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What modems are offered with Rogers Internet Services

Alex4161
I'm a senior contributor

I currently have the Ignite 500 package with the white CODA modem.  I was wondering what modems are offered with the different speed packages.  Also, which modem is known to be reliable and offer good 5 GHz AC performance?  Although the CODA I am on seems to be decent, I wanted to know if there are others that are better.

 

Thanks

 

 

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Re: What modems are offered with Rogers Internet Services

RogersYasmine
Moderator
Moderator

Hi @Alex4161,

 

That's definitely a fair question. It's important to know all of your options to ensure you have the right equipment to support your services. 🙂

 

The CODA modem is the best and most advanced option available for your specific internet package. It is compatible with our Ignite 300u internet plan and above. For more information on the CODA modem and how to get the most out of your internet services, please CLICK HERE

 

For our lower tiered internet plans (Ignite 150u and below), we recommend the following modem types:

 

Rocket Wi-Fi Modem 

Advanced Wi-Fi Modem 

 

We do have other older models which are in use by some of our customers, however, they are not proactively offered anymore due to limited stock and availability.

 

I hope this helps! 

 

RogersLaura

 

 

 

 

 

 

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11 REPLIES 11

Re: What modems are offered with Rogers Internet Services

RogersYasmine
Moderator
Moderator

Hi @Alex4161,

 

That's definitely a fair question. It's important to know all of your options to ensure you have the right equipment to support your services. 🙂

 

The CODA modem is the best and most advanced option available for your specific internet package. It is compatible with our Ignite 300u internet plan and above. For more information on the CODA modem and how to get the most out of your internet services, please CLICK HERE

 

For our lower tiered internet plans (Ignite 150u and below), we recommend the following modem types:

 

Rocket Wi-Fi Modem 

Advanced Wi-Fi Modem 

 

We do have other older models which are in use by some of our customers, however, they are not proactively offered anymore due to limited stock and availability.

 

I hope this helps! 

 

RogersLaura

 

 

 

 

 

 

Re: What modems are offered with Rogers Internet Services

RoosterRuss
I've been here awhile

What is the difference between the CODA-4582 modem and the CODA-4582U modem?  Which one is newer, which one is better?

Re: What modems are offered with Rogers Internet Services

Hello @RoosterRuss!

 

Welcome to our Community!

 

Functionally they are the same. You won't gain any extra performance by switching models unless your current modem just so happens to be defective.

 

If you're experiencing any technical issues with your Internet service, feel free to PM us @CommunityHelps for further support. If you're not familiar with our PMing process, you can find instructions here.

 

Regards,

RogersCorey

Re: What modems are offered with Rogers Internet Services

RazaShah
I've been here awhile

I was using CODA modem with Ignite 300 package which was giving some problem. Now Roger sent me Rocket modem which I was using with Ignite 150 modem and I was asked to upgrade to get better modem and speed.

 

I am not sure what is going on, as per support CODA is not available and only option is Rocket modem. Anyone can help?

Re: What modems are offered with Rogers Internet Services

Good evening @RazaShah,

 

Welcome to the Rogers Community! I hope you're doing well and staying safe. 

 

Firstly, I'm happy we were happy to hear we could provide you with a replacement modem for the defective unit you had at home. Is everything working as it should at this time?

 

Don't hesitate to let us know if you need further assistance on how to return the previous hardware.

 

I hope your internet service is back up and running!

 

RogersMaude

Re: What modems are offered with Rogers Internet Services

Hello. What are some of the older rogers modem models. I have downgraded to 10Mb download and 1Mb upload. I want to buy a cheap modem that will work without having to pay 10$ a month for the modem I have now that I received when I had a 150Mb download. Thanks for your support.

Re: What modems are offered with Rogers Internet Services

57
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Rogers will not allow you to use your own modem. This has been discussed often on this forum.  The "cost" of the modem is actually built into the "package" whether it's line-itemized separately or not.

Re: What modems are offered with Rogers Internet Services

csum
I've been here awhile

i need help as im not tech savvy. Ive had ignite 150u planfor 5 years with rogers. Rogers now says its the "legacy" package. They told me they dont offer it anymore and have put me on there new "ignite" platform. it appears to me that the modem from 5 years ago and the new one on their website now is going to be the same based on the picture 2.4ghz/5ghz modem. so if the modems havent changed i cant see the interenet being any better with a new modem? any help is appreciated. i feel like its just to charge more for the same product based on reading some of the posts on this thread

Re: What modems are offered with Rogers Internet Services

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

@csum can you have a look at the back of the modem for the product sticker.  If you have a black modem, its most likely a Hitron CGN3xxxx series modem which is an Intel Puma 6 modem.  If you have a white Hitron CODA-4582 modem, its an Intel Puma 7 modem. 

 

There are a couple of newer modems in use now, with their own sub-models:

 

1.  The XB6 which is used for the Ignite TV service.  With this "XB6" title, are the Arris TG-3482ER which is an Intel Puma 7 modem, and the Technicolor CGM-4140COM which is a Broadcom BCM-3390 chipset modem.  Fwiw, these XB6 modems apparently have eight 5 Ghz antenna for the 5 Ghz wifi band.  I believe that there are four antenna for the 2.4 Ghz band, but, don't quote me on that one.  

 

2.  The XB7 which is now making its appearance on the Rogers network probably has two similar sub-models, but, don't quote me on that one.  I expect there to be the same Intel Puma 7 and Technicolor BCM-3390 modems.  No one has said anything to the contrary at this point.  This modem apparently has four antenna for the 5 Ghz band.  I believe that there are four antenna for the 2.4 Ghz band on this modem as well, but, don't quote me on that one.  This particular modem also has a 2.5 Gb/s port which will allow higher downstream data rates.  That 2.5 Gb/s is part of a newer ethernet standard which supports 2.5/5/10 Gb/s.  It appears that the implementation of that standard will be capped at 2.5 Gb/s for this modem. 

 

Fwiw, the newer modems, from the Hitron CODA-4582 modem up, are DOCSIS 3.1 modems, which means that their able to use Orthogonal Frequency Division Modulation (OFDM) in both downstream and upstream directions.  This is based on using thousands of sub-carriers to carry data instead of the traditional 32 channels downstream, and 3 or 4 channels upstream.  So, the newer modems are definitely more efficient and capable of higher data rates.  These should also be accompanied with lower latency to the neighbourhood node and beyond.  

 

At the present time Rogers is slowly enabling the OFDMA upstream channel, resolving problems as they come up with the rollout. 

 

Now, fwiw, the modem that you have will continue to function as it has in the past.  I don't expect you to see any change in performance except that the latency and response might actually improve as more modems are shifted over to OFDM and OFDMA channels.  Over time however, Rogers and probably every other ISP will probably want to shift all users to DOCSIS 3.1 modems to enable higher data rates and better utilization of the bandwidth all around.  In doing so, the traditional QAM channels, which your DOCSIS 3.0 modem uses will be reduced in number, dropping the data rates to those modems.  I don't expect that to happen for several years.  However, it appears that Rogers has notified the TPIAs that older 4 and 8 channel (downstream) modems will no longer be acceptable for new users on Rogers networks.  Current users I believe are grandfathered for now.  

 

So, technology is changing, there's no doubt about that.  Its in Rogers best interest, and that of its customers, to move all customers to DOCSIS 3.1 modems, but the question is, how does that happen?  Simply say to customers that you can't maintain your current plan and modem, and must upgrade at an additional cost (no surprise there), or offer the customers some incentive to move to a DOCSIS 3.1 modem.  It appears that Rogers has decided to take the first approach ......

 

Stop the presses:  Here's an announcement from Rogers concerning DOCSIS 3.0 and 3.1 modems.  I had thought this would be arriving someday, so, the drop dead dates appear to be cast in concrete at this point:

 

https://www.dslreports.com/forum/r33057810-Rogers-to-stop-supporting-Docsis-3-0-Dec-31-2022-2023

 

From that post:

 

ONLY certified DOCSIS 3.1 devices will be able to access the Rogers DOCSIS network after the dates below:

· Atlantic region – Effective December 31, 2022

· Ontario region – Effective December 31, 2023

 

So, your DOCSIS 3.0 modem will still be useable up to Dec 31, 2023, unless of course Rogers decides on different dates for its own modems, and that is possible. 

 

 

Re: What modems are offered with Rogers Internet Services

csum
I've been here awhile

Ya your right about the modem i have the black hitron currently. I've had it for 5 years. It was not specified what the new modem would be, and they couldn't answer the difference between the new one and the one i currently have will be. To your last comment about making everyone covert is true. My internet was good the first 2-3 years i had it. only the last 2 have been more inconsistencies so i wasnt sure if it was the modem or poor location. They located it centrally in the basement near the concrete foundation. I feel like it should have been located in the upstairs centrally instead. Less walls to go through? Another question my internet used to show two wifi connections regular 2.4ghz and 5g. they would both show up on the wifi network. the 5g has disappeared years ago. it was faster im pretty sure. but dont know why it dissappeared? know anything about that?

Re: What modems are offered with Rogers Internet Services

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Both wifi networks, 2.4 and 5 Ghz should be operating.  I'd reboot the modem to see if that does anything.  If that doesn't work, consider running a factory reset, which can be run from the user interface.  Log into the modem, navigate to ADMIN .... DEVICE RESET to Reboot or Factory Reset the modem.  

 

If you run a Factory Reset, you'll have to set the modem up once again.  Thats a bit of a pain, but, at the end of it, you'll know if the 5 Ghz network will run as expected.  If you have enabled the 5 Ghz network, and still don't see it, that probably means that the 5 Ghz transmitter has failed.  

 

Considering that the CGN3 modems don't support telephone systems, you can park that modem anywhere in the home where there is a cable port.  Ideally, the cable run from the basement would be an RG-6 cable.  If that modem is on a splitter, in the basement, and you have an unused cable port upstairs, you should be able to disconnect the modem, connect the appropriate cable to the splitter and park the modem upstairs, connected to the cable port in question.  Leaving the modem in the basement is the easy way out for the tech, but in reality, unless you use the basement very often, the modem should have been parked upstairs where you would get more benefit out of it.  It also depends on the ethernet network that the modem supports.  Traditionally all of the homes ethernet runs terminate in the basement at the structured wiring cabinet, but, thats not hard to deal with.  If you have a wallplate upstairs with a cable port and ethernet port, then you can connect the modem to that cable port, and one of the modem's LAN ports to the ethernet port to run back down to the structured wiring cabinet.  You would then have to purchase an unmanaged gigabit switch to park in or near that cabinet.  Connect all of the home's ethernet cables to that switch and you would have internet access in all of the connected rooms.  

 

For wifi monitoring on a Windows laptop or desktop, download Winfi Lite from:  https://www.helge-keck.com/

 

Thats probably the best, free, wifi scanner around these days.  Install that and fire it up to check out the modem's networks and see who you're competing with in the neighbourhood.  Sort the data by using the RSSI column, which is the received power level.  Select the RSSI column title to sort the data up or down.  Sort the data so that the column has data starting around -30, -40 dBmW at the top, -85, -90 at the bottom.  The RSSI scale is negative, with 0 dBmW at the top, -90 at the bottom.  The best you will do, with a wifi transmitter is around -25, -30 dBmW. 

 

The bottom graphical display will give you the graphical interpretation of the data.  Select the wrench icon on the second row near the right to bring up that display, and in that display, select "Spectrum" to see the graphical network display. 

 

I'd run Winfi Lite to see what the modem is transmitting.  If it really turns out that the transmitter has died, then there's not much choice in changing out the modem, unless of course you want to run the modem in Bridge modem and use a router to run both 2.4 and 5 Ghz networks. 

 

Edit:  is the modem sitting in the structured wiring cabinet in the basement?  If so, and the cabinet door is closed, then the modem would overheat, which would either cause the the transmitters or cpu to shut down or throttle, or, it could cause a failure.  These modems should be sitting in a location where they are ventilated.  Not active ventilation as in fan ventilated, but, simply open to their surrounding, not sitting in a closed cabinet.  The modems should also be sitting upright, not laying on their side. 

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