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Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

MarynaT
I've been here awhile

Hi, I cannot find the option to change DNS to my custom DNS server on CGM4331COM which I recently received as a replacement for Hitron Coda. 

I'm using my own DNS server hosted locally with an ad filter and configuration for my local devices. Also, I don't want my DNS requests to be sent to Rogers or anyone else for privacy reasons. 

Could you please tell me how I can update my DNS IP address?

 

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Re: Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

-G-
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

@MarynaT wrote:

Could you please tell me how I can update my DNS IP address?


You can't.  The Ignite Gateways do not provide any such configuration option.  If you want to use a non-Rogers DNS service, you need to manually configure that into every computer on your internal network.

 

Your other option is to enable Bridge Mode on the Ignite gateway and install your own router/firewall.

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Re: Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

-G-
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

@MarynaT wrote:

Could you please tell me how I can update my DNS IP address?


You can't.  The Ignite Gateways do not provide any such configuration option.  If you want to use a non-Rogers DNS service, you need to manually configure that into every computer on your internal network.

 

Your other option is to enable Bridge Mode on the Ignite gateway and install your own router/firewall.

Re: Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

MarynaT
I've been here awhile

Wow, that's a huge downgrade tbh. I had everything set up perfectly fine with the older version of the modem and now I apparently need to buy a separate device because of this "upgrade". Honestly, I don't have any other explanation rather than Rogers wants to collect my DNS info since changing DNS was available for ages.

 

Appreciate the quick reply.

 

Re: Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

jbww
I plan to stick around

Disappointing! I was really hoping to configure the CIRA DNS Firewall once for my entire network.

Re: Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

MrAureliusR
I plan to stick around

I seriously cannot believe they have intentionally removed this feature. This is such a basic thing that users want to configure -- I'm on the verge of sending the "upgraded" modem back and just re-installing the previous one, which was working ABSOLUTELY fine with no issues whatsoever. I don't know why I let the agent talk me into getting a new modem.

 

And so much of the configuration HAS to be done through this god-awful HomeConnect app. Why?! I just want a default router config page, as has been done for the last THIRTY YEARS. There was absolutely no reason to change this. Now half the options are in the app, and half are on the config page. I've had this new modem/router for less than an hour and I'm already shouting at my computer and shaking my head in disbelief. I am not about to configure every SINGLE device on my network to use a different DNS server. This is just completely unacceptable. And now I need to pay more money to get a router to solve the problem. A problem which did NOT exist this morning, when my entire network was running smoothly and without issues.

 

It's things like this that make me seriously consider switching to another provider. Bell provides gigabit speeds for about what I'm paying for 150/30 with Rogers. Can anyone remind me why I'm still with Rogers?!

Re: Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

jbww
I plan to stick around

I believe this is where telecom regulators need to step in. Consumers are being forced to find, purchase, and support additional equipment and to become network experts in order to ensure their internet gateway and all their connected digital assets are secure even at the minimum level recommended by the US NSA. There is a another thread on bridge mode at https://communityforums.rogers.com/t5/Internet/Pros-and-Cons-of-XB7-in-Gateway-vs-Bridge-mode-with-m....   We, as a country, need to up our cybersecurity game.

Re: Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

-G-
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

@jbww  We asked about this years ago when Rogers hosted an Ignite TV "Ask the Expert" session and here is an official response from a Rogers Product Manager as to why we cannot configure an alternate DNS service:

 

I was hoping you guys would allow us to use custom DNS servers on the XB6 like on the previous Hitron Gateway. Is this something that is going to be made available with a future firmware update?

At this time, custom DNS servers aren’t compatible with the Protected Browsing and Parental Control features in Ignite Wi-Fi Hub.

Re: Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

jbww
I plan to stick around

@-G- Thanks for this. I'm wondering though if the technical details of "Protected Browsing" and "Parental Control" are published anywhere. How does the security and configurability compare with offerings with third party offerings such as  the CIRA DNS Firewall and OpenDNS ?

Re: Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

-G-
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

@jbww wrote:

@-G- Thanks for this. I'm wondering though if the technical details of "Protected Browsing" and "Parental Control" are published anywhere. How does the security and configurability compare with offerings with third party offerings such as  the CIRA DNS Firewall and OpenDNS ?


The only information available about these services are what you see on the FAQ pages:

https://www.rogers.com/support/internet/faqs-about-parental-controls-on-ignite-homeconnect

https://www.rogers.com/support/internet/advanced-security-faqs

 

The problem with both Parental Controls and Advanced Security is that you do not have any fine-grained control over them.  If any of your critical web sites get broken or blocked, your only recourse is to disable the services.  They work by providing bogus DNS responses for blocked sites, that redirect you to an error page.  However, they can also be bypassed with a VPN or iCloud Private Relay.  In my opinion, they are practically useless, and often cause more problems than they solve.

Re: Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

jbww
I plan to stick around

Thanks again for links. Agreed there's not much detail in the FAQs (such as who the third party is, how often their block lists are updated) and only binary control. It looks like the option is to block everything the un-named third party thinks is suspicious, or nothing. 

Re: Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

ve3nrt
I plan to stick around

I have recently noticed that my computers are being handed the domain name <host>.phub.net.cable.rogers.com, which doesn't resolve in DNS. Is there any way to stop this?  I don't see any benefit in having a non-working DNS name causing my Linux computers to blurt out error messages. If the DNS name actually worked, I'd be quite pleased, but as it stands it's annoying.

Re: Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

@ve3nrt sorry, there is no way to change the DNS address on these modems 😞

Re: Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

ve3nrt
I plan to stick around

@Datalink I thought as much, but I don't understand why my modem would assign a non-existent FQDN to anything on my network. It just breaks things. It also seems recent. Problems like this have cropped up in the last week or two, after 3 months on the Rogers service. 

Re: Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

LordDrakkon
I'm a trusted contributor

Anyone willing to set the DNS manually on each computer should make sure that there are no DNS leaks to the ISP.  Windows 10 and Windows 11 are bad for doing this with VPN's through the Smart Multi-Homed Name Resolution setting.  Make sure it is turned off.    

Re: Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

rwisenor
I've been here awhile

I totally get the frustration here. Being able to customize your DNS settings is a basic feature that many of us have come to expect. It's like buying a car and then finding out you can't adjust the seat.



First off, let's address the elephant in the room: Yes, Rogers and other ISPs are increasingly locking down these options. It's not just a Rogers thing; it's becoming an industry trend. But why? Well, ISPs are focusing more on security features, and sometimes that means standardizing settings to make them easier to support. It's a double-edged sword, really.

 

 

Now, I'm not saying it's all sunshine and rainbows. Far from it. But understanding the "why" can sometimes make the "what" a little less infuriating. And let's be real: What we had before was convenient, but was it private? For years, we've been handing off our digital privacy to ISPs. Time to reclaim it, folks. So, how can you make that happen?

 

 

Here are some steps to consider:

 

Own Your Hardware: The first step in taking control is owning your equipment. Get a standalone modem and a robust router that you can fully control. This way, you're not tied to the ISP's hardware limitations. So many routers offer a complete Open-Source solution these days and with a WiFi mesh network of your own, you’re golden.

 

Local DNS Server: Set up a local DNS server using software like Pi-hole or BIND. This allows you to have complete control over DNS queries, ad-blocking, and more, all within your local network. NextDNS is another great one but takes some learning.

 

Firewall: Invest in a good firewall solution. Whether it's a dedicated appliance or software like pfSense, make sure you can set granular rules and monitor traffic in real-time. Portmaster is another device specific option that I use but can take some learning to get right. Be honest, most of your thought what you had before was secure and private but did you know the protocol and network topology of it all well enough to say it stood the test of today’s cybersecurity risks?

 

VPN: A VPN isn't just for bypassing geo-restrictions; it's also a crucial privacy tool. Opt for a VPN service that doesn't log your data, or better yet, set up your own VPN server.

 

Network Segmentation: Separate your network into different VLANs for guests, IoT devices, and personal devices. This adds an extra layer of security and allows for more precise control.

 

Regular Audits: Make it a habit to regularly check your network for vulnerabilities. Tools like Wireshark or Nessus can help you spot potential weaknesses before they become a problem.

 

Education: Last but not least, educate yourself and your household. The more you know about network security and privacy, the better you can protect yourself.

 

By taking these steps, you're not just reacting to limitations imposed by your ISP; you're proactively taking control of your digital life. And honestly, that's where we all should be heading.

 

 

Honestly, my Rogers internet is literally providing the downstream and upstream and everything else is under my control. Ha-ha! My services work faster and my home network is secure, I can host my own servers of deployed apps, it’s great.

 

 

Privacy erosion is happening because standardisation necessitates it be so in order to please the common consumer. Don’t be common when it comes to your data and privacy, be a connoisseur of it. 🙂

Re: Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

ve3nrt
I plan to stick around

I ran a fairly simple system before being stuck with the inflexible Rogers modem, where I had dnsmasq doing dhcp and DNS caching, with google 8.8.8.8 as the downstream DNS server. Each computer, except the dnsmasq server, had a fixed IP handed to it by DNSmasq, along with its name, and my own ntp server. Now I have to configure host files on all computers that need to communicate with others on my LAN, and have various glitches because some utilities (sudo in particular) expect the computer's own FQDN to resolve to something.

 

I could use bridge mode as I've seen suggested, but that's an extra expense especially to replicate the WiFi. I appreciate the attention to security but doing so by taking away essential functionality seems counterproductive.

 

Thanks for the comments.

Chris

Re: Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

Lokatana
I've been around

Well, given DNS is down right now, and we can't do a thing about it other than painstaking reconfiguration of many IoT and Wifi devices... hours of work.... perhaps it's time Rogers fixed this dumb decision and gave us customers back the ability to configure DNS servers of our own choice.

Re: Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

Polish_Eagle
I've been here awhile
Agreed, I'd love to be able to put my own DNS server IP within the configuration. It would avoid issues like today when Rogers went down as I have a system with multiple DNS addresses for redundancy.

Re: Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

Tempystral
I plan to stick around
Is it possible to own your own modem anymore? My understanding was that Rogers no longer supported bringing in your own modem, even for cable connections.

We shouldn't need to do this at all, mind. It's unacceptable for such a necessary service to be so bad and still raise prices every year.

Re: Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

@Tempystral nope, its been a long time since Rogers allowed customers to own their very own Hitron CGN3.  Those days are long gone.  So, now, the modem cost is built into your internet plan. 

 

Unfortunately, Canada doesn't have legislation in place which allows ISP customers to own their own modems. 

Re: Change DNS IP for CGM4331COM

Mkadoura
I've been around

OpenDNS should be a great option and you wouldn't need to make any changes on your router.

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