Forced to take VoIP home phone after moving addresses

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Forced to take VoIP home phone after moving addresses

I have a dedicated phone line ( not VOIP) which according to Rogers customer service cannot be moved to new house and has to be replaced with VOIP line and on their self serve new modem.

 

My job requires a terminal adaptor dedicated phone line, I have already moved and am out of internet for 5 days waiting for callback from Office of the President and there has not been response till now.

 

 

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Re: Forced to take VoIP home phone after moving addresses


@NEEL2 wrote:

I have a dedicated phone line ( not VOIP) which according to Rogers customer service cannot be moved to new house and has to be replaced with VOIP line and on their self serve new modem.

 

My job requires a terminal adaptor dedicated phone line, I have already moved and am out of internet for 5 days waiting for callback from Office of the President and there has not been response till now.


I am curious as to what critical functions or features the Ignite Home Phone service does not support.  Do you have any special equipment that is not compatible with Ignite Home Phone?  Do you need a phone service that is totally separate from your Internet service?

 

Hopefully Rogers can help you out because your only alternative would be to get your phone service (and perhaps more) from another provider.  Keep in mind that even Bell's Home Phone service is slowly migrating to VoIP with "dial tone" provided by telephone ports on their all-in-one Home Hub modems.



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Re: Forced to take VoIP home phone after moving addresses

@NEEL2 is your new house a newly constructed house in a new neighbourhood or subdivision, or is this an existing house in a neighbourhood or subdivision that's been around for several years? 

 

If its a newly constructed house, in a new neighbourhood or subdivision, you could have a problem as some developers will make a deal with the telecom provider who offers them the best deal, and leave any other telecom providers locked out.  So, you may need to do some homework to determine if you can obtain telecom services from any other company.  You might find that Rogers is the only game in town, so to speak when it comes to a telecom provider for your new house. 

 

If Rogers is the only telecom provider for your house, you're butting up against their current policies which is to shift (force) users onto the Ignite TV (IPTV) services for those users who want any form of cable tv.  Rogers is gradually shifting customers from the previous generation of cable TV services onto the IPTV system.  That said, if you don't take up the IPTV service, you should be able to run the traditional cable modems for internet service. 

 

If this is a new house in a new subdivision, you might also have fibre only, with no copper cabling available.  That could be the same for Rogers or Bell services available for your home and if so, that could or will also restrict the type of services and modems that are available to you.  If this is the case, for Rogers, you would have a fibre Optical Network Unit in your home or garage and a short copper cable run to the modem.  That ONU should be easy to spot, if this is indeed the situation that you're in.   If you also have Bell fibre run to the house, you should be able to see a Bell fibre enclosure outside of the home.



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Re: Forced to take VoIP home phone after moving addresses

Over the last several years, consumers have become accustomed to retaining control of their phone numbers--specifically, being able to transfer them when switching cellular or local landline services. But the situation is less clear for relatively new Voice-over-IP services.