Gigabit Speeds

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I'm a Reliable Contributor
Posts: 586

Re: Gigabit Speeds

OFDM multi-profile support should (theoretically) improve service consistency by allowing Rogers to deliver 1Gbps no matter what, however what angers me the most is that they can only deliver 30Mbps upload, meanwhile Bell is delivering a whopping 940Mbps upload. 

 

Also, what happened to OFDMA? D3.1 has been in service for close to two years now, but it looks like the industry is taking too long to deliver D3.1 on upload. Why? 

 

Bell will definitely have a huge lead when they introduce 5Gbps next year, and I'm hoping they carry their momentum by making a huge commitment to bring FTTH to more customers in  Mississauga, Brampton, Vaughan, Richmond Hill, and Markham.

 

If Rogers plans to compete with bell by adopting FDX DOCSIS, would it really be worth it? FDX DOCSIS field trials are expected to start next year, and realistically, we'd be looking at the year 2020 when it would be first available to the consumer. Bell would have a commanding lead by then. Rogers could try to compete by using D3.1 and by using frequencies up to 1.2Ghz (as in the D3.1 spec), but that would require new nodes, amps, and splitters. Rogers won't be close to competing in terms of upload speeds, because there still would be a lot of customers on Digital TV, which would be using precious spectrum that would rather be used for OFDMA.

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I'm a Reliable Contributor
Posts: 586

Re: Gigabit Speeds

Some extra information about node splitting said by CEO Joe Natale during the Q2 earnings call: 

 

"So we're saying right now across our footprint at about 300 homes per node. We're working very well to on a case-by-case basis, success basis to really do nodes of segmentation splitting as appropriate. In some cases, we are completed that activity in some neighborhoods, other neighborhoods we are not. We're just kind of working our way through it, it's very evolutionary, very success based."

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 108

Re: Gigabit Speeds

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I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Gigabit Speeds

Internet is not what I'm paying for.

 

We've been with rogers since 1973. Yup that's a long time. Rogers has always told us to upgrade our services to get more. We also have to pay more. We had 150 internet and rarely got the 150mbps speeds. Upgraded recently to 1gbps and now we are getting on average 300mbps. We are being told that's an improvement and we should be happy. Im not happy. Why am I paying for that service if you cannot provide it. The worst part if i go to the 500mbps I know it will drop to 250mbps or less. I'm going to the CRTC about this. It's called false advertising.

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Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 1,007

Re: Gigabit Speeds

Hello @Den03

 

Welcome to the Rogers Community Forums!

 

Not getting the speeds you are paying for is never a good feeling so we definitely want to look into this for you to see what could be causing the speed issues.

 

Firstly, we'd like to thank you for your loyalty to the Rogers brand for 45 years, that is quite an accomplishment! From what you've described its possible there could be a signal issue on your line and we'd like to troubleshoot this for you to find a solution and get your speeds back up to where it should be.

 

Please send us a Private Message to @CommunityHelps so we can get started on this for you. If you are not familiar with our Private Messaging system please click here.

 

We look forward to hearing from you!

 

RogersTony

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I'm Here A Lot
Posts: 6

Re: Gigabit Speeds

You may or may not have noticed, but perhaps more significant than Bell increasing their top speed to 1.5 Gbps earlier this week was that they *significantly* cut prices. IMHO Rogers needs to respond to remain competitive.

 

Bell now charges (regular prices, ignoring new customer promotional discounts) $100 per month for their 1 Gbps service - Rogers currently charges $153 per month for same. Plus Bell's offering is in fact far superior as they offer 940 Mbps upload whereas Rogers can only offer 30 Mbps on their current network.

 

It used to be that upload speeds didn't matter much. Those days are long gone, at least for heavy cloud users (of which I am one) so it seems to me that Rogers needs to *undercut* Bell's prices to make up for their lesser product.

 

I've been on Rogers Internet for about 4 years now, on the 250/20 plan. To date I've been very pleased with it, and I'm not really looking to switch. But I'm not going to pay more for less. So I plan to give Rogers a couple of weeks to consider their response, but depending on what I'm told when I phone it might be bye bye Rogers Internet hello Bell Internet/FTTH for me.

 

Dave Ings

 

 

 

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 108

Re: Gigabit Speeds

They also got rid of their mid tier speeds. It is now 25/25, 50/50, 1Gb and 1.5Gb

Switching to FTTH is a no brainer.

I'd love to come back to Rogers but not until they offer true FTTH, RFoG is acceptable to me.
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I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Gigabit Speeds

Rogers coda-4582U

 

Can anyone get higher then 300mbps on this modem wirelessly? What are your speeds wirelessly and wired? I think Rogers is not being truthful with there advertising. I cannot get 1gbps and I cannot surpass 300mbps wirelessly with my brand new $1500 I7 8750, 16gb ram, 128ssd laptop.

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Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,987

Re: Gigabit Speeds

@Den03 drill down into the laptop's Device Manager to see the wifi adapter name.  Copy that name and run a google search so that you can eventually find the specs for the adapter.  There is a very good possibility that your brand new very expensive laptop has a cheap 2 antenna wifi adapter onboard.  If so, then yes, it will severely limit the data throughput on wifi.  Unfortunately we keep running into this situation, again and again, brand new expensive laptop built with a cheap 1 or 2 antenna wifi adapter.  Not saying that's totally applicable here, but, given what we've seen in the past, I suspect that plays a large part in your disappointment.  

 

A couple of items to note:

1.  The 4582 only runs a maximum 80 Mhz bandwidth for 5 Ghz wifi channels.  

2.  If you look at the following Modulation and Coding index, http://mcsindex.com/, down the right hand 80 Mhz column, you can see the maximum connection rates available with a 400 nano-second guard time between broadcasts.  If the adapter doesn't support 400 ns guard times, then you're looking at the left hand 80 Mhz column.  

3.  Look specifically at the spatial streams column.  That column basically translates to 1, 2, 3, antenna, etc, etc.  Depending on how many antenna your wifi adapter supports, that will determine where on the chart the wifi adapter will run, in terms of the connection rates. 

4.  To determine the actual transfer rates, multiply the connection rate by the fraction indicated in the Modulation and Coding column. 

5.  To determine what connection rate your laptop is using, right click on the wifi icon at the lower right and select Open Network and Internet Settings.  Select View your network properties in the pop up Status page.  The link speed will show the wifi speed for a wifi pc/laptop, or, the wired connection rate for an ethernet connected pc/laptop.  Using that connection rate, and knowing how many antenna are installed in the laptop, you can then calculate the theoretical data rate that you will see.  As you walk around your home, that connection rate will change, based on the signal levels and signal to noise ratios.

 

That data rate will be the result of the modem settings, the signal levels and signal to noise ratios at both the modem and laptop.  Its up to the end user to optimize the modem settings and select the best operating channel based on who you're competing with.  Have a look at the following post, which contains settings that I recommend for modems and routers:

 

http://communityforums.rogers.com/t5/Internet/slow-wifi/m-p/399949#M47222

 

I need to update that post, but one addition that will be useful is another wifi scanner from Lizard Systems, which can be downloaded here:

 

https://lizardsystems.com/wi-fi-scanner/

 

You can get a freebie personal licence by following the get licence link for the wifi scanner on the following page:

 

https://lizardsystems.com/purchase/

 

Ok, so, give that a go.  Determine what you have onboard for a wifi adapter and see if its causing major limitations for your wifi performance.  Then, adjust the modem's wifi settings as suggested and change the operating channel to 149 or higher.  In this modem, there isn't much choice.  When you select the 80 Mhz bandwidth, the only selection for the higher channels is 149-153-157-161.  Select that channel group.  With third party routers, you would have a choice of the base channel, here, you don't, unless the modem automatically uses 149 as the base channel.  You really need to look at the channel usage with a wifi scanner to see whom else your competing with.  If you are competing with your neighbours that can cut your throughput rate rather drastically.  I've been keeping an eye on what channels my neighbours are using and running speed tests to see what differences there are.  Running an Asus RT-AC86U and a laptop (ultrabook), with my neighbours using a different channel, best I've seen recently is 650 Mb/s.  That laptop is most likely a two antenna laptop.  With my neighbours using the same channel, I'm down to just over 300 Mb/s.  Ugh..... So, despite my efforts to maximize the wifi throughput, and practically sitting beside the router, that same channel usage is a killer.  Only way around that is to buy a laptop with more antenna, or possibly use ubiquity access points.  From what I understand, Macbooks have three antenna, and from what I've read, I believe the only laptop with four wifi antenna is a gaming laptop which was released this year.  Other than that, its slim pickings.  

 

So, hope this puts the situation in perspective.  Despite spending a lot of money, and doing the most that one can do, you can still end up with less than expected wifi performance.  But, if you do some research, you'll understand why, and possibly what you can do to change that for the better. 

 

Also note, beamforming is not enabled on the 4582.  Beamforming might not make a huge change, but, if it was enabled, it might result in the modem - laptop connection rate running at one level higher, maybe even two if you're lucky.  Every little bit counts.  Multi-User MIMO?  No one really knows, other than the engineering staff.  So, if your laptop does support MU-MIMO, see if you have to enable that, and look for any improvements when it's enabled.



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I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Gigabit Speeds

I appreciate the advice. When it comes to networking I know what I'm talking about. I work for Dell for over 20 years selling to companies like ford and Chrysler. If I didn't know networking and hardware I wouldn't be employed. The new laptop has the latest 10/100/1000, mimo version. I can tell you when I use my dlink router wirelessly I get over 600mbps. Almost the same as I get wired. I'm also using a channel different then my neighbors. Apparently Roger's put a node on and will be fixing it today sometime. I guess we wait and see.