If one converts to Ignite, will one's landline phone with Rogers still be a landline?

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BarrierReef
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Posts: 1

If one converts to Ignite, will one's landline phone with Rogers still be a landline?

I hope the title of this post is clear.

We've had a landline phone for ages -- originally with Bell, and then we added home phone to our Rogers package.

But we've learned that Rogers will be forcing the conversion of everything and everyone to Ignite.

When that happens, if we keep Rogers home phone, will the home phone no longer be connected by landline (i.e., through the house's legacy phone wall jacks) but now be wireless?

Thanks for any info.

 

 

 

***Edited Labels***

-G-
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Re: If one converts to Ignite, will one's landline phone with Rogers still be a landline?

@BarrierReef  Ignite Home Phone is still a landline service.  You continue to use the same telephones and the Ignite Home Phone service can also be connected to your in-home telephone wiring.

 

The primary difference is that the Ignite Home Phone service is delivered through the Ignite Internet modem rather then using a separate modem.

 

For more information about Ignite Home Phone, please go to: 

https://www.rogers.com/customer/support/article/how-to-setup-ignite-home-phone

https://www.rogers.com/customer/support/article/ignite-home-phone-faqs



Datalink
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Re: If one converts to Ignite, will one's landline phone with Rogers still be a landline?

@BarrierReef when you switch over to the Ignite system, if you choose to keep your landline, it will become an internet connected landline.  That is to say, that the Home Phone modem that you currently have will be replaced in part by the modem.  The XB6 and XB7 modems provide telephone capability in addition to ethernet and wifi capabilities.  Essentially, an all in one box. 

 

The bigger problem is the placement of the XB6 or XB7 modem.  Traditionally the Home phone modem resides in or near the structured wiring cabinet in the basement, where all of the house telephone cables start or terminate, depending on your point of view.  In addition, if you have a home alarm system, that system is connected to the telephone system so that its the first device that is connected to the home phone modem.  From there, the alarm system connects to the rest of the house telephone system.  Its done that way so that the alarm system can capture the line at any moment to place a call to the alarm company, regardless of any call that is in progress.  So, the presence of an alarm system can complicate the Ignite TV system installation.  

 

In order to see the best wifi performance from the XB6 or XB7 modem, the best place for it to reside is probably on the main floor of your home.  That depends of course on how much use you see from your basement and upper floors and how much of that use depends on good wifi.  In any event parking the modem on the main floor presents challenges connecting it to the telephone system and to any existing alarm system.  In theory you can simply disconnect the current Home Phone modem from the house telephone system, which leaves the house telephone cabling in an open, available state, and then connect the modems telephone port to any existing telephone port in the house.  In theory that should work ok.  Ideally the source for any telephone system would connect to the telephone 66 block which is in the structured wiring cabinet in the basement, as your current Home Phone modem is probably connected today.  

 

The complication is whether or not you have an alarm system, which should be visible in or near the structured wiring cabinet in the basement.  The decision at this point is whether or not to adopt one of following possible paths:

 

1.  Park the modem in the basement so that the telephone port connects to the existing telephone system and alarm system.  This will require the placement of pods upstairs to see reasonable wifi performance which the set top boxes rely on. 

 

2.  Park the modem upstairs and connect the modem to any existing wallplate telephone port.  This would require a telephone cable splitter mounted on the modem to connect an upstairs phone at the modem's location and all connect the modem to the house telephone system.  If you don't need a telephone at the upstairs location, then you would simply connect the modem to the wallplate telephone port.  This would also require a slight wiring change to the house telephone wiring if you happen to have an alarm system running.  The telephone cable running downstairs would have to be connected to the alarm system instead of the rest of the house telephone wiring.  The alarm system then connects to the rest of the house telephone wiring as it is now.  This remains unchanged from its current connection to the house wiring system.  Rogers will not do this.  You would have to call in an alarm system tech or a telephone/internet installer company to make this change.  Its actually pretty simple to do.    

 

So, yes, the home phone is still a home phone, provided thru the modem, but, the location of the modem is complicated by the fact that the house telephone cable system starts or ends in the basement, not upstairs near any possible modem location.  I think houses have been built this way for, well, forever.  Comcast seems to have decided to throw out the existing construction and building practices and gone its own way.  And don't forget, throw in the added complication of an alarm system.  This is food for thought for anyone considering switching over to the Ignite system.  Once its done, you probably wouldn't look at it for several years, if ever, depending on what future modems might bring in terms of internet, tv and phone capabilities.  



Pauly
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Re: If one converts to Ignite, will one's landline phone with Rogers still be a landline?

Technically your home phone is already on a digital platform when its on Rogers home Phone, its just moving to a DIFFERENT digital platform when you switch to the Ignite package which is better, so its easier for Rogers to give ONE Box with ALL your services instead of having separate Box for internet, separate Box for home phone, separate box for TV, etc. hope this makes sense?

Technically I don't know if Internet connected landline is the correct word to use to describe it, as I'm sure the phone traffic is not travelling thru the public internet, its probably thru a private segment, so i feel much better knowing this. but yes its always been thru a private network segment and never the public internet.


Pauly
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Re: If one converts to Ignite, will one's landline phone with Rogers still be a landline?

Just to add to Datalink's comment, if you have one of the First Generations of home alarm systems, those alarm systems were usually monitored thru a phone line and the Phone connection needs to be wired up a certain way so the alarm will seize the line when it communicates with the central monitoring station.

However times have changed and Most people who have had an alarm system installed in the Last Decade likely have a newer system that does NOT rely on landlines OR has optional modules to add to your system to monitor it over different networks instead of a traditional land line.

Using a traditional landline for your alarm monitoring in 2021 is kind of outdated now and its a good idea to look into ways to monitor it via other methods like thru your LAN connection, thru your Wi-Fi connection, thru a separate 4G/5G Cellular connection, or heck, even smoke signals lmao just kidding but you get the point but if you really still insist on using a landline (Such as Rogers Home Phone or Rogers IGNITE Home Phone) to monitor your alarm system in 2021, it *will* still work, however you MAY require a more complex wiring job to get it to work and it may limit where you want to place your modem gateway.



-G-
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Re: If one converts to Ignite, will one's landline phone with Rogers still be a landline?

@BarrierReef  I didn't want to overcomplicate the response to a simple question.  If you provide us with more information about what services you currently have, how things are set up, and any concerns that you have with a potential switch to Ignite for any of your services, we will be more than happy to provide you with guidance and information that is specific to your situation.