Windows 10 Upgrade

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Rogers Employee
Rogers Employee
Posts: 992

Re: Windows 10 Upgrade

@Datalink ... @Vivien hit the nail on my head 😛 I hurt.

but yea the system tray is what the bottom right is called, pretty much the same area with your time / netowork logo (wifi or wired icon)
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I'm an Advisor
Posts: 931

Re: Windows 10 Upgrade


@Datalink wrote:

Not going to push PC versus MAC, but VivienM hit the nail on the head when she indicated  "get a laptop with a proper dual-band 802.11ac wireless card. Over in the Internet forum, we get way too many people who are getting slow speeds and it turns out that their otherwise-very-nice laptop is hobbled by a lousy single-band 802.11n card."


 

FWIW, I'm not a she... just someone with a confusing real name who should really have adopted a pseudonym when joining forums...

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Posts: 931

Re: Windows 10 Upgrade


@ShakTib wrote:

@RogersMoin
I agree.
@VivienM - thank you.

As a community we are allowed to enjoy great insight of people like VivienM, really made great points. Yes. I may not prefer MAC for all the right reason in my mind, but after reading VivienM point... (which I am speechless and not sure what to respond with)...
I gotta say... I should do a lot more research on. I am indeed not versed with apple product.

And hey @VivienM - I was joking, and definitely take back my words... Definitely not fandom... you went by experience and facts. and for that, I applaud good ,... well deserved. Smiley Surprised
Thank you for the informative details 🙂
I like how and what your preferences is, and I am very happy that you enjoy apple products more. They work for you, and end of the day, thats what matters, when tech finally works for us and stays working. Reliability is definitely a must.


Sorry if I was a bit too intense - fact is, I do take Windows 8/8.1 very personally... and it's only after years of waiting (hence why I'm still running an LGA775/DDR2 desktop) to see if MS would right the ship that I finally bit the bullet and bought the Mac laptop.

 

To get back to the laptop shopping point, the unfortunate reality is that the Windows consumer laptop industry is in a bit of a tight spot. Unlike Apple, they can't seem to sell expensive laptops in big volumes... so they end up mostly focusing on cheap ($400-700ish) machines with flashy-seeming specs (look how many GBs it has!) and all kinds of cut corners around those specs. Cheap wifi cards, cheap low-resolution screens, slow hard drives (who cares about performance if it has lots of GBs), bilingual keyboards, low-quality touchpads, software images full of bloatware, even sometimes some CPUs that deliver lower performance than low-end CPUs of 10 years ago, etc. And it's a vicious cycle - someone who buys one of those things, is disappointed with it, and can feel that it's... inferior... to her friend's MacBook (even if she can't articulate WHY it is) will not go and buy an expensive Windows laptop, they'll just buy a Mac next time around.

 

There are good Windows laptops out there; I certainly think my work Lenovo T550 (running Win7) is excellent. (My Dell L502x is quite nice, except for the awful reliability issues... but it is thick in part because it has a bluray burner, something I thought was a great idea in 2011... but turned out to be VivienM betting on the wrong horse. Oops) But few people are willing to pay that kind of money for a non-Apple laptop for home use...

 

And to get back to other people's Acer criticism - given Acer has sold $600-700ish machines through the Microsoft store with 1920x1080 IPS screens, dual-band wifi, a mSATA slot if you want to add an SSD, etc, I have difficulty being too hard on Acer...

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Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,872

Re: Windows 10 Upgrade

@VivienM my apologies. 

 

I do agree with your thinking, 1920x1080 IPS screens, dual-band wifi, a mSATA slot.  When I replaced the hard drive in my daughters Acer with a Samsung 840 Pro, I was much happier with it.  I'd like to see what a laptop would do with an mSATA slot in comparison.



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Rogers Employee
Rogers Employee
Posts: 992

Re: Windows 10 Upgrade

Most laptops I see in Microsoft stores are above $1000
maybe I am not noticing the mid-tier ones by default?

You are making me consider MAC slightly.
But I don't want to join another ecosystem...

especially now with most companies doing their closed ecosystem (google seems to be still some-what universal, and even they don't have dedicated apps on Windows devices or anything)
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Posts: 931

Re: Windows 10 Upgrade


@ShakTib wrote:
Most laptops I see in Microsoft stores are above $1000
maybe I am not noticing the mid-tier ones by default?

You are making me consider MAC slightly.
But I don't want to join another ecosystem...

especially now with most companies doing their closed ecosystem (google seems to be still some-what universal, and even they don't have dedicated apps on Windows devices or anything)

The Microsoft store also has unusual policies (e.g. no bilingual keyboard SKUs, everything must have a touch screen unless they got rid of that), and I think they try to spotlight expensive Windows hardware precisely to compete against the Apple store at the other end of the mall. If you want to see $400-700 mainstream Windows machines, check out Best Buy or maybe Staples or other such retailers.

 

What I like about the Mac is a few things:

1) Apple doesn't cheap out on the little things. Every Mac has Broadcom's dual-band wifi. Every current Mac with an SSD uses the PCI-E SSDs. Etc. You can be confident that the only real difference between models is processor speed/RAM/storage (for which they charge dearly, don't get me wrong!), not some trivial little thing that turns out to be a very big deal later (e.g. wifi cards). I've never been a big fan of touchpads (give me the Lenovo-style pointing stick any day), but the touchpad on the MacBook Pro is miles better than the one on my Dell L502x, which is much better than what you'd get in a $500-600 Windows laptop.

 

2) OS X, and its extreme conservatism. They push out an upgrade every year or two and it has... some useful new little features, some appearance tweaks, etc, but that's it. The core UI of Mac OS X hasn't changed in a decade; in many ways, and despite not sharing a single byte of code with the 'classic' Mac OS, most of the UI paradigms of the 1984-era 'classic' Mac OS are still there - the menu bar at the top, the apple menu, the same keyboard shortcuts, the Finder still works very similarly (e.g. if you want to open something from the keyboard, you can't hit Enter, you have to do Command-O), etc.

 

(I was actually a Mac user prior to 1995... and having had very little exposure to the Mac platform since until my mom got one in late 2013 and I got this one a few weeks ago, it's very interesting to see how little changed in the user-facing elements)

 

Compare that to the world of Windows, where MS loves to change things just as everyone has finally figured out the old way of doing things - e.g. the changes in the wifi network selection interface, the constant attempts to change the control panel (culminating in Win8/8.1/10's Metro Settings app that partly but not completely replaces the traditional control panel), etc.

 

Also, OS X is internally consistent in a way that most Windows versions other than 2000/XP/7 have not been. Vista (remember the controversy over the Win3.1-looking font add dialog?), 8, 8.1, and 10 have some interface elements where you feel like the team was trying to change something... but was forced to ship the product before that change was implemented everywhere. When you're working with an early public beta, you think 'okay, they'll fix it before RTM'... and then you realize that no, the product is going to ship that way.

 

As for Google and others not having native apps on Windows platforms - the reality is that on the mobile side (incl. tablets), the dominant ecosystems are

1) iOS (because it has more people willing to throw money at apps, plus the small number of iOS device models makes development/testing easier)

2) Android (because it has a monstrous installed base)

3) in Canada, BlackBerry

... and Microsoft is, unusually for them, the #4 player. Kinda like Atari or Amiga or maybe Be in the PC days of the late 1980s or early 1990s. People bought Windows machines starting in the mid-1990s because 'everybody uses Windows' and 'all software is available for Windows', so then everybody developed for Windows, further feeding the cycle. Now it's happening with iOS/Android and Microsoft is locked out by the very mechanism that built their PC fortress...

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I'm an Advisor
Posts: 1,524

Re: Windows 10 Upgrade

VivienM:

 

Your comments about laptops, Windows, and Macs are bang on. While I've never owned a Mac, I've always liked them, despite the price. I'm the type of person who will pay a premium for something if I need and can afford it. The only Apple device I've ever owned is my almost 4 year old iPhone 4S and I just love it. I'm impressed that Apple is able to keep the 4S up-to-date with the latest iOS. I'm currently on 8.4 and signed up for the Apple streaming service trial. I also understand the 4S will support iOS 9. Of course, there are lots of features in iOS which will only work on the latest model phones. Prior to the 4S, I had a BlackBerry Bold for 3 years, which met my needs quite well. I also like iOS, even though Apple can make it tough for developers to pass muster, which I think is a good thing.

 

Your comment about Atari and Amiga sure brings back memories. My first "game" machine was an Atari Pong back in 1972. That was followed by an Atari 2600 and 5200. In 1985, I got a Commodore Amiga, which had the "ground breaking" technology of 3.5 inch floppies. The Amiga also had a feature called Janus, which allowed me to run IBM software on it, which is what I was using at work in those days.

 

To all the contributors in this thread, I'm loving the debates and appreciate all the different points of view. I'm a technology "geek", which started for me back in 1963 when I was trained to program and operate a GE mainframe computer for one of the big banks. I had a long and successful career in IT and still like to keep up with what's going on. Smiley Happy

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Rogers Employee
Rogers Employee
Posts: 992

Re: Windows 10 Upgrade

@VivienM

You rock.

The knowledge you have on this just makes me want you to talk mor so I can learn.

You however have successfully hijacked Windows 10 Upgrade topic with Pro-MAC statements LOL

 

If i can hit the like buttons more than once, I would be doing so on your responses 😄

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I'm an Advisor
Posts: 1,524

Re: Windows 10 Upgrade

My opinion is that, because this is the Community Lounge, there should be no such thing as off-topic. Anything goes. Smiley Wink

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Rogers Employee
Rogers Employee
Posts: 992

Re: Windows 10 Upgrade

THATS RIGHT!!

 

Anything GOES.jpg

 

LOL