Rogers Outdoor Pedestal

Need Help?

That's what we're here for! The goal of the Rogers Community is to help you find answers on everything Rogers. Can't find what you're looking for? Just ask!
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply
Highlighted
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Rogers Outdoor Pedestal

Hello!
I am having a house built and just found out that there will be a Rogers cable box on our lot. I am concerned about this as my neighbour’s pedestal burst into flames last year after being serviced (I guess the heat gun was used and some debris caught on fire). The fire started about an hour after it was serviced but thankfully a neighbour noticed it.

I’m just wondering if these pedestals are generally a fire hazard. My child’s bedroom will be pretty close to this area so I just want to double check.

Thank you!

 

*Edited Labels*

Highlighted
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 1,845

Re: Rogers Outdoor Pedestal

Hello, @Pihc11.

 

Welcome to the Rogers Community Forums! 🙂

 

Your safety and security is a top priority to us. The concern you have raised is understandable; the pedestal that houses the distribution cables is generally considered as a passive connection point. The coax cables carry RF signal with a negligible current and it's safe to touch.

 

Rest assured, the pedestal itself cannot produce sparks to be deemed as a fire hazard.

 

@Datalink may have more info on this matter. 

 

Cheers,

RogersMoin
 

Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 14,246

Re: Rogers Outdoor Pedestal

I would have to tend to agree.

Sounds like the issue that happened there, was more of an install error.  That the tech which was doing something was what caused it.

As mentioned above, there is minimal charge on the lines, even less than on a telephone line if I am correct.

Nothing that would be a general problem.

No more so than ANYTHING in your house, the always possible potential for something running power to fail, spark, etc.



Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,986

Re: Rogers Outdoor Pedestal

@Pihc11

 

Not that I know any more about these, but, are we discussing the plastic pedestal that one usually sees in the front yard of some homes?  These are about 16" x 16" square and roughly waist high?  If so, there's not much to it.  There's an inner steel mount to hold the local tap (splitter) and 4 or 6 RG-6 cables, roughly three to four feet long, and a much larger cable, don't know the cable type, again, roughly three to four feet long.  That's it.  This runs at a fairly low voltage.  To get this thing burning, it would take a lot of heat but it wouldn't last long as there isn't much to burn.  After the cover burns up, there's hardly anything left to burn.  I would say that the bigger risk would be from an adjacent grass fire in a very dry season

 

Now if you're talking about the local node which is about 3' x 3' or slightly larger, that's a different matter altogether.  That's a powered box with circuit cards and backup battery.  If that starts to burn there is a lot more combustible material to it.  Don't know what type of battery is used, but if you're able to burn the battery, it would have to be a fairly hot fire. 

 

I doubt that there is much of risk in either case.  There are millions of these around North America and beyond and you don't normally hear of fires associated with these installations.  They run 24/7 though the hottest days of the year, year in year out, and keep operating without burning up.  Maybe the maintenance staff would have a different perspective as they would be familiar with cases that they might have seen or heard about.  

 

Now, since we're on the subject, let me put a plug in here for structured wiring.  You're building your dream castle, are you running structured wiring to every room where you might, or could use cable/ethernet/telephone services?  Structured wiring is a bundle usually consisting of two RG-6 cables for cable or satellite tv, one Cat 5e for ethernet and one Cat 3, possibly another Cat 5e for telephones.  Newer bundles these days might also include one or more fibre optic cables and possibly speaker cables.  Usually there is one run from the Structured Wiring Cabinet in the basement or utility room, to each room where any of these services might be required in the future, so each room has its own cable run from the Structured Wiring Cabinet.  I've lost count of the number of posts that I've seen where new home owners have decided to forego this installation, assuming that wifi will do it all.  After moving in, they discover that the wifi plan doesn't work as they're fighting with the neighbours for clear wifi channels.  At the end of the day they end up looking for alternate ideas, including using MoCA adapters which use the installed RG-6 cables, or powerline adapters which use the electrical system in the house.  Both can work but they're nowhere near as good as having cable runs to the various rooms which contain both RG-6 and Cat 5e or Cat 6 ethernet cables.  These days, with ever increasing data rates, strong consideration should be given to Cat 6, Cat 6a or fibre runs.  Any entertainment or office area should probably have at least two runs or extra Cat 6/6a runs to provide sufficient data rate capability.  You don't necessarily have to finish the whole installation, as in install all of the cable keystones and wallplates.  You might choose to only install those as you need them, but, moving heavy furniture around down the road can make that a bit of a challenge.  So, for some areas, it might make sense to complete the installation in the event that those connectors end up sitting behind heavy, or bulky furniture. 

 

If you choose not to install structured cabling, then low voltage conduit should be the next consideration.  Providing a run to every room from the Structured Wiring Cabinet will give you the flexibility down the road to pull whatever cable or fibre you need to the various rooms.  That conduit can be seen in the following link:

 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Carlon-3-4-in-x-100-ft-ENT-Coil-Blue-12007-100/100404116

 

So, if you've already planned for this, hurrah, two thumbs up.  If not, please give this some consideration.  It will definitely pay off down the road 🙂



Highlighted
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Rogers Outdoor Pedestal

Thank you everyone for the responses! It is the tall green one that comes up waist high. I’m happy to hear that I don’t have to worry about the pedestal randomly exploding or anything lol.

I do still have a bit of a concern that something may happen after it’s been worked on. Do they generally use heat guns when they are servicing the box? Or is it more of just moving wires, etc?

I guess you’re right though Datalink, worst cause if it ever did spark a flame it would probably just melt the case and wires inside. I plan on having the fire detection service through Rogers as well once we move so that should give me extra peace of mind.

I will mention the installation you suggested to my husband! He is much more into that stuff than I am lol!

Thanks everyone for helping me calm down a bit. This deal is firm and I have been really stressed about moving to a home with a potential hazard right out front. I really appreciate the feedback!
Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,986

Re: Rogers Outdoor Pedestal

Using a heat gun is definitely a rare occurrence I'd say.  Perhaps the tech was trying to dry out the ports on the local tap??  Just guessing.  Usually the only reason to open that cover is to connect/disconnect cables or install new connectors onto the cables, which is done with a manual crimping tool.  

 

I have one of those just off my driveway and I never give it a second thought.  On the other hand, if it was to miraculously catch on fire, perhaps it would take out the Bell pedestal which is right beside it.  It would be a pity if Bell then had to run fibre to replace the nearly 20 year old telephone cabling.  Yup, a real shame if that were to happen, lol.



Highlighted
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Rogers Outdoor Pedestal

Lol!! Ok, if you have had one for a number of years and it hasn’t burned down your house I will trust that we should be ok lol.

I’m hoping we only have the one pedestal but who knows what else may pop up haha.

Also since you live beside one; do they ever service it at night? Or is it more of a day time thing?
Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,986

Re: Rogers Outdoor Pedestal

Normally the techs are around during the day, but, that's not to say that a tech wouldn't be working into the evening sometime, if that was the only time that a customer might be at home.  

 

That box holds a rather large splitter, which is fed from the neighbourhood node.  That splitter, or local tap to be more precise usually services around 4 to 6 homes.  If you look down the street, in both directions, between 4 to 6 homes in either direction should be another pedestal which services the homes to their immediate left and right. 

 

Edit:  @Pihc11 on a slightly different note, your property will have an easement that allows companies such as Rogers, Bell, the power company and others to access your property.  Know where those easements are.  As far as I'm aware, no company has the right to cross your property at will, outside of those easements, that includes the property itself and the house, and by crossing, that includes access to, or using the property or house in some fashion to run cabling.  There have been numerous posts concerning techs running cables over trees, and rooftops for the purpose of crossing the property.  Temporary cables for other neighbours can be a pain, but are necessary at times when the underground cable becomes unserviceable.  It can take weeks to get the necessary dig permits and location services done in order to bury a new cable.  Those cables don't last forever and have to be replaced every once in a while.  Fwiw, we're on our third cable.  When it comes to running temporary and permanent cables for your neighbours, they can be laid in such a fashion that they don't become a hazard, to you, your family or your neighbours.  This takes a little cooperation on everyone's part when that situation arises, but, know where those easements are, and know your rights.  



Highlighted
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Rogers Outdoor Pedestal

Thanks for the info!

Random question for you: there is another lot we can go with that doesnt have a box but it does sit at the end of the cross street so the stop sign would be right across from our house. Having lived through it yourself, would you rather deal with the annoyance of cables or headlights?

Thanks!
Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,986

Re: Rogers Outdoor Pedestal

hmm, interesting question.  Personal opinion, the cabling is not an issue if the techs do it right.  If you've picked a quiet part of the neighbourhood, I'd rather be on that lot instead of sitting across from a stop sign.  

 

Usually what will happen is that the cabling for your neighbours should run back towards the road, then along the side of the curb, left or right to your neighbours yard, where it could take a short cut to the ingress point.  So, its out of sight, our of mind, so to speak.  If you pave the driveway and a neighbour's cable needs replacement at some time in the future, across the driveway, the bury crew will cut a groove in your driveway, just where it meets the curb, bury the cable as it crosses the driveway and fill the cut with rubber compound to seal it.  So, you won't know that its been done.  For the most part this isn't an issue, just depends on the tech who has to run a temporary cable some day.  

 

This is just a minor annoyance every once in a while.  Don't let it stop you from building on you're preferred lot.  Congrats by the way, new house, lots of fun down the road.....