet is 100 Mb/s.  On a speed test, that probably will result in somewhere around 94 to 96 Mb/s.  It might be a little higher but not much.  

 

So, at this point you need to know if the device has a gigabit ethernet port, or if it only runs at 100 Mb/s.  If you go to the Control Panel ..... Device Manager, drill down to the Network Adapters and expand that item to show all of the sub-components listed under the Network Adapters.  There should be an entry title "xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxx Ethernet Controller".  Copy that entire sub-component ID line and paste that into a google search.  You should be able to find that controller and determine its specified maximum data rate, 100 Mb/s or 1 Gb/s.

 

If you already know that the network adapter is a gigabit adapter and you've already seen it run higher data rates at another location or with a different modem at your home, there's a few possibilities:

 

1. The network adapter settings are limiting the maximum data rate.  In this case you have to drill down to the adapter advanced settings and determine what the max data rate is set for.  Some manufacturers only show an "Auto" setting, followed by lower settings, so its never clear what the max data rate happens to be, but, it will usually increase as follows:  10 Mb/s, 100 Mb/s, 1000 Mb/s, with Auto meaning either 100 Mb/s or 1000 Mb/s depending on the age of the motherboard.  You should ensure that the setting is either at 1000 Mb/s, or Auto.  If it only shows 10 Mb/s, 100 Mb/s, Auto, then its worth doing a google search to determine the maximum data rate of the network adatper.

 

2.  The ethernet cable isn't providing the proper contact between the cable pings and the port pins, at one or at both ends.  Try another cable that you know will run at 1 Gb/s.

 

3.  The ethernet cable is damaged in some fashion and only has two wire pairs running internally instead of all four.  Once again, try another cable that you know will run at 1 Gb/s.

 

4.  You're using a "FAST" ethernet cable, which is an old cable which many people still have around their home.  That cable only supports 100 Mb/s.  At one point in time, it probably was a fast cable, but, by todays standards, it isn't.  Switch to another cable that you know will run at 1 Gb/s.

 

 

When you connect a device with a gigabit port to the modem, that modem port LED should flash amber, indicating a 1 Gb/s connection rate.  You don't have to do anything, the two ports will negotiate the data rate that enables them to run at the highest data rate,whatever that turns out to be.  Connected at 1 Gb/s that data rate makes use of all 4 wire pairs within the ethernet cable.  Only 2 pairs out of the 4 pairs within the ethernet cable are required to support 100 Mb/s and below.  

 

Ok, hope this helps.  It will come down to one of those possibilities, the max designed data rate for the adapter, the current max data rate setting in the advanced settings, or the cable and its connectors. 

 

Are you connecting a pc or laptop directly to the modem with a commercially produced cable, or are you using house ethernet wiring to connect to the modem, or using some other path such as a powerline or MoCA adapter?

 

Note that the same situation can exist with the Wifi adapter, in terms of its designed max data rate and its current max data rate setting in the advanced settings.

 

We have run into situations in the past where customers have upgraded their internet plan, moving to higher data rates, only to discover that their devices only support 100 Mb/s.  That takes a little homework to determine the data rate capabilities of all of your devices. 



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 15

Re: Rogers Ignite Gigabit Very... very Slow Speeds

I connected to my work Laptop which I use at my work and it gets 1.5 gb speed. I tested and my laptop is capable and this device is new one

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 15

Re: Rogers Ignite Gigabit Very... very Slow Speeds

I am directly connecting to Rogers Router using Cat 6e cable
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 15

Re: Rogers Ignite Gigabit Very... very Slow Speeds

Previously I used Bell Gigabit internet on same device and I used to get 900 mbps speed and no issues. Now during the week days I am getting upto 150 mbps(some times) and some times below 100 mbps . During the weekend from friday evening it slows down too much until sunday and getting only 60 to 70 mbps.

 

I am planning to switch back to Bell again as this is not worth

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 15

Re: Rogers Ignite Gigabit Very... very Slow Speeds

I checked my network controller and it set to 1 Gbps full Duplex as well.

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Posts: 6,291

Re: Rogers Ignite Gigabit Very... very Slow Speeds

Hmm, it should work but it doesn't.  Only things that I can think of is:

 

1.  Have a carefull look at the ethernet cable that your using.  Check the pins at both ends and look for any damage to the cable itself.  If you were getting 900 Mb/s, via ethernet with Bell's HH3000, then you should be able to do the same with the CODA-4582 modem.  Just to check, that's the only white modem that Rogers uses.  Is that the modem that you have?  Given the signal levels that you posted, that is the modem that you should have, unless I missed a modem swap between yesterday and now.  

 

2.   Call tech support and ask the tech to ensure that the modem is provisioned for the internet plan that you have (gigabit service ??).  Indicate that you're never able to achieve anywhere near the plan's data rate. 

 

3.  Ask the tech to run a signal check on the modem and ask specifically if the modem's OFDM downstream channel is within specs.  The user interface does not show all of the signal data unfortunately, but, tech support has access to those numbers. 

 

4.  For a windows pc or laptop, delete any existing LAN profiles.  Windows will rebuilt the profile as required.  

 

If you were running Bell's fibre optic service before, why switch to cable with any provider?  Just curious.....



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 15

Re: Rogers Ignite Gigabit Very... very Slow Speeds

I got the promotional offer from Rogers which Bell did not matched. That was my mistake which I switched. Now I am trying to switch back