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What are good signal levels

s1lva166
I Plan to Stick Around

Hi everyone!

 

I'm currently on the Hybrid Fibre 150 package and I'm using the Hitron CGN3ROG modem/router. I was wondering what are good downstream and upstream signal ratios? If someone could provide a range that would be great. I'm also wondering what were the best signals you have seen coming from the router? Here is a screen shot of my current signals:

 

Downstream:
http://snag.gy/lVf3P.jpg

 

Upstream:

http://snag.gy/UOm2F.jpg

 

Thanks!

 

 

***edited labels***

186 REPLIES 186

Re: What are good signal levels

User1030445
I Plan to Stick Around

I have run speed tests today and still running between 400->500gb on my laptop so that seems fine.

 

Sorry 400->520mb per second not gb,  duhhh 😉  Also I should have mentioned I am on a 500mb package, not the

gigabit one so these speeds are reasonable.

Re: What are good signal levels

@User1030445 call tech support and ask the Customer Service Rep to run a signal check on your modem.  Your DOCSIS 3.0 channels ( 1 to 32) are all low.  They should be sitting at 0 dBmV.  After a splitter its understandable to see them around -4/-5 dBmV.  Ideally however, they should be at 0 dBmV across the board.  

 

Your modem appears to be using the upper DOCSIS 3.0  channels instead of the DOCSIS 3.1 OFDM channel.  It should be using the DOCSIS 3.1 ODFM channel.  The OFDM channel details aren't complete, so, that's a hint that there's an issue in the 200 to 500 Mhz band that is preventing the OFDM channel from operating correctly.  

 

Your upstream DOCSIS 3.0 channels are in a normal range for this modem.  

 

That signal check should fail automatically, followed by a discussion to get a tech out to your home. 



Re: What are good signal levels

User1030445
I Plan to Stick Around

 

  Had that discussion with tech support,  tech coming out Thursday morning. To me the loss in the house looks normal given the RG6 (50ft) and one -3.5db 2 way splitter,  given the signal level coming into the house that gets a weak signal to the modem, kind on the edge from my experience.   I used to work in network ops for Bell. The Rogers splitter in the basement actually adds some gain to the signal as it is supposed to eliminate any loss due to the splitter,  net/net the signal coming in to it should be the same going out according to the specs for that splitter.  That suggests that -4 to -6db is how the Rogers signal  comes into the house.   That struck me as low.

 

  Any suggestions on what the tech should be looking for?  

Re: What are good signal levels

@User1030445 the tech should check the external cable and its connectors.  He or she will probably replace the external connectors and determine if in fact the external cable requires a swap.  In theory, with the cable losses from the neighbourhood node to the modem, and the signal level ramp up at the neighbourhood to counteract those losses, you should see 0 dBmV without a splitter in place.  That's to the modem.  Unfortunately, those external cables and connectors don't last forever and require replacement every once in a while.  Its also possible that there's an issue at the local tap (at the pedestal), or beyond.  Sometimes this takes more than one visit.  After the tech is finished, repost the signal levels, just to see where you're at, and if more needs to be done. 

 

That 0 dBmV might be higher or lower depending on how close you are to the neighbourhood node. 

 

Are you running the speedtests via ethernet or wifi?

 

Just to note, you have a noise problem as shown with the DOCSIS 3.0 channels ( 1 to 32).  They should be in a range of 36 to 40 dB.  I'd suspect that the noise problem runs the range of the cable frequencies.

 

The OFDM data as shown in the user interface isn't complete.  Tech support and the field techs have access to the signal level, signal to noise ratios and QAM level.  The QAM level for the OFDM channel should be at 1024.  Anything less, there's something afoot.  The bottom level is 64 QAM.  Below that the modem bails out of DOCSIS 3.1 and uses the upper 3.0 downstream channels.



Re: What are good signal levels

User1030445
I Plan to Stick Around

 

 Appreciate the feedback !   Wasn't sure what the incoming levels should be, I suspected after moving the modem around they were too low coming in.

 

 I have run the speed tests with both wired and wireless on a laptop, similiar for both depending on time of day.  Kind of surprised looking at the signal levels I am able to get up to 500mbps ,  sometimes more,  500mbps is what my package is for.  

 

Kind of dates me but I working on the data side at Bell I can remember customers paying $1300 a month for T1 speeds(1.5mb) ,  $20k a month for T3 speeds (45mb) back in the 90's.  Pretty amazed at how far we have come,  I retired in 2008 not long after DSL became widespread.   Became a Rogers customer not long after that,  knew the advantage your network had for residential customers with coax.  

 

I have security systems, cameras, thermostats etc.. set up for wifi access and when the internet drops it creates havoc with all of them.  We were in Italy a few weeks ago and I had to have a neighbour come in to reboot the modem as once it dropped it wouldn't reconnect.  I was blind as to what was happening in the house,  you get dependent on this stuff.   It had been flawless for a year or so before that,  trouble since that time, we had a lot of rain in London the last month.

 

Thanks again !! Hopefully the tech can sort it out.

 

Re: What are good signal levels

Unfortunately the external cable and its connectors (including the connectors at the local tap and at the house demarcation point ) don't last forever, so, at some point one or both require replacement.  If that's all it is, its a relatively easy fix.  If the problem is at the local tap or further upstream, that's more of a problem, but, in that case, you're not the only one seeing the effects. If that's the case, its takes persistence to push for Senior Techs (Rogers Tech instead of contractors), or possibly a maintenance crew.  That's why I indicated to repost the signal levels after the tech is finished.  



Re: What are good signal levels

User1030445
I Plan to Stick Around

 Will do !!

 

 I have had some experience with the contractors ,  back in 2016,  sure you are aware some of them have limited knowledge.  Probably a pain for them having a customer that understands a lot of this.  Tech was sure it was a bad buried wire,  put a temp in,  changed nothing,  actually added loss as it was much longer than the original in an attempt to get around the neighbours driveway.  Eventually after replacing connectors , putting in the temp,  removing the temp, testing at the ped he referred it back to a Rogers tech.  Long story short,  turned out to be a primary feeder around the corner that the Rogers cable guys came out to repair.  Ran into them and asked them what was up , wet cable.  You never know but it has been pretty wet the last month 😉

Re: What are good signal levels

 

Can someone look at my below modem stats and confirm that everything looks good on my connection? I am a new customer, and new to cable internet.

 

Cheers

 Jeff

 

DOCSIS WAN

This menu displays both upstream and downstream signal parameters

DOCSIS Overview
Downstream Overview
Port ID Frequency (MHz) Modulation Signal strength (dBmV) Channel ID Signal noise ratio (dB)
1 591000000 256QAM 2.900 7 37.636
2 849000000 256QAM 3.300 2 38.605
3 855000000 256QAM 3.400 3 38.983
4 861000000 256QAM 3.700 4 38.983
5 579000000 256QAM 4.100 5 37.636
6 585000000 256QAM 2.400 6 37.356
7 279000000 256QAM 1.800 1 37.356
8 597000000 256QAM 3.500 8 37.356
9 603000000 256QAM 3.700 9 37.636
10 609000000 256QAM 4.200 10 37.636
11 615000000 256QAM 3.900 11 37.636
12 621000000 256QAM 4.600 12 37.636
13 633000000 256QAM 3.700 13 37.636
14 639000000 256QAM 3.900 14 38.605
15 645000000 256QAM 4.800 15 38.605
16 651000000 256QAM 5.800 16 38.983
17 657000000 256QAM 5.100 17 38.605
18 663000000 256QAM 4.400 18 38.605
19 669000000 256QAM 4.700 19 38.605
20 675000000 256QAM 5.800 20 38.605
21 681000000 256QAM 6.000 21 38.605
22 687000000 256QAM 5.500 22 38.258
23 693000000 256QAM 5.300 23 38.983
24 699000000 256QAM 4.900 24 38.605
25 705000000 256QAM 6.000 25 38.605
26 711000000 256QAM 4.600 26 37.356
27 717000000 256QAM 5.900 27 38.605
28 723000000 256QAM 6.000 28 38.605
29 825000000 256QAM 4.600 29 38.983
30 831000000 256QAM 4.200 30 38.605
31 837000000 256QAM 4.300 31 38.983
32 843000000 256QAM 3.400 32 38.983
OFDM Downstream Overview
Receiver FFT type Subcarr 0 Frequency(MHz) PLC locked NCP locked MDC1 locked PLC power(dBmv)
0 NA NA NO NO NO NA
1 4K 275600000 YES YES YES 2.099998
Upstream Overview
Port ID Frequency (MHz) Modulation Signal strength (dBmV) Channel ID Bandwidth
1 25300000 ATDMA - 64QAM 42.000 2 3200000
2 36996000 ATDMA - 64QAM 38.750 4 6400000
3 30596000 ATDMA - 64QAM 38.500 3 6400000
4 22100000 ATDMA - 64QAM 40.250 1 3200000
OFDM/OFDMA Overview
Channel Index State lin Digital Att Digital Att BW (sc's*fft) Report Power Report Power1_6 FFT Size
0 DISABLED 0.5000 0.0000 0.0000 -inf -1.0000 4K
1 DISABLED 0.5000 0.0000 0.0000 -inf -1.0000 4K

Re: What are good signal levels

User1030445
I Plan to Stick Around

 

 Tech was here today,  confirmed that the issue with signal levels is because of the buried coax between the house and the pedestal.   He said he could place a temp but it would really be an issue for my neighbour given the pedestal placement,  his driveway etc..  can't be replaced until next spring. 

 The signal level is down in the mud but the S/N is very good.  I suggested putting an amp on it to boost the signal in the house versus putting  a temp which he agreed to.   I get 3 or 4 drops a day,  by no means out of service.  Trouble was he didn't have a booster in his vehicle ,  said he would be back in a couple of hours with one and never showed.  

 Called back in, another tech coming tomorrow now.  

 

 @Datalink I know you don't work for Rogers , just wondered if you know if they would normally put a booster on in the house or is this an issue for me to to get it done?  Don't understand why the guy would make a commitment, not show up and not call.  

Re: What are good signal levels

Hello, @jrsx13

 

Welcome to the Rogers Community Forums!

 

I know how important it is to have good signal levels so your service works properly.

 

The signal levels that you've posted look within the correct range I am not seeing any channels that are out of specification. Are you currently experiencing any issues with your internet service?

 

RogersTony

Re: What are good signal levels

User1030445
I Plan to Stick Around

 

 Followup to my post from yesterday...

 

Another tech came out today after I called in last night  to support explaining the original tech did not come back as promised.  He had closed the ticket despite assuring me he would return with a 15db amplifier and install that afternoon.  Hard to understand why this tech would commit himself and then not even bother calling,  poor service. 

 

A SC 360 tech came out today with a amplifier installed it and now I have good levels and the S/N is still well within scope.  I do need my buried wire replaced but that will wait until next spring.  The tech who was here yesterday apparently did not issue the order for that work either.  The tech today did, gave me the website and where to keep track of its progress.  Will be next spring b4 it can be installed.  Interesting that the tech that came out today knew the previous tech, said that earlier tech worked for a different contractor  he also informed me that tech was actually a escalation tech and a supervisor of some sorts.  The first tech sure didn't act that way given how he dropped the ball.  Great tech today,  the guy yesterday needs to have someone clarify to him about service levels and what is expected.  All is well that ends well,  hopefully I won't have the issues getting the new buried wire placed , this was not a great performance by Rogers.

 

Downstream Overview
Port IDFrequency (MHz)ModulationSignal strength (dBmV)Channel IDSignal noise ratio (dB)
1591000000256QAM-2.600735.084
2855000000256QAM-7.300334.484
3861000000256QAM-7.200434.346
4579000000256QAM-3.400534.926
5585000000256QAM-3.000634.926
6849000000256QAM-7.000234.484
7597000000256QAM-2.700835.595
8603000000256QAM-3.100935.595
9609000000256QAM-3.2001035.595
10615000000256QAM-2.7001135.595
11621000000256QAM-2.9001235.084
12633000000256QAM-3.0001335.084
13639000000256QAM-3.1001435.595
14645000000256QAM-3.3001535.084
15651000000256QAM-3.4001634.926
16657000000256QAM-3.4001735.084
17663000000256QAM-3.3001835.084
18669000000256QAM-3.3001935.780
19675000000256QAM-3.3002035.595
20681000000256QAM-3.0002135.595
21687000000256QAM-3.3002235.595
22693000000256QAM-3.2002335.595
23699000000256QAM-3.4002435.595
24705000000256QAM-3.4002535.595
25711000000256QAM-3.4002635.595
26717000000256QAM-3.4002735.780
27723000000256QAM-3.6002835.595
28825000000256QAM-5.9002934.926
29831000000256QAM-6.0003035.084
30837000000256QAM-6.3003134.926
31843000000256QAM-6.7003234.926
32303000000256QAM1.800135.595
OFDM Downstream Overview
ReceiverFFT typeSubcarr 0 Frequency(MHz)PLC lockedNCP lockedMDC1 lockedPLC power(dBmv)
04K290600000YESYESYES0.400002
1NANANONONONA
Upstream Overview
Port IDFrequency (MHz)ModulationSignal strength (dBmV)Channel IDBandwidth
125300000ATDMA - 64QAM41.50023200000
236996000ATDMA - 64QAM40.25046400000
330596000ATDMA - 64QAM39.75036400000
422100000ATDMA - 64QAM41.50013200000
OFDM/OFDMA Overview
Channel IndexStatelin Digital AttDigital AttBW (sc's*fft)Report PowerReport Power1_6FFT Size
0DISABLED0.50000.00000.0000-inf-1.00004K
1DISABLED0.50000.00000.0000-inf-1.00004K

Re: What are good signal levels

@User1030445 can you delete the data above the "Downstream Overview" as that is specific to the modem and shouldn't be posted in an open forum.

 

The problem with the booster is that is amplifies bad signals and hides cable issues.  In the case of a failing cable due to water ingress, where you're experiencing disconnects, the amp won't solve that problem.  It will be interesting to see how many disconnects you end up seeing with the amp in place. 

 

The amplifiers in use these days have two types of ports, an non-amplified VOIP port which is also used for the modem, and the amplified ports which are used for all of other cable connected devices.  That non-amplified VOIP port is essentially one leg of an internal two port splitter.  The other internal port leg would feed the amplifier.  A modem that is connected to an amplified port can experience packet loss, which is why the modems are usually connected to that VOIP port.  So, that is something to watch for, new instances or increased packet loss. 

 

Plan B would be to run an RG-11 cable from the pedestal, all the way to the back of the neighbours yard, assuming that there's a shared fence between the neighbours with the pedestal on their front yard.  I'm assuming here that the pedestal is between the driveways, on a common shared space.  So, running an RG-11 cable all the way to the back of the yard, if possible, then hang a 90 degree turn to run towards your yard, running along the back fence of your neighbours yard until it reaches your yard, then hang another 90 degree turn on your side of the fence between you and your neighbour, and then back towards the front of the yard and then taking a short cut towards the demarcation point at the side of the house  Essentially a large U shape cable run.  My neighbours a couple of doors down from us had the same situation happen in late fall / early winter.  The tech on call ran a long cable that was in place until the spring, when a shorter cable run was buried in a more direct path.  I don't know why either tech didn't suggest this.  

 

So, keep this in mind if the amp doesn't work.  There's always a way to temporarily solve this.  But, it can only happen if you ask / negotiate with the neighbours to allow that cable run to the back fence, in a manner that doesn't pose a tripping hazard to anyone.  So, thats a key point, whether or not there's a path to the back fence and whether that path is traversed on a regular basis or not.  If that path is a no man's land, where no one travels thru in the winter, then running a cable shouldn't be a huge issue.  But, Rogers or any other company tech can't simply traverse (trespass) on someone's property.  The tech would have to have permission from your neighbours, and would have to ensure that there is no damage to anything along the cable's path.  This can be done very easily, but, access permission and the proper attention to prevent any damage is essential. 

 

The RG-11 cable is a heavier cable when compared to RG-6, so it has less signal loss compared to RG-6, which would make it potentially suitable for this situation.  I'm assuming here that you're on a regular city sized lot.  If you have a much longer or wider yard than one normally sees within a city, then this probably wouldn't work, even with RG-11 cabling.  This would also depend on the signal levels at the pedestal.  If those signal levels are adequate, and the cable run length isn't extreme, then this should work using RG-11.  RG-6, which is normally used might work as well, but then it would really be dependent on the signal levels at the tap and the cable run length.  


At the present time your modem is using the upstream DOCSIS 3.0 channels which are down below 50 Mhz, and using the DOCSIS 3.1 OFDM channel which tops out at 480 Mhz in your particular case.  If you look at the linked PDF you can see the cable losses for both RG-6 and RG-11.  If you look at the 550 Mhz frequency line, you can see that the RG-6 cable is about 6 dB higher in losses, so, there is a difference in the cables, so RG-11 would be the preferred cable if you have to go down this route. 

 

https://www.multicominc.com/wp-content/uploads/Attenuation.pdf

 



Re: What are good signal levels

User1030445
I Plan to Stick Around

 

 Thanks, hadn't noticed I had grabbed the IP address when I posted the previous.  Amended.

 

 Regarding the temp wire,  yes to place a wire would require such a long run that the loss is too great,  it was tried once already in the past.   I discussed that with the tech yesterday and again with the new tech today,  back in 2016 a tech ran one then ended up removing it because it created more problems than it solved.   I didn't see the stats on the internet at that  time but immediately our cable dropped channels and had lots of pixelation,  we were better off with the cable in the ground.  

 

 The stats look good so far on this setup , no drops in 6 hours, no warnings on the stats.   I did a packet loss test here the results below, I blanked out some info the first hop etc.  which might identify my modem, there were some hops that I couldn't capture off this screen but I believe the first few is all that matters regarding the local network.  I have been running 610mbps with speed tests this afternoon on wireless ,  I have a 500mbps package.   Thanks for your assistance.

 

 Ping1.JPG

Re: What are good signal levels

Alex4161
I'm a Reliable Contributor

Are my signal levels OK?

I have been noticing that I keep losing my OFDM Downstream connection after a day or so and need to power cycle the modem to get it connected.  Here are my signal levels.  Are they OK and what is considered good or bad:

 

Downstream Overview
Port ID Frequency (MHz) Modulation Signal strength (dBmV) Channel ID Signal noise ratio (dB)
1 609000000 256QAM -0.700 10 37.636
2 591000000 256QAM 1.800 7 38.983
3 597000000 256QAM 1.300 8 38.983
4 849000000 256QAM -3.900 2 37.636
5 855000000 256QAM -4.400 3 37.356
6 861000000 256QAM -4.800 4 36.610
7 579000000 256QAM 0.900 5 37.356
8 585000000 256QAM 1.500 6 38.605
9 603000000 256QAM 0.500 9 38.605
10 279000000 256QAM 4.300 1 38.983
11 615000000 256QAM -1.400 11 37.636
12 621000000 256QAM -1.900 12 37.636
13 633000000 256QAM -1.700 13 37.636
14 639000000 256QAM -1.600 14 37.356
15 645000000 256QAM -1.000 15 38.605
16 651000000 256QAM -0.100 16 38.605
17 657000000 256QAM 0.800 17 38.605
18 663000000 256QAM 1.700 18 38.605
19 669000000 256QAM 2.200 19 38.983
20 675000000 256QAM 2.600 20 38.605
21 681000000 256QAM 2.400 21 38.605
22 687000000 256QAM 1.500 22 38.983
23 693000000 256QAM 0.800 23 38.605
24 699000000 256QAM 0.100 24 38.605
25 705000000 256QAM -1.100 25 38.605
26 711000000 256QAM -1.500 26 38.605
27 717000000 256QAM -1.300 27 38.605
28 723000000 256QAM -1.000 28 38.605
29 825000000 256QAM -3.000 29 37.356
30 831000000 256QAM -3.000 30 37.356
31 837000000 256QAM -3.300 31 37.636
32 843000000 256QAM -3.800 32 37.356
OFDM Downstream Overview
Receiver FFT type Subcarr 0 Frequency(MHz) PLC locked NCP locked MDC1 locked PLC power(dBmv)
0 NA NA NO NO NO NA
1 4K 275600000 YES YES YES 3.000000
Upstream Overview
Port ID Frequency (MHz) Modulation Signal strength (dBmV) Channel ID Bandwidth
1 38596000 ATDMA - 64QAM 33.250 3 3200000
2 30596000 ATDMA - 64QAM 30.500 1 6400000
3 23700000 ATDMA - 64QAM 29.250 2 6400000
OFDM/OFDMA Overview
Channel Index State lin Digital Att Digital Att BW (sc's*fft) Report Power Report Power1_6 FFT Size
0 DISABLED 0.5000 0.0000 0.0000 -inf -1.0000 4K
1 DISABLED 0.5000 0.0000 0.0000 -inf -1.0000 4K

Re: What are good signal levels

Alex4161
I'm a Reliable Contributor

I was looking at the signal levels and the upstream might be off given there is an 8 Db pad on the line.  Removing it puts the signal at around 30 dBmV

 

Downstream Overview
Port ID Frequency (MHz) Modulation Signal strength (dBmV) Channel ID Signal noise ratio (dB)
1 693000000 256QAM 1.900 23 38.983
2 579000000 256QAM 2.600 5 38.605
3 585000000 256QAM 3.000 6 38.983
4 591000000 256QAM 2.900 7 38.983
5 597000000 256QAM 2.500 8 38.983
6 603000000 256QAM 1.200 9 38.605
7 609000000 256QAM 0.200 10 38.605
8 615000000 256QAM -0.600 11 38.605
9 621000000 256QAM -1.000 12 37.636
10 633000000 256QAM -0.800 13 37.356
11 639000000 256QAM -0.300 14 37.636
12 645000000 256QAM 0.300 15 38.605
13 651000000 256QAM 1.000 16 38.983
14 657000000 256QAM 1.900 17 38.605
15 663000000 256QAM 2.700 18 38.605
16 669000000 256QAM 3.200 19 38.983
17 675000000 256QAM 3.500 20 40.366
18 681000000 256QAM 3.400 21 40.366
19 687000000 256QAM 2.700 22 38.983
20 279000000 256QAM 4.700 1 40.366
21 699000000 256QAM 1.200 24 38.983
22 705000000 256QAM 0.400 25 38.605
23 711000000 256QAM 0.200 26 38.605
24 717000000 256QAM 0.600 27 38.605
Upstream Overview
Port ID Frequency (MHz) Modulation Signal strength (dBmV) Channel ID Bandwidth
1 38700000 ATDMA - 64QAM 36.000 4 6400000
2 21100000 ATDMA - 64QAM 36.000 1 3200000
3 32300000 ATDMA - 64QAM 36.250 3 6400000
4 25900000 ATDMA - 64QAM 36.000 2 6400000

Re: What are good signal levels

Hey @Alex4161!

 

Can you confirm for us if you're experiencing any issues with your service?

 

The levels of your downstream and upstream are in spec though it doesn't look like all your downstream channels are showing/shown in your provided data. I recommend reviewing the troubleshooting details in our knowledge base here for more information.

 

@RogersAndy

Re: What are good signal levels

inker
I Plan to Stick Around

I get e-mail messages about replies in this thread. It has been a couple years since I posted... I have since learned what my issues were.... Now I can't reflect on my exact post on my problems but the answer to the last few I had was the same. 

 

1st.. I had brutal ping and latency.. Half of it was the server I was gaming on but the quick drops from games and high ping was result of poor wire across my lawn. Once temps hit -6 I can expect interruptions. This recovers once it warms up. My line across my grass is shallow, so shallow I fear hitting it with a scuff from the lawn mower. It's amazing what poorly buried line can be effected by the cold temps. Right on cue .. -6 can't game online.  Quick answer to my issue. a new line.

 

Re: What are good signal levels

Alex4161
I'm a Reliable Contributor

I updated the info as I switched modems to the XB6 and the levels I have are listed below.  What I do get time to time is some delays when switching channels on Ignite TV.

 

Download Version:Prod_19.3_d31 & Prod_19.3

 

Downstream

Channel Bonding Value
Index

7

1

2

3

4

5

6

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

Lock Status

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

Frequency

591 MHz

279 MHz

849 MHz

855 MHz

861 MHz

579 MHz

585 MHz

597 MHz

603 MHz

609 MHz

615 MHz

621 MHz

633 MHz

639 MHz

645 MHz

651 MHz

657 MHz

663 MHz

669 MHz

675 MHz

681 MHz

687 MHz

693 MHz

699 MHz

705 MHz

711 MHz

717 MHz

723 MHz

825 MHz

831 MHz

837 MHz

843 MHz

3.5E+08

SNR

40.6 dB

40.6 dB

38.4 dB

38.1 dB

37.8 dB

40.5 dB

40.5 dB

40.4 dB

40.1 dB

39.9 dB

39.6 dB

39.6 dB

39.5 dB

39.7 dB

40.0 dB

40.3 dB

40.6 dB

40.8 dB

40.9 dB

40.8 dB

40.8 dB

40.6 dB

40.4 dB

40.4 dB

39.9 dB

39.9 dB

40.1 dB

40.3 dB

38.9 dB

39.0 dB

38.8 dB

38.3 dB

NA

Power Level

0.7 dBmV

2.3 dBmV

-3.5 dBmV

-3.7 dBmV

-4.3 dBmV

0.3 dBmV

0.4 dBmV

0.4 dBmV

0.7 dBmV

-1.8 dBmV

-2.6 dBmV

-2.9 dBmV

-2.7 dBmV

-2.2 dBmV

-1.6 dBmV

0.7 dBmV

0.1 dBmV

0.9 dBmV

1.4 dBmV

1.7 dBmV

1.6 dBmV

1.0 dBmV

0.1 dBmV

0.6 dBmV

-1.4 dBmV

-1.8 dBmV

-1.4 dBmV

0.5 dBmV

-2.4 dBmV

-2.2 dBmV

-2.6 dBmV

-3.4 dBmV

NA

Modulation

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

256 QAM

OFDM

                                  
                                  

Upstream

Channel Bonding Value                            
Index

1

2

3

4

                             
Lock Status

Locked

Locked

Locked

Locked

                             
Frequency

21 MHz

25 MHz

32 MHz

38 MHz

                             
Symbol Rate

2560

5120

5120

5120

                             
Power Level

36.5 dBmV

38.0 dBmV

38.3 dBmV

37.8 dBmV

                             
Modulation

QAM

QAM

QAM

QAM

                             
Channel Type

TDMA_AND_ATDMA

ATDMA

ATDMA

ATDMA

                             
                                  

Re: What are good signal levels

netprice2high
I Plan to Stick Around

I would like to know the signal ranges for up/down streams which Rogers considers "acceptable" (shows up as PASS on their test devices), and what are the actual operable ranges which the internet still works properly, for both CGN3 and the white CODA modems?

 

I've seen some numbers like 36-40 for upstream etc. but they are mostly from years ago. Also, I've been told by multiple Rogers techs who visited my home to fix my internet that for upstream channels, up to 50 is okay. Which is simply NOT true AT ALL. Because when my upstream channels hit above 48, I start getting packet losses, then at 49 most website will time out due to heavy packet loss (75%+), at 50 literally nothing can open and packet loss is at 100% when pinging Google, at 51 the modem start dropping channels until there is only 1 upstream left which then makes the internet operable but upload speed suffers heavily as a result. Another tech told me that 36 to 48 is good. Yet another tech told me that 37 is the magic, optimal number......

 

Here are my numbers on the newer CODA-4582U, after yet another tech visit... I had the ancient CGN3U modem before.

 

Downstream Overview

Port ID

Frequency (MHz)

Modulation

Signal strength (dBmV)

Channel ID

Signal noise ratio (dB)

1

615000000

QAM256

1.200

14

38.983

2

 

UNSUPPORTED

false

0

false

3

 

UNSUPPORTED

false

0

false

4

 

UNSUPPORTED

false

0

false

5

 

UNSUPPORTED

false

0

false

6

 

UNSUPPORTED

false

0

false

7

 

UNSUPPORTED

false

0

false

8

 

UNSUPPORTED

false

0

false

9

591000000

QAM256

1.700

10

40.366

10

597000000

QAM256

1.599

11

40.366

11

603000000

QAM256

1.400

12

40.366

12

543000000

QAM256

2.500

2

40.366

13

549000000

QAM256

2.500

3

40.366

14

555000000

QAM256

2.400

4

40.366

15

561000000

QAM256

2.299

5

40.366

16

567000000

QAM256

2.099

6

40.366

17

573000000

QAM256

1.799

7

40.366

18

579000000

QAM256

2.000

8

40.366

19

585000000

QAM256

1.700

9

40.366

20

609000000

QAM256

1.099

13

38.983

21

537000000

QAM256

2.500

1

40.366

22

621000000

QAM256

1.200

15

40.366

23

627000000

QAM256

1.099

16

38.983

24

633000000

QAM256

1.099

17

38.983

25

639000000

QAM256

1.200

18

38.983

26

825000000

QAM256

-0.799

19

38.605

27

831000000

QAM256

-1.099

20

38.605

28

837000000

QAM256

-0.900

21

38.983

29

843000000

QAM256

-1.500

22

38.605

30

849000000

QAM256

-1.599

23

38.605

31

855000000

QAM256

-1.900

24

38.605

32

861000000

QAM256

-2.000

25

37.636

OFDM Downstream Overview

Receiver

FFT type

Subcarr 0 Frequency(MHz)

PLC locked

NCP locked

MDC1 locked

PLC power(dBmv)

0

4K

272600000

YES

YES

YES

3.000000

1

4K

581600000

YES

YES

YES

1.700001

                     

 

Upstream Overview

Port ID

Frequency (MHz)

Modulation

Signal strength (dBmV)

Channel ID

Bandwidth

1

25900000

64QAM

43.020

2

6400000

2

38700000

64QAM

43.020

4

6400000

3

32300000

64QAM

43.020

3

6400000

4

21100000

64QAM

44.010

1

3200000

5

0

QAM_NONE

-

---

1600000

6

0

QAM_NONE

-

---

1600000

7

0

QAM_NONE

-

---

1600000

8

0

QAM_NONE

-

---

1600000

OFDM/OFDMA Overview

 

Channel Index

State

lin Digital Att

Digital Att

BW (sc's*fft)

Report Power

Report Power1_6

FFT Size

0

DISABLED

0.0000

0.0000

0.0000

0.0000

0.0000

2K

1

DISABLED

0.0000

0.0000

0.0000

0.0000

0.0000

2K

                         

 

 

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