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How do I hook up my own Eero

josefstevens
I've Been Around

I have Ignite internet 500u, Ignite TV premier using the Xb86 modem. I purchased my own Eero Pro and beacons but cannot find instructions for installation. I get that Rogers offers their own service with the Eero, but all of my searching for a self install leads to a dead end. I am no tech head but I also do not fear self install with clear directions and one of the chief concerns is that Rogers own instructions for placing the modem in bridge mode indicate that TV service will be lost if this is done. What is the work around for this, i.e. they must do this for their own wall to wall service?

Is there anywhere I can find clear, step-by-step instructions to set this up or am I at the mercy of a Rogers installer?

 

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9 REPLIES 9

Re: How do I hook up my own Eero

-G-
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

@josefstevens wrote:
I have Ignite internet 500u, Ignite TV premier using the Xb86 modem. I purchased my own Eero Pro and beacons but cannot find instructions for installation. I get that Rogers offers their own service with the Eero, but all of my searching for a self install leads to a dead end. I am no tech head but I also do not fear self install with clear directions and one of the chief concerns is that Rogers own instructions for placing the modem in bridge mode indicate that TV service will be lost if this is done. What is the work around for this, i.e. they must do this for their own wall to wall service?

Is there anywhere I can find clear, step-by-step instructions to set this up or am I at the mercy of a Rogers installer?

When Rogers performs an eero installation, they do not put the XB6 gateway into bridge mode.  They install the eero mesh and configure it with a different Wi-Fi network name, put the eero into bridge mode, connect the set-top boxes by Wi-Fi to the eero mesh system, then disable Wi-Fi on the XB6.

 

To connect the Xi6 set-top box to a different Wi-Fi network, press and hold the "Exit" button on the remote for three seconds, then key in: "⬇️ ⬇️ 9 4 3 4"



Re: How do I hook up my own Eero

-G-
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

@josefstevens  I found some additional information that will hopefully provide you with guidance on how to get your eero mesh up and running.

 

The eero mesh can work in one of two modes.  By default, it is a smart Wi-Fi router.  The Hub (eero Pro) connects to a simple modem and provides network connectivity for all devices in your home.  The eero can also be placed into bridge mode where it simply provides Wi-Fi connectivity, and improves (and typically replaces) the Wi-Fi functions on a modem/Gateway, such as the XB6.

 

Rogers deployed the eero mesh in situations where the XB6 cannot provide sufficient Wi-Fi connectivity, typically in larger homes and homes with challenging layouts.  The XB6 was specifically designed to work with the other Ignite TV components.  For that reason, Rogers continues to run the XB6 in Gateway mode (i.e. with Bridge Mode disabled) and uses the eero mesh only for its Wi-Fi capabilities.

 

Rogers provides the following setup instructions, just in case anyone were to accidentally factory reset the eero hardware: https://www.rogers.com/customer/support/article/setting-up-eero-after-move-factory-reset

 

Rogers also has some support articles on how to install and use the eero app, make some basic configuration changes, and some additional setup and troubleshooting tips:

 

https://www.rogers.com/customer/support/article/faqs-about-the-eero-app

https://www.rogers.com/customer/support/article/how-to-change-your-eero-network-name-and-password

https://www.rogers.com/customer/support/article/diagnose-issues-reset-and-set-up-eero

https://www.rogers.com/customer/support/article/fix-slow-eero-network

 

eero also provides a wealth of information on their main website and their Support website.

 

Keep in mind that the Rogers and eero setup instructions are rather contradictory.  eero wants you to put the XB6 into bridge mode (turning the XB6 into a simple modem) and use the smart features of their hardware.  Rogers wants you to do the reverse.  While eero's setup instructions will probably work, Rogers only officially supports using Ignite TV with the XB6 in Gateway mode.



Re: How do I hook up my own Eero

Sailorman
I Plan to Stick Around

I’m looking into Rogers Ignite TV and internet. I’m currently using Rogers legacy internet with a CODA modem in bridge mode and 2 EERO Pro 6’s. Is it possible to put the Ignite modem in bridge mode and use the EERO’s in the same way for WIFI and ignite TV. Are there instructions on how to set up. My house is an older home and wifi is much improved with the EERO Pros on different floors. 

Re: How do I hook up my own Eero

Sailorman
I Plan to Stick Around

My question was added to this thread by the moderator so I've now had a chance to read through. Unless I'm missing something this looks like a pretty complex process. I was hoping I could put the new Ignite modem into bridge mode and use it as the gateway, and connect my Erro Pro 6 and use it as the modem.

 

I'm not sure from the extensive discussion whether it's even possible to put the ignite modem into bridge. I'm on a cable install so not sure.

 

Can someone clarify what's involved? I don't want to commit to Ignite and find out my Erro Pro 6's can't be used.  

Re: How do I hook up my own Eero

-G-
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

@Sailorman wrote:

My question was added to this thread by the moderator so I've now had a chance to read through. Unless I'm missing something this looks like a pretty complex process. I was hoping I could put the new Ignite modem into bridge mode and use it as the gateway, and connect my Erro Pro 6 and use it as the modem.

 

I'm not sure from the extensive discussion whether it's even possible to put the ignite modem into bridge. I'm on a cable install so not sure.

 

Can someone clarify what's involved? I don't want to commit to Ignite and find out my Erro Pro 6's can't be used.  


It should work but it's a totally unsupported configuration from a Rogers perspective.  That's why there are no instructions on how to set up Ignite TV with third-party, customer-owned equipment.

 

Ignite TV was designed to work with the set-top boxes connected to the Ignite gateway, either directly via Ethernet or Wi-Fi or through an Ignite Wi-Fi Pod. It's a turnkey solution and all of these components were designed to work together.

 

It's technically possible for Ignite TV to work over third-party network gear.  However, Rogers will not provide technical support for any issues when Ignite TV is running over your own network gear and/or with Bridge Mode enabled on the Ignite gateway.  You need to be prepared to revert your network back to a Rogers-supported configuration before calling in for any support issues.

 

If you, instead, put your eero mesh into bridge mode, it's still technically unsupported from a Rogers perspective but at least it is more like a previously-supported configuration.  (Rogers still supported me when I used a used a Linksys mesh for Wi-Fi connectivity.)  The one thing that I am unsure of is whether or not you can still disable WiFi on the Ignite gateways anymore... or if you do, whether the Ignite WiFi Hub will turn it right back on again.  Perhaps the @CommunityHelps  team can provide some clarification.



Re: How do I hook up my own Eero

Sailorman
I Plan to Stick Around

Thanks for the info.

 

Are there instructions anywhere outside of Rogers on how to put the Ignite modem into bridge mode and to revert back to a normal supported Roger's install. Can I assume Roger's tech support would help restore the configuration to a standard Roger's install?

 

I'm not keen on putting the Eero's into bridge mode as I understand I would lose the features that these have to offer. And I've been told having both the ignite and Eero modems with wifi activated wouldn't provide very good results. 

 

Does anyone else following this thread know whether or not you can disable WiFi on the Ignite gateways anymore... and  if you do, whether the Ignite WiFi Hub will turn it right back on again

 

Suggestions and advice are much appreciated.  

 

 

 

 

Re: How do I hook up my own Eero

-G-
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

@Sailorman wrote:

Are there instructions anywhere outside of Rogers on how to put the Ignite modem into bridge mode and to revert back to a normal supported Roger's install.


Enabling/Disabling Bridge Mode on an Ignite gateway is easy.  Simply log into the modem with a web browser and you will find a button to enable/disable Bridge Mode right on the main landing page.

 

I started a thread where the Community can go to for configuration tips on how to get Ignite TV working with customer-owned network gear: https://communityforums.rogers.com/t5/Ignite-TV/Using-the-Ignite-TV-Modem-Gateway-in-Bridge-Mode/m-p...

 

I strongly advise that you get Ignite TV working first in a Rogers-supported configuration, with the set-top boxes connected directly to the Ignite gateway, then develop a plan to switch over to your own equipment.  The trickiest part is that you will need to configure the same WiFi SSID/passphrase in both the Ignite gateway and your own network gear, then disable WiFi on the Ignite gateway.  Yes, this sounds crazy but if you do not, you will probably find that the set-top boxes get unhappy and will constantly drop off of WiFi.

 

I never created a step-by-step install guide.  Everybody's setup will be unique and all gear (including Rogers') will have quirks that you will need to deal with.  You will need (at least moderately sophisticated networking skills) to support yourself so, if you cannot figure out how to adapt high-level generic instructions to your own gear and your own installation, and develop your own transition plans to and from a Rogers-supported configuration, you probably should not be attempting a non-standard Ignite TV installation.

 

Can I assume Roger's tech support would help restore the configuration to a standard Roger's install?


Rogers will not be able to assist you in switching back to a supported configuration.  Basically, all that you need to do is disable Bridge Mode and reconnect the set-top boxes to the gateway, as you would in a normal installation.  When you call in for support, Rogers needs to be able to run their standard diagnostic tests.  With a firewall running on your eero, Rogers will not be able to poll the set-top boxes.

 

I'm not keen on putting the Eero's into bridge mode as I understand I would lose the features that these have to offer.  


Understandable.  Also keep in mind that if Rogers should ever install their next-gen fibre-to-the-home service in your area, you will not be able to run your Ignite gateway in Bridge Mode.

 

And I've been told having both the ignite and Eero modems with wifi activated wouldn't provide very good results. 


You can't really avoid this because even in Bridge Mode, WiFi is still enabled on the Ignite gateways, and there are internal services (including some that are still used by the Ignite TV set-top boxes) that are bound to those hidden WiFi networks.

 

 

 

If all this sounds too onerous, keep in mind that you would be in the same situation with Bell.  They don't support running Fibe TV on customer-owned network gear either, and they are going out of their way to make it next to impossible to bypass their HomeHub gateways.



Re: How do I hook up my own Eero

Sailorman
I Plan to Stick Around

Thanks for the detailed response. It sounds like my proposed configuration has some challenges. I guess an option for me would be to go with a provider like TekSavvy and their television streaming option run through supported devices. Bell isn’t a great option here, but I haven’t given up on Rogers yet.  A couple of questions:

 

1. If the Ignite modem in bridged mode still has to use WIFI to connect to the Ignite set-top boxes, won’t this cause a conflict with the EERO’s also on WIFI resulting in poor WIFI reception.  Is there a way to work around and avoid. 

 

2. How much range does the Ignite modem have to connect the TVs.  I’m worried we might have reception issues if the Ignite modem is on a different floor than the TVs. The reason I added the Eero Pro 6’s was because of dead spots in my house.  Should I be concerned. Any stuttering reboots would be a drag.  

 

3. I’m not too worried about Rogers installing next Gen fibre network anytime soon here,  It’s possible but there might be more TV streaming options later too.   

Re: How do I hook up my own Eero

-G-
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

@Sailorman wrote:

Thanks for the detailed response. It sounds like my proposed configuration has some challenges. I guess an option for me would be to go with a provider like TekSavvy and their television streaming option run through supported devices. Bell isn’t a great option here, but I haven’t given up on Rogers yet.   


With Ignite TV, the standard setup is meant to be simple.  (Okay, maybe it's not always simple... but more on that later.)  You connect the Ignite gateway, power it up, use an app to perform the initial configuration, then add Pods to expand your WiFi overage.  To install your Ignite TV set-top boxes, you power them up, they auto-connect to WiFi, follow on-screen prompts to select the UI language, and pair the remote control.  That's it.  (One of the services that runs on the Ignite gateway, with its own hidden WiFi SSID, is the "secret sauce" that allows the set-top box to automagically discover the WiFi network that you just configured only a few moments ago and connect without any action required on your part.)

 

You won't get that level of integration with Start or TekSavvy, but they are also prepared to support you (as best as they can) with whatever network gear that you have installed in your home.  Their TV service runs on common, off-the-shelf streaming boxes.  If you want to run your home network with the network products and configuration of your own choosing, then theirs is the only option that will allow you to do that.

 

With Rogers, if you install third-party equipment, it breaks their integration and complicates what should be a simple installation.  When you need to support the number of customers that Rogers does, you can only do that with hardware that you have standardized on, that you have tested, and that you can train your technicians and support teams to install and support.

 

Bell isn’t a great option here, but I haven’t given up on Rogers yet.  A couple of questions:

 

1. If the Ignite modem in bridged mode still has to use WIFI to connect to the Ignite set-top boxes, won’t this cause a conflict with the EERO’s also on WIFI resulting in poor WIFI reception.  Is there a way to work around and avoid.    


I have run Ignite TV in an unsupported configuration for more than two years.  I am also prepared to revert back to a supported configuration on a moment's notice, if required.  I will also never be calling Rogers for help getting my in-home network configured or for any help troubleshooting Wi-Fi.

 

Ignite TV streams over your in-home Wi-Fi network, whatever that may be.  The set-top box will also still connect to one of the "hidden" services on the Ignite gateway from time to time, but not much data is transferred over those connections.

 

The thing that you most need to worry about, when running Ignite TV over your own gear, is what happens when something randomly breaks.  For example, you may find one day that your set-top boxes suddenly start dropping off of WiFi.  (I'm not saying that they will, but they may.)  You will need to figure out why.  The Rogers support techs won't have a clue as to what might have caused this problem, nor will they be able to support you.  It may be due to a quirk in your config and the Community may not be able to help you.  Nothing about Ignite TV is documented anywhere (at least not publicly) and you probably won't be able to Google your way to a solution.  If you can't troubleshoot these sort of things, then...

 

2. How much range does the Ignite modem have to connect the TVs.  I’m worried we might have reception issues if the Ignite modem is on a different floor than the TVs. The reason I added the Eero Pro 6’s was because of dead spots in my house.  Should I be concerned. Any stuttering reboots would be a drag.     


It's not just a matter of range; it's more where you have your modem installed, what in (or about) your home could block the modem's signal, and the quality of the connections of ALL the devices that connect to it.

 

In my family members' homes, I have Ignite TV installs that work flawlessly using nothing but the Ignite gateway or with an Ignite gateway + Pods.  It works great.  When something goes wrong, Rogers is there to support them.

 

In my own home, I have experimented with just about every WiFi connection method possible other than Pods.  I am currently using my own router with the Ignite gateway in bridge mode, business grade Wi-Fi access points, and I can get an 866 Mb/s Wi-Fi connection on the 5GHz band in every corner of my home.

 

To get optimal Wi-Fi performance, I had to do a site survey and find optimal locations for all Wi-Fi access points, and carefully map out the Wi-Fi coverage that I get throughout the home.  In those standard Rogers installations, if I move the Ignite gateway 30 cm (12 inches) to the left or right, WiFi will break horribly.  The equipment works great when it is installed correctly.

 

3. I’m not too worried about Rogers installing next Gen fibre network anytime soon here,  It’s possible but there might be more TV streaming options later too.   


Rogers can provide you with a perfectly good turnkey solution for TV and Internet, that they can support end-to-end.

 

You can also get much better performance and have full control over your in-home network when you run Ignite TV over your own gear.  The only catch is that you need to be TOTALLY self-sufficient when it comes to support AND be prepared to revert back to a supportable configuration for those times when you do need support from Rogers.

 

If you are not happy with either of those choices, then you need to explore other options.