Losing IPv6

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Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,294

Re: Losing IPv6

Maybe it was just a bad modem.  Something may have been overheating, causing a failure after a period of time.  I think the problem now is that you've probably lost 802.11ac capability for the wifi networks, which will affect your wifi throughput rates.  If that's important I'd exchange the CGN3ROG, (which is the first Roger's Hitron Puma 6 modem) for another CGN3ACSMR or CGNM-3552.  The CGN3ACSMR is a 24 channel downstream modem, the 3552 is a 32 channel downstream modem.  Both of those are Intel Puma 6 modems. 



I'm a Reliable Contributor
Posts: 186

Re: Losing IPv6

Thank you.   Ya, I noticed that about AC, but my Rogers store when I called, the employee said they only have CGN3ROG or the Gigabit modems.   I didn't want to argue because I have to switch my bundle in January anyway, so I will try this modem for now.

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 271

Re: Losing IPv6

I have a bit different problem.  I recently lost IPv6 to my LAN, though my I do get proper IPv6 addresses.  I have the Hitron modem in bridge mode and pfSense firewall/router.  I can ping www.yahoo.com, using IPv6, from my firewall, but not any computer behind it.  When running Wireshark, between the modem and firewall, I can see the pings and replies, when I ping from the firewall, but only the outgoing pings from a computer behind the firewall.  The only significant difference between pinging from the firewall and computer behind it is the prefix portion of the address.  This would seem to indicate a routing problem, in that the replies are not making it back to my network.  Has anyone else experienced this?  I called support today, but even the supervisor didn't seem to know what to do with this, even though I told him it would have to be handled by someone in the Network Operations Centre (NOC).  I'm on the Wolfedale NOC in Mississauga.

 

Also, this problem happens with both Linux & Windows and two different computers, so that rules out the computers as being the cause of this problem.

 

 

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 271

Re: Losing IPv6

I have noticed another issue with this.  When I do a host lookup for my WAN host name (the one that ends with cpe.net6.cable.rogers.com) , I get 2 IPv6 addresses, when there should only be one.  The correct one starts with xxxx:xxxx:xxx:93: and the wrong one starts with xxxx:xxxx:xxx:90:

 

(Removed IP addresses - RogersTony)

Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 258

Re: Losing IPv6

Hey @JKnott,

 

I can understand the concern as well as the limitations here, it does sound like the issue may be coming from the IPv6 settings within pfsense, assuming no issues on the gateway side. It's admittedly been a little while for me since I've set up pfsense but there's potential for issue in a few areas. Can you list out the pfsense settings for your IPv6? (Be sure to block out any personal IP's).


From a more specific standpoint, are you using RA or DHCP6 to assign IPv6 to your LAN?
What have you set as your prefix delegation size?
Have you selected "Only request an IPv6 prefix"?

With this information perhaps someone within the community  may have some insight :).

Regarding the additional IPv6 address, it's been edited out for privacy reasons but if you'd like to confirm the specifics you're seeing you're welcome to send me a PM @CommunityHelps.

 

RogersAndy

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 271

Re: Losing IPv6

Actually, it has nothing to do with pfSense.  I have been using it for almost 3 years and this is a very recent problem.  Also, the symptoms have nothing to do with pfSense.  Fore example, the host lookup result comes from a DNS server that seems to think my firewall has 2 addresses.  There is nothing in pfSense that can do that.  As for the ping problem.  I used Wireshark, a network analyzer app, between my modem and firewall.  It showed the pings from the computer going out, but not getting a response.  The pings that failed originate on a computer behind the firewall and I tried on 2 different computers, with both Linux and Windows 10.  All failed.  Pings from the firewall computer did receive a reply.  This sort of problem is generally a problem with the return routing.  The main difference between the firewall and computer pings is the network prefix, so there could be a routing error that affects one prefix, but not the other.  I don't know if the two issues are related, but it seems suspicious.  I had not seen either prior to this.  Another thing I tried was to tether my notebook computer to my cell phone, so that it would not pass through my network.  I then ran a traceroute to both my firewall and a computer behind the fireall.  While not all the hops showed an address, the two traceroutes appeared to differ.  A trace route to a computer must pass through the route to my firewall, which means the two traceroutes should not be so different.  Also, I tried that host lookup, while tethered and got the same results as before, that is two addresses for my firewall.

 

BTW, I am a Cisco CCNA and have very good knowledge of networks and how they work.

 

Also, you changed the wrong part of the address for privacy concerns.  Those addresses only identify that it's part of Rogers address space.  The part I omitted, that could be used to identify me, contains 2^64  or 18.4 billion, billion addresses, so someone would have to do a lot of guessing to find me.

 

I just noticed something very disturbing.  I called Rogers support yesterday and it appears someone reset the modem to gateway mode.  They shouldn't be doing that without letting the customer know.