Gigabit Speeds

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I've Been Around
Posts: 1

Re: Gigabit Speeds

You are already lucky man, I upgrade from 100 and speed improvement is 30%, from 30M to 40M , It was a huge discount ( in speed )
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I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Re: Gigabit Speeds

I need to ask all those having gigabit speed issues. Do you have fiber to the home (FTTH). The reason I ask is that newer neighborhoods now have fiber optic cables right up to the house. And it seems only Bell and Rogers can/will install service there - so there is no love from guys like Teksavvy, Start of VMedia.  That means I am stuck choosing one or the other (which I do when the 'deal' of the ips I am with expires).

 

My current round is with cheap 500u service from Rogers. I am leaving Bell's symmetrical 300/300u service which had consistent 330u 310d speeds on speedtest. I would like to hear from those that are using Rogers' 500u and gigabit service on FTTH to see if they are consistent with Rogers' advertised claims.

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Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,987

Re: Gigabit Speeds

First question is, why are you leaving Bell's Fibre service, understanding the billing issues that Bell customers hate.  

 

As far as I know, the TPIAs are locked out of the fibre systems for the foreseeable future, unless the CRTC decides that Bell and Rogers must provide access to the fibre.  

 

Rogers fibre service is RFoG, which in a nutshell replaces the copper cabling that typically runs from the home to the local tap to the local node.  That cabling is replaced with a fibre system, with an Optical Network Terminal in the home.  The output of that ONT is fed to a modem via copper RG-6 cable, in this case the CODA-4582 modem which is the same modem that is used for 500 Mb/s and gigabit service.  Customers still have to put up with modem and CMTS issues as is typically found in the network today.  Only real benefit is the gain of what should be a reliable fibre connection versus the frequency and signal issues over copper.  

 

Bell's system is symmetrical as you pointed out, 300 down, 300 up in your case, or higher if so choose.  Rogers can only provide 500 down / 20 up or 1 Gb/s down / 30 Mb/s up, realistically over the traditional copper path, 930 - 950 down / 33 Mb/s up.  

 

The CODA-4582 is currently running DOCSIS 3.1 down, which provides the higher download speeds, and DOCSIS 3.0 up, which is where the bottleneck is.  No ISP is running DOCSIS 3.1 upstream other than possibly for a limited real world test.  Rogers is probably several weeks to several months away from running DOCSIS 3.1 upstream, which would or should allow higher upload rates.  I don't know if or when Rogers will be able to match Bell's symmetrical data rates.  Note that Bell has also indicated its plans to go to 5 Gb/s download next year.  DOCSIS systems can actually match that, but, its going to be a while before we see multi-gig DOCSIS systems employed by the ISPs.  I'd be pleasantly surprised to see that happen sooner rather than later. 

 

In terms of routing, from the complaints that I've seen, Bell routes thru Chicago and in many cases ends up with Comcast carrying a good portion of the traffic in the U.S.  Rogers uses Cogego for data carriage and as a result, much of the traffic ends up routing thru the U.S. as well.  There are complaints for both companies when it comes to data routing. 

 

So, hope this helps.  Personal opinion, if data upload rates are a concern, you're better off with Bell.  Routing wise, its a toss up, not sure which is worse.  Latency, I think that Bell wins, hands down.  It will be interesting to see what happens to the system latency when DOCSIS 3.1 upstream happens. 

 

Edit:  Also note, running VPNs thru the Hitron Puma 6/7 modem is problematic, as is streaming to services such as Twitch, Youtube and any others that use RTMP as a streaming protocol.



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I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Re: Gigabit Speeds

Thanks for the response. In order to get the best and cheapest services you have to switch providers at the end of each discount term and either go to the new provider or accept the old provider's 'loyalty' offers if they are palatable. I understand the differences between symmetrical and asymmetrical services. I don't run servers on my internet connect so a downgrade on the upload side is no problem - though for those times when I am uploading to my webhost I really liked having the high upload speeds. What it comes down to is what am I going to pay for that service. My bell service jumped up from $130/month to $225/month - time to find something cheaper. At the present Rogers is offering me their 500u + premier tv & (unnecessary but needed to get the bundle discounts) home phone for about $120/month - taxes in. When that discount runs out I will be looking back at Bell. Just the kind of things us retired guys have to do to save a few bucks per month. The reason for my question is that I have seen a lot of complaints about Rogers gigabit service not living up to anywhere near their claims. I will need this info for when the Bell's retention agent calls and tyries to keep my business - Bell's 300 service does indeed live up to their claims - at least in my FTTH home. I am looking for the same reality vs claim performance from Rogers when dealing with FTTH. I do know there are differences in demarcation (ONT) - Rogers is at the utility entry point in my wall going to a ONT->coax adapter, while Bell's goes straight to their modem that has a built in ONT.

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Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,987

Re: Gigabit Speeds

If that's the offer from Rogers, Bell should be willing and able to cut Rogers grass whenever and wherever possible.  Same in the other direction as well.  Won't know until you ask the question. 

 

Edit:  check your inbox for a message.  Select or click the number shown on your avatar at the upper right hand corner of the page when you're logged into the site.  Follow that link (number or avatar) down to your message inbox. 



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I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Re: Gigabit Speeds

I was told we need to combine wireless and ethernet to get full Gigabite speeds but when I search it up there is a paid app called speedify that's supposed to make that happen. But haven't tried it.
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I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Re: Gigabit Speeds

I am getting close to 400 mbps down and 30 to 50 up on my galaxy s7 5g. But dont think my phone will do over 500mbps. Not like I really need it to. But on my pc I have never seen over 400 on ethernet or 5g wireless.
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I'm Here A Lot
Posts: 6

Re: Gigabit Speeds

Try to use a different Ethernet card, my built in 1 Gbps network cards didn’t deliver the maximum speed. I had to use USB 3.0 Ethernet card to get 937~940 Mbps. USB 3.0 to Gigabit Ethernet Network Adapter with Usb3.0 3 Port Hub For Windows 10, Mac OS 10.10.x, Linux - KF010CA https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B01DEM8BB0?ref=yo_pop_ma_swf you also need to connect it to usb 3.0 port 🙂
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I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

Re: Gigabit Speeds

Totally agree , I did complain about the speed for a few time , on a good day I am 700 max , usually just sitting around 400 - 500. Although I don't usually check the speed but what is the point of gigabit if I don't get gigabit speed.

Bell offer FTTH rather then FTTN and similar price with rogers but I am with rogers for a long time and don't want the hassle of change.

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 108

Re: Gigabit Speeds

While Rogers struggles to deliver GB, Bell is rumored to be addinng a 1.5GB tier with the same 940mb upload sometime this month.

Rogers, accept defeat and start rolling out FTTH ASAP.