Let's talk Upstream Bandwidth

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 69

Re: Let's talk Upstream Bandwidth

All this talk about download speeds is confusing. Your download speed depends on what the other ends maximum upload speed is divided by the number of people using that same server/link (some servers have multiple links, and some have bandwidth caps). Given that generally you don’t know what the servers upload speed is, or how many people are using it, there is no way to tell what real world download speed you will get.

The point of Gigabit download speed is to make sure that your download speed is not the bottleneck. It also allows multiple people (or processes on the same computer) to download at max speed (whatever it may be) - assuming they are not all downloading from the same server.

The only real way to tell if you are getting Gigabit download speeds, is to test against a Speedtest server (which generally has Gigabit upload speed ), is within the Rogers network, and is close by (ie a few kilometers). Rogers can’t control what happens outside their network, and servers more than a few km away (say on the mainland, or Europe, or another city) will be sharing bandwidth with everyone else in between.

If I test my download speed against the Rogers Speedtest server in my city, I get 950Mbps, but another server in a nearby city will give 750Mbps. That’s not Rogers fault. That’s just the way the internet works.

I would like to see faster upload speeds though, as 1000/30 is too much of an imbalance, and I do upload a lot to cloud backup services/teleconferencing/just stuff. 1000/100 would seem reasonable to me, seeing as I went from 250/20, to 1000/30, ie 4x download speed, but only a small increase on upload speed (relatively speaking).

This will be driven by marketing though, not technology. We will get what we demand, and Rogers will charge what they can get.

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 1,086

Re: Let's talk Upstream Bandwidth


@Nick_W wrote:

All this talk about download speeds is confusing. Your download speed depends on what the other ends maximum upload speed is divided by the number of people using that same server/link (some servers have multiple links, and some have bandwidth caps). Given that generally you don’t know what the servers upload speed is, or how many people are using it, there is no way to tell what real world download speed you will get.

The point of Gigabit download speed is to make sure that your download speed is not the bottleneck. It also allows multiple people (or processes on the same computer) to download at max speed (whatever it may be) - assuming they are not all downloading from the same server.

The only real way to tell if you are getting Gigabit download speeds, is to test against a Speedtest server (which generally has Gigabit upload speed ), is within the Rogers network, and is close by (ie a few kilometers). Rogers can’t control what happens outside their network, and servers more than a few km away (say on the mainland, or Europe, or another city) will be sharing bandwidth with everyone else in between.

If I test my download speed against the Rogers Speedtest server in my city, I get 950Mbps, but another server in a nearby city will give 750Mbps. That’s not Rogers fault. That’s just the way the internet works.

I would like to see faster upload speeds though, as 1000/30 is too much of an imbalance, and I do upload a lot to cloud backup services/teleconferencing/just stuff. 1000/100 would seem reasonable to me, seeing as I went from 250/20, to 1000/30, ie 4x download speed, but only a small increase on upload speed (relatively speaking).

This will be driven by marketing though, not technology. We will get what we demand, and Rogers will charge what they can get.


@Nick_W

I agree, I would love to see more upload speed, however DOCSIS is limited in upload compared to download bandwidth. Rogers is going to be launching DOCSIS 3.1 sometime this year which should help with upload bandwidth, I'm hoping for 1000/100.



I'm a Regular
Posts: 880

Re: Let's talk Upstream Bandwidth

Will the upload running on docs 3.1 improve congestion issues and ping , lower latency?
I'm a Reliable Contributor
Posts: 348

Re: Let's talk Upstream Bandwidth

There are other options if fast upload matters a lot to you.  Bell offers a business service with symmetric speeds of 300 and 940 and it is about the same price as their "residential" service.  Hopefully Rogers offers something similar in the near future.

 

I haven't found congestion to be an issue with Rogers, not for years.  I have 250/20 service from Rogers but when using speedtest.net I consistently get speeds of 325/21.

I'm a Regular
Posts: 880

Re: Let's talk Upstream Bandwidth

Congestion all depends on the area
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 37

Re: Let's talk Upstream Bandwidth

Bell now has 1 Gbps / 940 Mbps speeds at my address. I'm really considering switching to Bell from Rogers.
I do not understand why the upload speeds max at 30 Mbps with Rogers when I have FTTH (the finer goes directly to my condo unit then is converted to cable).

This is nonsense.

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,294

Re: Let's talk Upstream Bandwidth

That fibre cable replaces the copper cable that usually runs from the CMTS to your modem.  It is literally a copper cable replacement, without affecting the CMTS or modem connecting ports. 

 

The upload rates over DOCSIS will increase over time.  The specification for Full Duplex (symmetrical) DOCSIS were completed last year, so, changing from the lower upload rates to high rate Full Duplex won't happen overnight. 

 

http://www.zdnet.com/article/cablelabs-completes-full-duplex-docsis-specs-for-1010gbps-cable-broadba...

 

As far as I'm aware, the only ISP that is testing upstream DOCSIS is Australia's National Broadband Network (NBN).  They're supposed to roll out Full Duplex later this year.  Rogers will also be rolling out upstream DOCSIS later this year.  I suspect that will remain limited in bandwidth, just a question of high fast the current spec DOCSIS 3.1 upstream can run.  I don't know if further changes are required to the modems or CMTS to support Full Duplex.  Note that the Full Duplex spec calls for 10 Gb/s download and upload, surpassing Bells 1 gig down and up. 

 

So, if you happen to live in an area that Bell has serviced with FTTH, congrats.  For the remaining 99.x % of Canada that doesn't have Bell's fibre installation, they will have to make due with DOCSIS, DSL, VDSL and others. 



I'm a Reliable Contributor
Posts: 623

Re: Let's talk Upstream Bandwidth

We are likely a year away from DOCIS 3.1 and about 4 to 5 years from FULL DOCSIS, we need to be patient with upload.

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 37

Re: Let's talk Upstream Bandwidth

LOL 'we need to be patient' no! A lot of us live in buildings where Rogers provides Fiber DIRECTLY to the condo unit.
If Rogers is too unwilling to convert it to cable instead of benefiting from it, I am out.

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 37

Re: Let's talk Upstream Bandwidth

Except no, a lot of people are deserved by FTTH now. Back in 2014 when I was in Québec City, most of the city already was desserved by FTTH. Bell is investing massively in the true future that is Fiber because nothing beats it.
Also, think of all the new recent constructions in cities like Toronto.

Bell might now give the fastest speeds to everyone, but at least when they do, it's solid.

My main point is that most of the new buildings have Rogers FTTH. But instead of using that, Rogers converts fiber to cable in every unit. Now that is a waste.
I do not care about all of you others who do not have FTTH. My point is, give the speeds to the FTTH customers with proper equipment. Simple.
Bell is able to provide VDSL to people that do not have FTTH, and true FTTH to people who do. So why can't Rogers give me true FTTH when it comes right up to my apartment? Why do I have to be in the same boat as those who don't have FTTH?