Second Gigabit Internet Connection at Same Address & Self-Install - Issues?

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Second Gigabit Internet Connection at Same Address & Self-Install - Issues?

Hey guys so I just purchase the GIGABIT internet with rogers to add it to my home (currently live in the basement) while the other family lives upstairs. I'm a bit concerned in regards to adding my modem and actually getting the signals and the download speeds i payed for as I've heard theres sometimes issues with having two rogers internet in the same household? there is a coax outlet down here not currently used. I also am doing self install to add it so I'm hoping there wont be issues

Has anybody experienced any issues or concerns?

thanks!

 

 

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Re: Second Gigabit Internet Connection at Same Address & Self-Install - Issues?

Although I'm not an expert on such matters, I do have the following comments.

 

1. If this is a separate account, then there should be no issues and Rogers should probably run a separate RF-coax line for your use.

 

2. If this is on the "same" account, then this would be called "account splitting" and is against the terms of service with Rogers and could result in suspension of both services.

 

3. Rogers rarely lets anyone use their own modem any more, especially for Gigabit service.  If this is a separate account you should be picking up (at a store) or receiving via tech delivery a modem specifically provisioned for your service.

 

If you could elaborate further on your plans, we can comment further, however, as stated earlier in my post, a "self install" in the same house, without a separate account ,and without a separate co-ax line, attempting to use your own modem is asking for trouble.



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Re: Second Gigabit Internet Connection at Same Address & Self-Install - Issues?

hey there @57! thank you for your reply.

 

This is completely on a separate account! i just rent the basement and I want my own internet but they also have Rogers. They will be shipping the modem and everything so I can self install.

Now you speaking about the co-ax line, what does that exactly mean?

 

I should just be able to install it myself once i receive it correct? i do have a coax on the wall that is not used.

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Re: Second Gigabit Internet Connection at Same Address & Self-Install - Issues?

I'm assuming this is a "house". 

 

1. There should currently be a single RF coax running to this house from the street?  Is this above ground or below ground?

 

2. Since this is a separate account, Rogers should really run a separate (second) RF-coax from the street to your basement.

 

3. I don't know if it would "work" to have a single line to the house and two separate accounts that meet the needs of both accounts.



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Re: Second Gigabit Internet Connection at Same Address & Self-Install - Issues?

yeah it is a house and i live in the basement underground. i currently have bell but i wanted to switch to roegrs because they have GIGABIT and bell only has 100 mbps. Now im not sure for the RF coax line since i dont really know where to look for that. as you mentioned there should be a second one... anyway i can check?

least thing i want is to install it and not work correctly, since i have no technician coming to install it or whatever

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Re: Second Gigabit Internet Connection at Same Address & Self-Install - Issues?

In a house the RF-coax usually comes into a panel called the demarcation point.  This is usually in a utility room near a fuse box or electrical panel or where the Bell line comes in.  The RF-coax either comes in overhead from the street, or underground to this demarcation point.

 

It's possible that you might be able to utilize the coax outlet you have, however, that I'm not sure of. For example, what if the person upstairs also wants Gigabit service?  I'm not sure if it's possible to provision two accounts/modems on a single line coming to the home.  This is beyond my level of expertise and should really have been discussed when you signed up with Rogers for the service...



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Re: Second Gigabit Internet Connection at Same Address & Self-Install - Issues?

okay thank you for the help! im gonna contact them over the phone.
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Re: Second Gigabit Internet Connection at Same Address & Self-Install - Issues?

@SebsAway the major potential problem are the signal levels.  But, first, a little explanation.  

 

1.  The status quo, if you will, which has been around for a good many years are the traditional cable driven modems, Home phone modems and TV nextboxes which is also a modem of sorts.  All of those require a cable connection, so, a single cable from the local tap will connect to a splitter or possibly a powered amp, to feed all of those modems.  The tricky point is the signal levels that each type of modem requires to operate.  Thats part science, part art and this is where a field tech will use experience and imagination to devise a cable system that works for all modems.  

 

2.  Now, Rogers is moving away from that status quo and employing a Comcast designed system to deliver an IPTV system to its TV customers.  That uses a single modem (cable connected) which in turn uses house ethernet and/or wifi to deliver data to the tv boxes.  This also provides phone service off of the modem, so, all three services from one modem, internet, phone and tv.  This is advantageous as it removes all of the previous modems and replaces it with a single modem, which does away with the previous problems of balancing signal levels within a customers house cable system. 

 

3.  Having said that, you can still sign up for the traditional internet service and receive a Hitron CODA-4582 modem running gigabit (download) data rates, realistically ~930 to 940 Mb/s.

 

So, the question at this point is what services are the family upstairs currently running and what splitter is currently employed to do that?   If there are several traditional services installed, you should be able to find the splitter where it connects to the inbound cable from the demarcation point.  Just how many ports are on that splitter will be an indication of the potential problems ahead.  Every time you run a signal of any type thru a splitter, the output of the output ports is reduced when compared to the original signal level.  Within limits thats ok.  Drop the signal level too far and you run into problems, at which point an amplifier might be required.  All of this depends on the original signal level prior to the splitter and the size of the splitter that is currently installed, if there is an existing splitter.  If there isn't an existing splitter, that will simplify the issue of signal dropping thru a two port splitter which you would need to install.

 

So, there are three approaches to the signal level problem.  

 

1.  Install a two port splitter on the incoming cable, one port goes to your modem, the other port connects to the other splitter, if it exists.  Doing this drops the signal level by 3.5 dB, or 56 %, compared to the incoming signal level.  While your modem will probably work ok, this might cause problems when the upstairs family are running their modems as there will be additional signal drops thru the existing splitter.  If there isn't an existing splitter, then the question is what are the original signal level prior to the new two port splitter and does the addition of a splitter drop the signal levels too much for either modem?

 

2.  There is room on the existing splitter, assuming that it exists.  The question at this point is what splitter is installed and what ports are already occupied?  Depending on the signal levels prior to the splitter, you might simply be able to connect to it and run your modem.  This is all signal level dependent.

 

3.  The signal levels on the cable simply won't support two users with separate modems.  In this case the question is, is there enough room on the local tap (pedestal or utility pole mounted) to run another cable to support your modem.  This requires a field tech to review the signal levels on the current cable and the condition of the cable and its connectors and come to a conclusion to run an additional cable and possibly replace the existing cable at the same time.  It is possible to split an output at the local tap but that probably isn't the preferred method.  Ideally the local tap has an unused port that could be used to support your modem.  

 

So, the question at hand is what splitter is currently installed, if any.  The preferred answer would be no splitters. 

 

Next question is, whats the splitter model, as seen on the front of the splitter and what ports are empty, if any. 

 

Thats the starting point, understanding whats already in place. 

 

Hope this helps. 

 



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Re: Second Gigabit Internet Connection at Same Address & Self-Install - Issues?

wow thank you so much for your reply. it was very informative @Datalink 

i can find out exactly what splitter if they have any upstairs. Im gonna be receiving my modem soon then see how it is then depending if i am having issues i can speak to tech about the signal levels and such. I am just hoping there wont be any issues as i heard there was a couple years back when there was rogers down here.

 

once again thank you!

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Re: Second Gigabit Internet Connection at Same Address & Self-Install - Issues?

Ideally there wouldn't be any splitter and the inbound cable would be connected to the house cable with an F-81 connector that looks like this:

 

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/ideal-3ghz-f-splice-adapter-10-pack-/1000751479

 

If thats the case, you would replace the connector with two port splitter which can be seen as the top splitter image on the following antronix pdf page:  

 

https://www.antronix.com/pdf/DS-1176-SS-A05_CMC4000-G2.pdf

 

Even with a simple two port splitter, signal levels are still a concern, but, we can have a look at them as they are presented to the user in the modem's STATUS .... DOCSIS WAN page.  That table can be copied and posted in a new post when you have the modem at home.  It doesn't contain all of the data for the modem's Orthogonal Frequency Division Modulation (OFDM) channel, but, the overview will show if there are any severe problems afoot.  

 

Note, if you're picking up the modem at the local Rogers store, ask them for a two port splitter if that suits the situation.  If you need a larger splitter, that might require a field tech to drop it off.  I don't know what splitters the Rogers stores might have on hand, but, I'm assuming that they would at least have the two port splitters on hand.