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New build townhome and cat5/6 rough ins

VitaminZ1
I've been here awhile

Hello,
We are moving from an apartment and we are looking to migrate our services to a new build town home and they have rough ins for a few cat 5 and 6 and cables (assume it’s tv?).

Is it possible for a technician to install the appropriate face plate to set up the cables, and the Cat 5 and cat 6’s? How do we get these set up?

We want to have the modem set up in the basement and run our internet directly through the Ethernet cables (cat 5 or cat 6).

Thank you,
Vit

 

 

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6 REPLIES 6

Re: New build townhome and cat5/6 rough ins

Pauly
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Hello VitaminZ1,

 

Let me try to answer your question as best as possible.  First and foremost, congrats on moving to a new Town Home. This must be very exciting time for you.

 

When you move your rogers services to your new home, the technician will install the modem in a location that you can suggest.  The technician also may suggest a suitable spot for the modem based on his or her or their experience in installations.

 

The basement is a great place to put a modem but you also must remember, that if  you are on the upstairs level of your house, you might experience wireless signal challenges, but if you are okay with that then go for it.

 

Depending on where you live, you might get a particular installation technician, its possible the technician may not be equipped with wall plates and Cat 5/6 Jacks, so you can kindly ask the technician if such is available, and if it can be provided.

 

You can also check if  your home builder already supplies the wall plates and Cat 5/6 jacks. In my house the builder supplied and installed them, otherwise you should be able to buy them and install them yourself.

 

One thing you might want to be aware of is depending on which Rogers Ignite modem you get, the mode might only come with 2 ethernet lan ports, so if you have more than 2 ethernet jacks in your house and want to connect them, you might want to consider buying an inexpensive ethernet switch.

 

Just to recap, the rogers technicians job is ultimately to install the modem in a suggested/preferred connection in your house, and connect the set top boxes wireless and make sure the signal works, if u have any preferred setup, you CAN do it, but the technician is not obligated to do this setup for you, they might if they have the knowledge and bandwidth to do it but it is usually not part of the installation procedure, so your mileage may vary.

Re: New build townhome and cat5/6 rough ins

VitaminZ1
I've been here awhile
Hi Pauly,
Thank you for your informative reply. When we did the PDI, we noticed it was like a capped outlet and when we asked, they mentioned we would have to install it, unfortunately. We assumed during the structural walk through where the wires were twirled around initially, they would be Ethernet cable ready for occupancy.

Where do you suggest we buy the face plates and cat 5/6 jacks, do you recommend a brand and or people that can install this? I had inquired with Roger’s tech and they mentioned they don’t install it…

We have 2 cat 6’s and 2 cat 5’s on the uppermost floor and 2 more cat 6’s on the lower levels.

I was hoping to have our own router for the upper levels since I WFH and rely on the strong Ethernet connection.

Thanks in advance,
Vit

Re: New build townhome and cat5/6 rough ins

@VitaminZ1, here are a few questions and points to consider:

 

1. There is a concierge move service that Rogers runs. You can give them a call to determine what the installation tech will do, or not do:

 

https://www.rogers.com/support/moving-your-services

 

Note that techs will not fish cables thru walls or floors and I don't believe that the techs will do all of the cable drops throughout the home.  That is typically a home owners responsibility, for all of the cable types available in the home, including fishing cables thru walls or floors if required.  I don't know if the techs have the connectors and crimpers on hand in order to install ethernet connectors on the Cat 5 or Cat 6 ethernet cables, I don't believe so.

 

In terms of the installation, Rogers techs will normally run a single RG6 copper cable, or fibre optic cable into the basement.  Typically, with RG6 copper cabling in the home, the tech will identify a corresponding RG6 cable that runs upstairs and connect the inbound Rogers cable with the cable run upstairs in order to install the modem upstairs.

 

Now, you indicated that you have Rogers services already and are looking to migrate those services to the town home.  If you're running Ignite TV service, you're probably familiar with the TV service's requirement to communicate with the modem via wifi, even if its connected via ethernet.  That does limit the ability to locate the set top boxes upstairs and modem downstairs, given the wifi requirement.

 

Do you know if the service in the town home is cable based or perhaps fibre optic?  That does make a difference as the fibre optic installation requires an Optical Network Terminal (ONT) located in the home, which is then connected to the modem or router via ethernet.

 

The ONT connects to the modem via the modem's port #4. That port is a combo Wide Area Network / Local Area Network (WAN/LAN) port with a maximum raw data rate of 2.5 Gb/s.  If you're currently on a Rogers 1.5 Gb/s internet plan, that port #4 will support that data rate into the modem, but, you can't get that data rate out of the modem as ports 1 to 3 are only 1 Gb/s ports.  So, with the ONT installed, connected to the modem's port #4, you're limited to 1 Gb/s over ethernet.  Wifi performance will depend on your device capabilities and the location of the modem, if you're depending on the modem for wifi services.

 

Now, fwiw, you can connect the ONT directly to a router, taking the modem out of the system.  Several Rogers customers have done this without any issue, including connecting to the set top boxes.  The only caveat is that the router has to run IPV6 to support the set top boxes.

 

Back to the question at hand.

 

1. The installation tech will probably only install connectors on the single RG6 cable that is required to run the modem. And, he might install a faceplate on the electrical box, but, I wouldn't guarantee that.

 

2. You can do the connector installations yourself and install the required faceplates on the electrical boxes.  I did that when we moved into our home many years ago, and I've coached a few Rogers customers thru the same process.  You would need to buy a few tools to do this. It isn't difficult.  It just requires a little time and patience.  If you have fibre cabling in a structured wiring bundle, then you would need to call someone in to install the connectors and test out the cable, end to end.

 

3. You can call in a local company or individual to install the required connectors and faceplates.  If you do an internet search for search topic such as:

 

residential telecommunication installation (your city)
data, network, phone cabling installers (your city)
structured cable installation (your city)
home network installation (your city)


In your case, with the cables already run to the drop point throughout the home, you're just looking for a tech to install the required Cat 5e, Cat 6, RG6 and possibly fibre cable connectors and test the final cabling to ensure that its serviceable and running up to its performance specification.

 

Do you happen to know if you have structured wiring installed?  That is a bundle that consists of RG6 for cable/satellite/antenna use, Cat 5e for ethernet or telephone use, Cat 6 for ethernet, and possibly one single-mode and one multi-mode fibre optic cable.  There are numerous variations on a theme, in terms of the mix of Cat 5e and Cat 6 cables.

 

Or, do you have single cable runs of the same cabling that you would find in a structured wiring bundle?

 

The cable types should have been specified in the building contract, if you had the town home built for you. It would have been included in the build specifications.

 

The type and mix of Cat 5e and Cat 6 cables brings about some possibilities to think about, including where the modem should be and considerations of using a router:

 

I'll return to this a little later. I have a few items to attend to before I can return to it.

Re: New build townhome and cat5/6 rough ins

Pauly
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Vitaminz

 

I order my cat5/6 inserts and wall plates from Infinite Cables in Markham Ontario.

I would get the standard 1 port wall plate and standard cat 5 or cat 6 insert jack, they make toolless ones where you do not need a punch down tool.

 

Also check where the drops terminate, if the builder left the wires unterminated chances are, the other end of the drops may need to be terminated with a cat5 or 6 insert jack

 

depending on how many runs you have, you can get a 6 port wall plate or a mini patch panel for the basement and terminate all the drops there, and then get a small switch and some patch cords and your set

 

 

Re: New build townhome and cat5/6 rough ins

VitaminZ1
I've been here awhile

Thank you Datalink.

 

Re 1. Note that techs will not fish cables thru walls or floors and I don't believe that the techs will do all of the cable drops throughout the home.  That is typically a home owners responsibility, for all of the cable types available in the home, including fishing cables thru walls or floors if required.  I don't know if the techs have the connectors and crimpers on hand in order to install ethernet connectors on the Cat 5 or Cat 6 ethernet cables, I don't believe so.
 
ANS: We are FTHB, so I’m trying my best to wrap my head around everything as we take occupancy next week. Thankfully they won’t need to fish any cables through the walls , as it’s already installed, but just left there in a bundle and capped.

___
 
Re: Do you know if the service in the town home is cable based or perhaps fibre optic?  That does make a difference as the fibre optic installation requires an Optical Network Terminal (ONT) located in the home, which is then connected to the modem or router via ethernet.

ANS: We emailed the builder and received the following:

In the basement, the yellow cord is a communication wire – it is a rough in to install your internet. This should be remedied once you have a technician install your internet.

I also inquired if a grey plastic box was installed and they confirmed:
A grey plastic box was installed – you should be able to connect with service provider of your choice.

___

 Re: The ONT connects to the modem via the modem's port #4. That port is a combo Wide Area Network / Local Area Network (WAN/LAN) port with a maximum raw data rate of 2.5 Gb/s.  If you're currently on a Rogers 1.5 Gb/s internet plan, that port #4 will support that data rate into the modem, but, you can't get that data rate out of the modem as ports 1 to 3 are only 1 Gb/s ports.  So, with the ONT installed, connected to the modem's port #4, you're limited to 1 Gb/s over ethernet.  Wifi performance will depend on your device capabilities and the location of the modem, if you're depending on the modem for wifi services.

ANS: Tbh, I’m not sure what we have. We have Ignite Internet 150 that has like 150 MBps download and 15 Mbps upload I believe. It also uses the Ignite Gateway Gen 2 (not sure if that helps).

____

Re: Now, fwiw, you can connect the ONT directly to a router, taking the modem out of the system.  Several Rogers customers have done this without any issue, including connecting to the set top boxes.  The only caveat is that the router has to run IPV6 to support the set top boxes.
 
ANS: Sorry what is IPV6?

____

Re: 2. You can do the connector installations yourself and install the required faceplates on the electrical boxes.  I did that when we moved into our home many years ago, and I've coached a few Rogers customers thru the same process.  You would need to buy a few tools to do this. It isn't difficult.  It just requires a little time and patience.  If you have fibre cabling in a structured wiring bundle, then you would need to call someone in to install the connectors and test out the cable, end to end.
 
ANS: Oh, I believe that is what we have.
For the cat 6, it reads on the APS:
CAT 6 wiring-R/IN 1 outlet. Wire run independently to the hydro panel
(no connections)

____

3. You can call in a local company or individual to install the required connectors and faceplates.  If you do an internet search for search topic such as:
 
residential telecommunication installation (your city)
data, network, phone cabling installers (your city)
structured cable installation (your city)
home network installation (your city)

ANS: oh we will try that. We are located in Ontario, GTA.

____

Re: In your case, with the cables already run to the drop point throughout the home, you're just looking for a tech to install the required Cat 5e, Cat 6, RG6 and possibly fibre cable connectors and test the final cabling to ensure that its serviceable and running up to its performance specification.
 
Do you happen to know if you have structured wiring installed?  That is a bundle that consists of RG6 for cable/satellite/antenna use, Cat 5e for ethernet or telephone use, Cat 6 for ethernet, and possibly one single-mode and one multi-mode fibre optic cable.  There are numerous variations on a theme, in terms of the mix of Cat 5e and Cat 6 cables.
 
Or, do you have single cable runs of the same cabling that you would find in a structured wiring bundle?
 
The cable types should have been specified in the building contract, if you had the town home built for you. It would have been included in the build specifications.

ANS:Our APS reads CAT 6 wiring-R/IN 1 outlet. Wire run independently to the hydro panel
(no connections). Installation as per attached floor plan. Specify
location on floor plan.

For the cable, not too sure about that one. I couldn’t find anything but did see it during the structural walk through.

However, they did tell us:
Pre-wired with two cable TV lines (we chose to put one in the living room and another in the master).

Would you advise we reach out to three builder about this to clarify? If so, what do you suggest we ask? Sorry for the dumb question.

____


The type and mix of Cat 5e and Cat 6 cables brings about some possibilities to think about, including where the modem should be and considerations of using a router:
 
I'll return to this a little later. I have a few items to attend to before I can return to it.

Re: New build townhome and cat5/6 rough ins

Pauly
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Hello VitaminZ1,

I am trying to explain to you in a way that does not have so much technical jargon and is easy to understand.

 

When Rogers comes to do the install,  They will take care of connecting and terminating any fiber optic lines (if provided) and coaxial cable wires and running the modem to the room of your choice,  They wont leave without setting up your iptv service, even if it means connecting the set top boxes wirelessly for now,  you can always change the connection to wired at a later time, it does not have to  be done the very moment the technician is in your house.

 

Depending on your level of knowledge and skill, what you are asking for is to smart wire your house which is a very reasonable ask, however rogers is not the company to handle those requests.

 

If its something you want to try yourself, by all means go for it, you don't even need tools now a days. if not, hire a company

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