Connecting home phone to Ignite Router

Need Help?

That's what we're here for! The goal of the Rogers Community is to help you find answers on everything Rogers. Can't find what you're looking for? Just ask!
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply
Bplayer
I'm a Trusted Contributor
Posts: 204

Re: Connecting home phone to Ignite Router

@alioop70 Unfortunately your frustrations are from your lack of understanding of their products and hardware. The legacy service and modem is now obsolete and is being phased out over time. This could be years but it will happen. If your modem were to fail they might be able to replace it with a used one, but they would likely use that as an opportunity to switch to over to Ignite.

In summary, at some point you will have to go the Ignite route or switch providers. There is no mixing and matching possible.

 

alioop70
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

Re: Connecting home phone to Ignite Router

Thank you for your response regarding the quality of the Ignite Home phone product. You are correct in regards to the complexity arising due to the Legacy Rogers home phone modem located beside the Hydro Panel and adjacent to the Home Alarm which is nearest the Demarcation point. For years I had my original CODA Hitron modem in this location as well. However about a year ago I was experiencing degradation of my internet and was told that I should relocate the modem to a central space within the living area. So now the problem arises, as the new Ignite XB7 modem is a 2 in 1 gateway solution with both the Internet and the home phone ports in one. Per the Rogers guides, the placement of the modem should be in a central area of the home. If I place it where I have the internet modem now, I do not have a free telephone jack in that area. Furthermore , from what I understand I need to have the home alarm as the first device off the telephone modem which will then feed all of the existing telephone Jack's in the house. Problem is where do I place the modem? Near the hydro panel is good for the home phone and alarm but poor for internet or if the modem is.places upstairs i have no telephone jack in that room so it won't backfeed the existing phone wiring....can you tell me how others with Home alarm systems requiring telephone lines are able to achieve the upgrade to Ignite internet and Ignite home phone without somehow fishing new wire or running exposed telephone lines to make connections back to the demarcation point near the Hydro panel? Do rogers techs have some sorcery they can perform in these situations? I wish they would have asked if I had an alarm system which required a telephone line.,.....I wouldn't have gone through with placing the order if I new it wouldn't work or would require significant workarounds..
alioop70
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

Re: Connecting home phone to Ignite Router

Bplayer it seems you have exceptional knowledge so I assume you are also well are of what takes place when the support team is now more like the sales team. The moment you are having trouble and a reboot and zapping of your.modem doesn't work they tell you that you should upgrade to the new better service for only $30 more a mth or whatever the case may be. And you are 100% correct that my frustrations come from my lack of knowledge of the product, I am the customer and I assumed the Tech support individual who now is more of a.salea person now, who just wants to take the opportunity to get me off of the legacy system would have answered my direct question "does there need to be a telephone jack near the modem placement? correctly to which she answered, No, its on wi-fi. Then I guess my frustration is all on me. In any case , I have been with Rogers for over 20 years and I am aware of the dances that we have to do with them when they want you off of a.Legacy plan or system, only this time they have you even worse due to all of the members of the household either working from home or at home schooling so they know you don't have much choice.....thanks again for explaining the cause of my frustration though. Take care and be well, I realize this really is a first world problem so ill take my lumps:-(
-G-
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 2,146

Re: Connecting home phone to Ignite Router

@alioop70  I have a family member who would like to get Ignite Home Phone but is in a similar situation.  I will be installing two Cat 5e Ethernet runs from the Ignite gateway location (on the main floor) to the electrical panel in the basement, with 8P8C jacks at each end.  I will use one of those for telephone, patching one end into the Ignite gateway's telephone jack; the other end will get patched into the tip and ring inputs of the RJ-31x jack, that the alarm system connects to and that also serves as the connection point for the home's telephone jacks.

 

In plain English, basically I will be running a telephone extension cord from the modem location on the main floor back to the electrical panel, so that I can place the modem in the main living space but still connect the telephone service at the demarc by the electrical panel.

 

You could also run telephone cabling with RJ11 jacks at each end.  Connect to Ignite gateway's telephone jack at one end.  At the other end, disconnect the telephone line from the Rogers Phone modem and plug it into the other end of your extension cable.



Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,334

Re: Connecting home phone to Ignite Router

@alioop70 where are you in the switch over process, still using the Hitron CODA-4582, or switched over to the XB7?

 

In the cases where a customer has an older alarm system which is connected to the house phone system, and which has to be the first device connected to the phone system, there are two alternatives for connecting the modem to the alarm system, assuming that there is a nearby telephone port:

 

1.  Rewire the telephone cable that runs downstairs from that telephone port, that is to say, remove the two "in use" wires from the 66 block which is in the basement structured wiring cabinet, and connect those to wires to the input wires of the alarm system.  The output of the alarm system would remain connected to the 66 block feed side. 

 

In your particular case, you should have a telephone surface mount connector near the 66 block, which was connected to the previous Home Phone modem, assuming that the Home Phone modem has been removed.  The Home Phone modem would have connected to that surface mount connector like this:

 

https://www.summitsource.com/Leviton-Surface-Mount-Phone-Block-Jack-Ivory-RJ11-Wall-Jack-Block-Modul...

 

The alarm system wiring input (2 wires) would then be connected to that surface mount connector.  The alarm system output (2 wires) would be connected to the left side of the 66 block.  The house telephone cables would be connected to the right side of the 66 block.  

 

Assuming that this is what you have in place, the easy solution, if a telephone port was available close to the modem, is to identify the particular cable on the right side of the 66 block, remove it from the 66 block and either install an RJ-11 jack, which would connect to the existing surface mount, or hardwire the 2 wires onto the correct contacts in the surface mount.  

 

Identifying the correct wire pair on the 66 block is the hardest part of this.  

 

2.  Assuming that you have something like a Cat-5 ethernet cable in use for the telephone cable, only one wire pair of the 4 wire pairs is typically used for the telephone system.  It would be possible to use one of the other pairs as a feed cable for the alarm system.  That would require a wiring change at both ends.  Upstairs, one pair would have to be identified, and used for installation of a telephone keystone.  You would end up with two telephone ports on the wallplate, running on the same Cat-5e cable.  One port for the phone in that location and one port to connect to teh modem's telephone port.  

 

Downstairs, from that same cable, identify the same two wires and install an RJ-11 jack to connect to the surface mount connector, or, hard wire the two wires to the surface mount connector.  Now, fwiw, this might be difficult if the original installation tech has done a neat job, leaving very little slack in the telephone cables where they connect to the 66 block.  

 

So, this configuration would be unusual to say the least.  I don't know if this would work as expected as you might run into cross-talk issues between the two wire pairs in that cable.

 

Do you have ethernet cabling in your home which could be used to connect to a wifi access point?  Rogers uses pods which run over wifi, to extend the wifi coverage from the modem.  Users have mixed success with those, but, it should be possible to run an access point at any location in the home where you have an ethernet port.  That might make it possible to park the modem in the basement and still end up with reasonable wifi service, without relying on the pods, although the pods are supposed to provide good coverage (in theory).

 

Your frustration with the whole process of switching over is understandable.  Personal opinion, Rogers has done a very poor job of detailing the nitty gritty details of switching from the Hitron modems to the XB6 and XB7.  You're not the first customer to be caught out by this, and .... you probably won't be the last.  While the theory is switching modems is simple, the reality is that homes are not built to accommodate Comcast's vision of how a home should support an XB6 or XB7, instead of the other way around.  

 

Food for thought, contact your alarm system company and see if they have other alarm systems available which connect via cell phone for example.  That would require switching the main alarm box, but, maybe they have a solution to the problem.  You wouldn't be the first customer of theirs with this particular problem.  

 

Does your home have any ethernet runs from the structured wiring cabinet in the basement to the upstairs rooms?

 

And, are there any telephone ports that are not in use that also happen to be located near a cable port, even if that means that the modem won't be in an ideal central location?

 

Is your basement finished, or unfinished?  If its not finished, would it be possible to fish a couple of Cat-5e cables upstairs, from the basement structured wiring panel?  I would actually run three cables.  One for the modem feed to the basement alarm system,  one to run back upstairs for the phone at that location and one for ethernet purposes to possible feed a gigabit switch in the basement which could then feed other ethernet runs for the home. 



amoreira
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 12

Re: Connecting home phone to Ignite Router

I apologize, little late to this.  I just changed over from legacy cable to ignite (way too expensive compared to Ignite).  Wish I had read about this first, I may have pushed harder to keep legacy and negotiate pricing.  I also have a home alarm connected to phone and as soon as I disconnected the phone modem, the alarm stopped communicating with the monitoring station.  I just changed ove4 this weekend so I hadn’t yet sent back my older Rogers hardware.  We tried every which way to fix the issue with the home alarm (placed modem in basement near panel and connected directly to wall jack where phone modem used to plug in, worked fine, but the internet signal was very weak, tried setting up two routers, no luck).  If keeping the phone modem solves my issue, why do I need to send it back? I continue to be a Rogers customer.  Why does Rogers make things so complicated and not warn you about certain issues beforehand?  So frustrated.

-G-
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 2,146

Re: Connecting home phone to Ignite Router

@amoreira How comfortable are you with installing a phone jack?  You can do it for $30 worth of parts that you can find at any Home Depot.  No special tools are required either; just a screwdriver, wire cutters, and a pocket knife to strip wires.  If your modem is located on the first floor of your home, it's pretty straightforward.

 

You'll need a surface mount phone jack  that you will install next to your electrical panel, telephone cable that you would run from your electrical panel (following the path of the coax cable) to the wall outlet where your modem is plugged in, and a coax/telephone wall plate that will replace your existing coax wall plate.  You will basically be building a telephone extension cord.

 

The trickiest part is fishing the phone wire up through the wall, following the same path as your coax cable.

 

As for the connections, the telephone jacks at each end will have screw terminals for Green, Red (line 1) and Yellow, Black (line 2, optional).  Connect each colour to the same colour at the other end.  (If the bulk wire has Blue/Orange/Green pairs, here is how the colours match up.)

 

When you are done, connect your Ignite modem's telephone jack at one end, and connector for your old modem (that feeds your alarm system) at the other end.



Pauly
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 2,882

Re: Connecting home phone to Ignite Router

Great info. Also wanted to mention, I'm a former telecom technician, depending on how the builder wired up the telephone wires in your house, you *MAY* be able to have Ignite Home Phone and your modem does not have to be in your basement, and still have your alarm system monitored via the phone lines.

I posted about this earlier, the way I did it was without running new wires, but instead use an unused pair of wires that is already inside the wall. You will still have to do some re-wiring of the RJ31X jack in your basement cus thats likely where the Alarms guy put it, but it can be done, if your uncomfortable with this and feel its not as much of DIY Job you were hoping for, then feel free to hire a trained telecom expert to do this for you.


-G-
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 2,146

Re: Connecting home phone to Ignite Router

With the instructions in my previous post, rather than connecting to the Green/Red screw terminals on the surface-mount phone jack, you could also wire directly to the Tip/Ring inputs of the RJ31X, replacing the wiring that previously connected to your old phone modem.  However, the advantage of building that "extension cord", with phone jacks at each end, is that there is nothing to take apart and nothing to mess up.  The parts are readily available, no special tools are required, and you can continue to use your existing wiring.

 

However, as @Pauly said, if any of this is beyond your comfort level, do yourself a HUGE favour and hire a qualified technician to wire the Ignite modem to your alarm system and in-home telephone wiring.



Pauly
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 2,882

Re: Connecting home phone to Ignite Router

You can also contact your alarm company or provider and see what other methods they offer to monitor your alarm system.

When I had an alarm system installed 20 years ago in my old house, The ONLY way to monitor it was from the phone line.

In the last 10-15 years, technology has changed and improved. A friend of mine has an alarm system in his condo which does not need a phone line, its monitored thru the cellphone network, theres a sim card inside the main panel and it connects to 4G cellphone to communicate. This is good for people who dont have and dont want a landline.

There is also devices like the hub6 which you add onto your existing alarm (provided its compatible) and it enhances your alarm system so it can be monitored wirelssly.

There is also methods of connecting your alarm system to your broadband internet, which we all have now in our homes, this is also great for people who dont have a phone line.

Its really your choice, I'm not telling people to change, but I am telling them monitoring thru the phone line is not the only option any more, it may have been the only way 20 years ago tho so people may not be aware.