Rogers Gateway vs Personal Dedicated Router

Need Help?

That's what we're here for! The goal of the Rogers Community is to help you find answers on everything Rogers. Can't find what you're looking for? Just ask!
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply
21Rouge
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 53

Rogers Gateway vs Personal Dedicated Router

Confused as to using wifi via a Rgoers modem VS wifi from a separate dedicated router:

 

We have the Rogers 150 (unlimited) package. 

 

And looking online it appear we have the Rogers CGN3 (or is it the CGN3ACR?) modem. We have had this same device for many years...between 5 and 10. 

 

But we have never used the Rogers modem for its wireless capabilities but instead we have been using for wireless a now old Netgear router (I see one ethernet cable from the Rogers modem to this router). 

 

This long established setup is working fine.

 

To make a long story short I have acquired a brand new Netgear WiFi 6 router. 

 

So here are my Qs:

 

 

  • will I likely see better performance simply swapping out the old router and replacing with the brand new Wifi 6 one?

 

  • in my circumstances are there good reason(s) to not use either router for wireless but set up the existing modem to also do wireless duty? (I have never having set up the Rogers modem to also do wireless duty)

 

**Labels Added**

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,367

Re: Rogers Gateway vs Personal Dedicated Router

@21Rouge 

 

1.  You should definitely see improved wifi performace with the new router.  Set the 5 Ghz wifi channels to run in the 149 to 161 range to use the higher output power allowed for those channels.  

 

2.  You should be using the modem in Bridge mode.  Hopefully its been that way for a long time now.  With the modem in Bridge mode, the router will provide firewall services, network control, wifi services, etc, etc.  So, with the modem in Bridge mode you need to ensure that the router's firewall is up and running.  Modem's typically provide basic network and wifi services, and unless ISPs decide one day to become really generous and provide decent routers for their customers, anything that a customer buys will usually provide better service and capability than any modems the ISPs will provide.  

 

The modem model can be found at the back of the modem on the product sticker.  It will be a CGN3xxxx model, which is an Intel Puma 6 modem. 

 

To kick the modem into Bridge mode, log into the modem, thru the router, using 192.168.0.1 to navigate to the log in page.  Log in and navigate to BASIC .... GATEWAY FUNCTION.  Disable the Residential Gateway Function and Save the changes.  That will initiate a reboot into Bridge mode. 

 

To kick the modem back into Gateway mode, log into the modem, thru the router, using 192.168.100.1 to navigate to the log in page.  The log in addresses are specific to the operating mode of the modem, so that address does change.  Log in and navigate back to the BASIC .... GATEWAY FUNCTION tab.  Enable the Residential Gateway Function and Save the Changes  That will initiate a reboot back into Gateway mode with the previous settings intact.  This is an easier way to change the modem's operating mode back to Gateway Function.  The other way is to run a Factory reset using the user interface, or, to depress the recessed reset button at the back of the modem for 30 seconds and then releasing it.  That will initiate a Factory Reset followed by a reboot into Gateway mode.  After that you would have to set the modem back up again (ugh!) from scratch.  

 

If you don't have a Windows wifi analysis program, download Winfi Lite from https://www.helge-keck.com/

 

When that is running, select the Wrench (Tools) icon from the second row near the right hand side.  That will bring up the bottom data display.  From that display, select "Spectrum" to show the graphical interpretation of the data.  

 

In the upper text area, sort the data using RSSI, which is the received power levels in dB milli-watts.  Sort the data in descending order by selecting the RSSI column title, which will sort the data up or down depending on what is currently shown.  That data column is a negative data column, that is to say, zero is at the top of the scale, -90 is at the bottom of the scale.  The best that one can do normally is around -25 to -30 dbmw. 

 

By looking at the text graphical data, that will show who else you're competing with, in terms of channel usage. 

 



21Rouge
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 53

Re: Rogers Gateway vs Personal Dedicated Router

I really appreciate your detailed reply Datalink but you have me "worried" given my less than stellar technical skills.

 

As I said "things' are working now with my old router in place and I thought all I had to to was switch the router, plugging in the one ethernet cable and I would be good to go but you are telling me I think that I should first check that the Rogers modem is set for "Bridge Mode"? And if it is then I am good to go?

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,367

Re: Rogers Gateway vs Personal Dedicated Router

🙂  Never worry about "less than stellar technical skills".  That's what this forum is for, providing explanations of how to do things like replacing routers.  

 

Typically, when a user installs a router, it's done with the idea in mind that the modem is set to run in Bridge mode, running as a modem only.  So, it doesn't provide any firewall, network management, wifi services, etc.  The router does all of that.  

 

Now, if you're running the modem in Gateway mode, which is its default operating mode, that means that the modem is providing its normal firewall, network management, wifi services, etc.  After that, the router is doing the same for its network.  You can run that configuration if you want to, its just not terribly efficient as you now have a double Network Address Translation (double NAT) configuration running.  That is to say that the modem, with its firewall running is translating the incoming packets from its external IP address to the correct internal IP address.  In turn, the router is doing the same.  If you're not running anything at high speed, you probably won't notice the difference.  The one point where this might matter is your choice of the Domain Name Server (DNS).  With the modem running in Gateway mode, without any changes by you, the modem will use the Rogers DNS as its primary DNS.  In the router, without you setting the DNS to Google, OpenDNS or anything else, it will accept the Rogers DNS as the primary DNS.  Now, the interesting question is whether or not the modem will intercept the outgoing DNS query from the router and direct it to Rogers DNS.  Say for example you wanted to use Google, OpenDNS, Cira.ca or any other DNS of your choice and set those addresses in the router.  In theory, the router should use what you had set, and send any web address queries to the selected DNS.  But, I'm just wondering if the modem will then intercept those queries and direct them to the Rogers DNS.  This is just a question at this point.  Hopefully you can see what I'm getting at here, that there is a possibility that you're not using the DNS of your choice.  You might know the answer to that if you were using a specific DNS that provided screening and blocking capabilities and you had noted previously that those screening and blocking capabilities were working as expected.  So, that is food for thought.  

 

So, getting back to the configuration where the modem is running in Gateway mode, depending on your network layout, you might need to be able to use the ethernet ports on the modem for devices near the modem.  Ok, that's a pretty good reason to run the modem in Gateway mode.  With the router in full router mode, with its firewall up and running, you would have two networks running, one connected to the modem, and one connected to the router.  

 

If your modem is running in Gateway mode, you can, or should be able to, without any problems, connect the new router to any port on the modem and connect to that router to set it up and configure it as necessary.  When you're done with the configuration, you can then swap your network over to the new router.  If you have a use for the old router, you can still keep using it.  

 

To log into the modem, thru the router, with the modem in Gateway mode, use:  192.168.0.1

 

To log into the modem, thru the router, with the modem in Bridge mode, use:  192.168.100.1

 

So, if you simply start a web browser, and type in 192.168.0.1 in the address bar and hit enter, that should take you to the modem's log in page.  After logging in, you can navigate to the BASIC .... GATEWAY FUNCTION tab and confirm that the Residential Gateway Function is currently enabled, which means that the modem is running in Gateway mode.  

 

To change the modem's operating mode to Bridge mode, all you have to do is disable the Residential Gateway Function and Save the Changes.  That will initiate a reboot into Bridge mode.  

 

Now, fwiw, Rogers does support two devices connected to the modem when the modem is operating in Bridge mode.  So, in theory, with both routers connected to the modem, all you should have to do is kick the modem into Bridge mode and both routers should end up with their own IP addresses, providing two independent networks.  

 

If you're thinking of using both routers with the modem in Bridge mode, have a look at the following post from this morning, which provides more explanation of using two routers with the modem in Bridge mode:

 

https://communityforums.rogers.com/t5/CODA-Modem-Trial/Bridge-Mode-WAN-Detection-Issue-CODA-4582-ASU...

 

 



21Rouge
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 53

Re: Rogers Gateway vs Personal Dedicated Router

 

To log into the modem, thru the router, with the modem in Bridge mode, use:  192.168.100.1

 

I wasnt able to login in Gateway mode i.e it time out but yes I just was able to see the login screen for the address  192.168.100.1  (but Cusadmin and password weren't the correct credentials supposedly wrong username).

 

 

 

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,367

Re: Rogers Gateway vs Personal Dedicated Router

cusadmin is the username that Rogers uses for its modem.  The modem password should be the same as your wifi passphrase.  Rogers changed the modem setup three or four (?) years ago so that when you start to set up the modem, you have to enter a wifi passphrase, which is also used as the modem password.  

 

Now, its possible to go into the modem and change the modem password, so that its different than the wifi passphrase.  If you've done that, and don't remember the password, you can call tech support and ask the Customer Service Rep to set the modem password to one that you can use to log into the modem.  After that, when you're logged into the modem, you can reset the password to something else of your choice. 

 

The password management tab in the modem is located at ADMIN .... MANAGEMENT

 

The fact that you used 192.168.100.1 to navigate to the log in page suggests/indicates that the modem is running in Bridge mode at the present time. 



21Rouge
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 53

Re: Rogers Gateway vs Personal Dedicated Router

Datalink, given at least that I get the login screen for the address 192.168.100.1 (and not for 192.168.0.1) means that my current set up is in "preferable" BRIDGE MODE (given that I use a separate router)?

 

(Oops, I see that is what you wrote at the end of your previous post...sorry)

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,367

Re: Rogers Gateway vs Personal Dedicated Router

Yup, I'd say that you're correct.  If you log into your router, have a look at the WAN IP address.  Its probably something like 174.xxx.xxx.xxx, which is another indication that the modem is running in Bridge mode.  A WAN IP address of something like 99.xxx.xxx.xxx would indicate that the modem is running in Gateway mode.  



21Rouge
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 53

Re: Rogers Gateway vs Personal Dedicated Router

I logged into my existing NETGEAR router and I see no reference to WAN but did see this:

 

Router Information.PNGRouter Display.PNG

 

Does this tell us more about my modem setup given that right now I cant log into the modem?

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,367

Re: Rogers Gateway vs Personal Dedicated Router

Actually that just clouds the picture, so to speak.  Historically that Internet Port IP address tells me that the modem is operating in Gateway mode.  If so, then the internet port IP address of the router should be 192.168.0.x not 99.xxx.xxx.xxx

 

So, something doesn't add up for some reason.  Easiest way to resolve this is to call tech support and ask the Customer Service Rep to reset the modem password to something of your choosing.  Then you can log into the modem and find out what its set for.  Tech support can also tell you what mode the modem is operating in. 

 

Have you tried your router's wifi passphrase as the modem's password?  I'm thinking that when you setup the router, maybe you used the same wifi passphrase, simply transferring it from the modem to the router??

 

If you type in    whatsmyip    in a web browser and run a google search, it will show your current WAN IP address, which is either the address that the Modem has in Gateway mode, or the address that the router has with the modem in Bridge mode.  Historically, 99.xxx.xxx.xxx means that the modem is in Gateway mode, 174.xxx.xxx.xxx means that the modem is in Bridge mode.  So, the earlier image creates more confusion at this point. 

 

??  Maybe Rogers has flipped those IP address assignments for your CMTS??  Just wondering aloud here