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Active Splitter EVO1-5U/U Replacement

Edgardo1956
I plan to stick around

Hi Everyone,

When we moved to our new house 11 year ago, an active splitter was all wired in as part of the house. this device takes the incoming coax signal from Rogers and distributes the signal to all coax outlets thought the house.

The device is an EVO 1-5 U/U and after all this time started buzzing like crazy and we lost Internet, TV and Phone services and the Ignite modem was flashing amber.

When I noticed the buzzing and went to power the splitter down, I noticed that it has a Passive output and I was able to swap and connect the coax to the Ignite modem from and active output to the passive output and all is working fine now.

Because the device was already wired in when we moved to the new house, I do not know who installed it, the builder or Rogers.

The device now needs to be replaced but I am not sure if I need to get Rogers to do it or I can simply get a new one from BestBuy or Amazon and replace it myself. It should be a 15 minutes job.

The reason I want to keep it instead of connecting the Ignite modem to the incoming coax directly is because this device has surge protection and I want to keep that, in addition, if we sell the house not sure if the person that buys it will use Ignite or a different way to distribute signals thru the house so it will be a good idea to make sure signals gets to all outlets.

I will really appreciate any advice on how to proceed. Thank you.

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions

Re: Active Splitter EVO1-5U/U Replacement

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

@Edgardo1956 you indicated that you connected the modem cable to the amplifier's passive port.  That port essentially is one of the output ports of the internal splitter.  So, the signal loss thru that port is 3.5 dB, or, half power. 

 

The Ignite modems, XB6, XB7 or XB8, normally do not require an amplifier or splitter installed at the point where the inbound Rogers cable connects to the house cable.  When the modem was installed, either by a tech or by yourself, that amplifier should have been disconnected from all cables, including the power cable and the other house cables pulled back out of the way.  The inbound Rogers cable should have been connected to the modem cable with an F-81 connector which looks like this:

 

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/ideal-3ghz-f-splice-adapter-10-pack-/1000751479

 

If this was a self install, then the installation kit should have included one of these.  

 

If your modem was installed by a tech, then the tech should have ensured that the inbound cable signal levels were adequate and he, or she, should have removed the amplifier at that time.  

 

With your current situation, you're not gaining anything by connecting thru the amp's internal splitter.  In fact your losing 3.5 dB due to the signal drop thru the splitter.  It if turns out that the modem signal levels are too high, then a Forward Path Attenuator with the correct frequency range should be installed.  Here's one example:

 

https://www.multicominc.com/product/multicom-mul-fpa85-forward-path-attenuator/

 

Rogers tends to use large splitters to drop the signal levels which accommodate the required frequency range. 

 

In terms of surge protection, if you have a nylon Rogers box, known as a Network Interface Device mounted near the home's external electrical meter, that box will contain a cable ground block which is a standard installation for houses.  That cable ground block should have a copper ground cable connected to it.  That ground cable should be evident as it leaves the box and connects to a ground clamp that is attached to the electrical meter box. That cable ground block should provide adequate surge protection although I sometimes wonder if the clamp on the meter box is adequate for the job. 

 

The cable ground block will look something like this:

 

https://www.maddison.ca/mad-001287.html?___store=english&___from_store=default

 

If the copper ground cable is connected to the external electrical meter box, then the cable system aluminum braid is grounded to the house electrical system.  If the amplifier is also grounded to the house plumbing system for example, then that ground should be removed as you can have a ground loop running where each ground point is at a different electrical potential. 

 

 

Your amplifier has an upstream frequency range of 5 to 42 Mhz, a downstream range of 54 to 1002 Mhz and a frequency range of 5 to 1002 Mhz on the Voip port where your modem is currently connected.  Those ranges are no longer guaranteed for Rogers frequency ranges.  Rogers is changing the upstream frequency from 5 to 42 Mhz up to 5 to 85 Mhz (mid-split), and at some point, perhaps already, changing the downstream frequency from 208 to 1002 Mhz up to 208 to 1218 Mhz.  The next expansion at some point way, way down the road might see the upstream frequencies run from 5 to 208 Mhz (high-split), and the downstream run from 208 to 1794 Mhz.  Beyond that Docsis 4 is looking at running frequencies up to 3 Ghz.  That's a very long way down the road.  Will Rogers ever get there?? Don't know.  Personal opinion, fibre would be the way to go instead of changing everything to run 3 Ghz over cable.    

 

So, bottom line, your amplifier might be causing problems that you're not aware of, simply due to the change in cable operating frequencies.  You won't know unless you install a high frequency F-81 connector as shown above and then look at the signal levels to determine the upstream and downstream frequencies that are in use.  I'd remove the amplifier permanently and not give it a second thought.

 

In terms of the future owners, let them decide what they want to do.  Way down the road what you might find is fibre to the home, with fibre in home or possibly ethernet.  

 

If you're really worried about surge protection, have a look at the external NID and confirm that a copper ground cable connects to the electrical meter box. 

 

You can get gas surge protectors such as the following:

 

https://www.amazon.ca/Lightning-Arrestor-Discharge-Protector-Arrester/dp/B07YNH1QVG?th=1

 

You're looking for a gas discharge protector with F-type connectors, 75 ohm impedance, min freq range of DC up to 1218 Mhz.  This happens to be a 3 Ghz protector.  The problem once again is the possibility of a ground loop if this was connected to a house ground point.  It would be better to install this in the external NID instead of the typical cable ground block.  Fwiw, these gas discharge ground blocks run up to hundreds of dollars, so, it all depends on how much you want to spend.  I suspect that typical cable ground block is sufficient for the vast majority of customers throughout North America.

View solution in original post

13 REPLIES 13

Re: Active Splitter EVO1-5U/U Replacement

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

@Edgardo1956 you indicated that you connected the modem cable to the amplifier's passive port.  That port essentially is one of the output ports of the internal splitter.  So, the signal loss thru that port is 3.5 dB, or, half power. 

 

The Ignite modems, XB6, XB7 or XB8, normally do not require an amplifier or splitter installed at the point where the inbound Rogers cable connects to the house cable.  When the modem was installed, either by a tech or by yourself, that amplifier should have been disconnected from all cables, including the power cable and the other house cables pulled back out of the way.  The inbound Rogers cable should have been connected to the modem cable with an F-81 connector which looks like this:

 

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/ideal-3ghz-f-splice-adapter-10-pack-/1000751479

 

If this was a self install, then the installation kit should have included one of these.  

 

If your modem was installed by a tech, then the tech should have ensured that the inbound cable signal levels were adequate and he, or she, should have removed the amplifier at that time.  

 

With your current situation, you're not gaining anything by connecting thru the amp's internal splitter.  In fact your losing 3.5 dB due to the signal drop thru the splitter.  It if turns out that the modem signal levels are too high, then a Forward Path Attenuator with the correct frequency range should be installed.  Here's one example:

 

https://www.multicominc.com/product/multicom-mul-fpa85-forward-path-attenuator/

 

Rogers tends to use large splitters to drop the signal levels which accommodate the required frequency range. 

 

In terms of surge protection, if you have a nylon Rogers box, known as a Network Interface Device mounted near the home's external electrical meter, that box will contain a cable ground block which is a standard installation for houses.  That cable ground block should have a copper ground cable connected to it.  That ground cable should be evident as it leaves the box and connects to a ground clamp that is attached to the electrical meter box. That cable ground block should provide adequate surge protection although I sometimes wonder if the clamp on the meter box is adequate for the job. 

 

The cable ground block will look something like this:

 

https://www.maddison.ca/mad-001287.html?___store=english&___from_store=default

 

If the copper ground cable is connected to the external electrical meter box, then the cable system aluminum braid is grounded to the house electrical system.  If the amplifier is also grounded to the house plumbing system for example, then that ground should be removed as you can have a ground loop running where each ground point is at a different electrical potential. 

 

 

Your amplifier has an upstream frequency range of 5 to 42 Mhz, a downstream range of 54 to 1002 Mhz and a frequency range of 5 to 1002 Mhz on the Voip port where your modem is currently connected.  Those ranges are no longer guaranteed for Rogers frequency ranges.  Rogers is changing the upstream frequency from 5 to 42 Mhz up to 5 to 85 Mhz (mid-split), and at some point, perhaps already, changing the downstream frequency from 208 to 1002 Mhz up to 208 to 1218 Mhz.  The next expansion at some point way, way down the road might see the upstream frequencies run from 5 to 208 Mhz (high-split), and the downstream run from 208 to 1794 Mhz.  Beyond that Docsis 4 is looking at running frequencies up to 3 Ghz.  That's a very long way down the road.  Will Rogers ever get there?? Don't know.  Personal opinion, fibre would be the way to go instead of changing everything to run 3 Ghz over cable.    

 

So, bottom line, your amplifier might be causing problems that you're not aware of, simply due to the change in cable operating frequencies.  You won't know unless you install a high frequency F-81 connector as shown above and then look at the signal levels to determine the upstream and downstream frequencies that are in use.  I'd remove the amplifier permanently and not give it a second thought.

 

In terms of the future owners, let them decide what they want to do.  Way down the road what you might find is fibre to the home, with fibre in home or possibly ethernet.  

 

If you're really worried about surge protection, have a look at the external NID and confirm that a copper ground cable connects to the electrical meter box. 

 

You can get gas surge protectors such as the following:

 

https://www.amazon.ca/Lightning-Arrestor-Discharge-Protector-Arrester/dp/B07YNH1QVG?th=1

 

You're looking for a gas discharge protector with F-type connectors, 75 ohm impedance, min freq range of DC up to 1218 Mhz.  This happens to be a 3 Ghz protector.  The problem once again is the possibility of a ground loop if this was connected to a house ground point.  It would be better to install this in the external NID instead of the typical cable ground block.  Fwiw, these gas discharge ground blocks run up to hundreds of dollars, so, it all depends on how much you want to spend.  I suspect that typical cable ground block is sufficient for the vast majority of customers throughout North America.

Re: Active Splitter EVO1-5U/U Replacement

Edgardo1956
I plan to stick around

Thank you so much for your prompt response and support.

You are right of course. When we replaced the old bulky TV boxes with the new device, the technician that installed the Ignite modem did not remove the amplifier / splitter. I will do as you suggested, buy the connector and then connect the two coax cable with it and remove the Splitter altogether.  

Once again, thank you for your prompt response.

 

Re: Active Splitter EVO1-5U/U Replacement

@Edgardo1956 don't know why the tech didn't remove the amplifier at the time.  We'll have a better idea when we can see the modem's signal levels as indicated below. 

 

Assuming that you end up buying a package of five or ten 3 Ghz connectors, also replace the F-81 connector that sits in the wallplate that the modem is connected to.  You should be able to find something like a five pack, but, don't quote me on that one.  If you happen to cross paths with a Rogers field tech, ask him or her for a couple of connectors. 

 

When those are installed you can copy the modem's signal levels from the modem's user interface and paste them into a post so we can determine if they're ok, to high or too low.  

 

Those modem levels are found in Gateway >> Connection >> WAN Network (?).  You should see three data tables there, downstream, upstream and codewords.  To copy the tables, one at a time, place your curser just ahead of the first character in the table.  Hold down the shift key and scroll down and to the right until the curser is sitting just after the last character in the table.  Release the shift key and with the data still selected, use Ctrl c to copy the data.  In a new post, use Ctrl v to paste in the data.  Please do that for all three tables.  You can use the keyboard arrow keys to scroll down and to the right to the end of the table. 

 

 

Re: Active Splitter EVO1-5U/U Replacement

Edgardo1956
I plan to stick around

Actually, when I called Rogers on Friday, that is when the issued occurred, I've got a booking for today Sunday March 12, 2023 for a technician to be here at the house, but because I managed to solved the issue, well,  kind of, Rogers cancelled the visit. In hindsight,  it would been beneficiary for the technician to be here and do the checking himself / herself.

I did have one of the connectors you mentioned in the house and now I have the two coax cables connected together, and the splitter is gone.

One last question if I may. I have never accessed the Ignite modem, it was never a need to do so. I have my own router, ASUS RT-AX88U, connected to it and that is the one I manage. Sorry for the perhaps silly question, how can I access the Ignite modem settings? It looks like there is an App for it, but not sure if that is the way to do it.

Re: Active Splitter EVO1-5U/U Replacement

@Edgardo1956 when it comes to all of this cable tech, there's no such thing as a silly question 🙂  Ask away .....

 

And .... this is actually a good question these days.  You could try accessing the modem thru the router by using 10.0.0.1 as the modem's login address and see if that works.  I hope that the end users can at least check the signal levels, but, I'm not entirely sure at this point.  @-G- is the expert on this one, so hopefully he can provide some sage advice on modem access versus using the app. 

 

Worst case scenario, send a message to the moderators at @CommunityHelps.  Follow that link to their public page when you're logged into the forum.  That page will have a link on the right hand side to Send a Message.  Follow that link to the message composition page.  The address will fill in automatically.  Fill in the subject and details and hit Send Message when you're ready.  Include your account number and if possible the MAC address off of the back of bottom of the modem.  The MAC address will allow the moderators to easily find your modem in the system.  Ask the moderators to check your signal levels to see if they're ok. 

 

Is the modem running in Bridge mode?

 

Edit:  To check for inbound messages from the moderators, when you're logged into the forum you'll see a number overlaying the envelope symbol in the upper right hand corner of the page.  That indicates an inbound message is waiting for you.  Follow that envelope symbol, which is also a link, down to the message inbox. 

 

If that F-81 connector has been around for, .... forever, I recommend buying a couple of high frequency connectors as indicated above.  The older F-81 connectors were built for 750 Mhz (?) or probably 1002 Mhz(?), which won't support the higher frequencies up to 1218 Mhz. 

 

In the path from the end of the Rogers cable up to the modem, there shouldn't be any other splitters installed which will drop the signal levels to the modem.  This should be a single cable path, no amps, no splitters.

Re: Active Splitter EVO1-5U/U Replacement

Edgardo1956
I plan to stick around

Using 10.0.0.1 works and asks for a user ID and Password however, I do not have a clue what they are. For sure are not the default Admin and Password. Regarding the bridged question, I guess this can be checked once one manages to log in to the modem.

Re: Active Splitter EVO1-5U/U Replacement

Edgardo1956
I plan to stick around

Well, I am in. The default Password is case sensitive and should have been password. Just changed it with a proper password now. Looking for the levels now.

Re: Active Splitter EVO1-5U/U Replacement

Edgardo1956
I plan to stick around

I managed to get all the information you requested. Regarding the bridge question, it is disabled. Regarding the tables information requested before, here are the values

IndexLock StatusFrequencySNRPower LevelModulation

Downstream
Channel Bonding Value
4
5
6
7
2
3
1
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
0
0
33
34
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
 
 
Locked
Locked
591000000
597000000
603000000
609000000
579000000
585000000
279000000
615000000
621000000
633000000
639000000
645000000
651000000
657000000
663000000
669000000
675000000
681000000
687000000
693000000
699000000
705000000
711000000
717000000
723000000
825000000
831000000
837000000
843000000
849000000
855000000
861000000
 
 
352800000
218800000
38.605377
38.983261
38.983261
40.366287
38.983261
38.983261
38.983261
38.983261
38.605377
38.605377
38.983261
38.605377
38.983261
38.983261
38.605377
38.983261
38.605377
38.605377
38.983261
38.605377
38.983261
38.983261
38.983261
38.983261
38.983261
38.605377
38.605377
38.983261
38.605377
38.983261
38.605377
38.605377
 
 
40.28 dB
38.90 dB
2.099998
1.799999
1.900002
2.500000
1.900002
2.500000
-3.500000
2.700001
1.900002
2.200001
2.400002
1.700001
1.799999
2.099998
1.799999
1.400002
1.500000
2.299999
1.900002
1.500000
1.900002
2.200001
1.799999
1.099998
2.099998
2.799999
2.799999
3.000000
2.099998
2.599998
2.900002
2.599998
 
 
-2.299999 dBmV
-4.000000 dBmV
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
QAM256
 
 
OFDM
OFDM

 

IndexLock StatusFrequencySymbol RatePower LevelModulationChannel Type

Upstream
Channel Bonding Value
1
2
3
4
Locked
Locked
Locked
Locked
38700000
21100000
32300000
25900000
5120 KSym/sec
2560 KSym/sec
5120 KSym/sec
5120 KSym/sec
44.520599
43.510300
44.520599
44.520599
64QAM
64QAM
64QAM
64QAM
US_TYPE_ATDMA
US_TYPE_TDMA_ATDMA
US_TYPE_ATDMA
US_TYPE_ATDMA

 

Index12345678910111213141516171819202122232425262728293031323334
Unerrored Codewords2191321738216232149121348211982106819395192621909318940188101867318522184081822318073179591776817617175021729317138170101687116788166761540415259151201497214804118118
Correctable Codewords0000000000000000000000000000000000
Uncorrectable Codewords0000000000000000000000000000000000
                                   

Re: Active Splitter EVO1-5U/U Replacement

Ok, thats not bad at all.  The target for the downstream QAM256 channels is 0 dBmV, so, your's are grouped around 0 dBmV with a fairly small spread on either side of zero.  The two Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiples (OFDM) channels are ok where they are.  There's no sign of a high frequency roll off over 750 Mhz, so, you're doing ok 🙂

 

Upstream levels are slightly above the usual 36 to 40 dBmV but their fine where they are.

 

You must have rebooted the modem recently as the Unerrored Codeword count is fairly small.  If you want to check on how well the modem is doing with the inbound data, look at those three codeword counts, Unnerrored Codewords, Correctable Codewords and the Uncorrectable Codewords.  If you see that the Uncorrectable Codeword totals are climbing faster than the Unerrored or Correctable Codewords, you know that something is afoot.  

 

The modem appears to be running in its default Gateway mode as the Bridge mode is disabled.  Are you also running Ignite TV which uses the Xi6-A or Xi6-T set top boxes?  If this was set up by the tech, with the set top boxes running it would make sense that he or she left the modem running in its Gateway mode.  That's ok for the set top boxes, but, if you're running some time sensitive application thru the router, then running the modem in Gateway mode won't do you any favours.  If you have any port forwarding that you have to do, running the modem in Gateway modem complicates that process.

 

Fwiw, here's the latest firmware versions for the AX88U:

 

Asus stock Firmware Version 3.0.0.4.388.22525      66.32 MB     2023/02/16

 

https://www.asus.com/ca-en/networking-iot-servers/wifi-routers/asus-gaming-routers/rt-ax88u/helpdesk...


Merlin's Asuswrt:

 

RT-AX88U Firmware version: 388.1 dated 03-12-2022

 

https://sourceforge.net/projects/asuswrt-merlin/files/RT-AX88U/Release/

 

So, looking good, just a question of whether you want the modem to operate in its default Gateway mode or in Bridge mode.

 

Edit:  From your signal data, there's no sign of any upwards frequency expansion, either in the upstream or downstream data.  So, your neighbourhood node is still using the traditional frequency bands for both upstream and downstream data. 

Re: Active Splitter EVO1-5U/U Replacement

Edgardo1956
I plan to stick around

Good Day,

Good to know that all looks fine. We do not have any set boxes anymore, all we have is the Ignite wireless receivers for each TV and the phone line, yes we still have a "land Line". Now that  I know how to access the modem as an Admin I will set the option to bridge. Since I work from home I have my work laptop connected to the rogers modem not to my router, will bridging the modem make a difference?

Anyway, I am convinced that things happen for a reason and in my case, I've learned a lot these last two days bottom line is I wish our Service Desk at work would be as good as you guys are. Really appreciate your support.

Re: Active Splitter EVO1-5U/U Replacement

@Edgardo1956 bridging the modem will make a difference.  At the present time the Xi6-A or Xi6-T set top boxes are running via the modem as is your laptop.  The modem will be running IPV6 to support the set top boxes.  Anything else running via the modem will also be running IPV6. I suspect that the router is only running IPV4 as that is the default configuration.

 

Rogers will only support services when the modem is running in its default Gateway mode.  That is to say, in terms of any troubleshooting, Rogers tech support will only do that if the modem is in Gateway mode.  Rogers does not support Bridge mode, so, if you ran into any issues, you have to be able to flip the modem back into Gateway mode in order for Rogers to run any online testing.

 

At the present time, with the modem and router running wifi (my assumption), you should not be using the same wifi network names (SSIDs) for both devices.  The networks should be separate.  

 

If you decide to flip the modem into Bridge mode, you will have to do the following.  Note that you might not have all of these settings available.  If not, don't worry about it.  I'm running Merlin's Asuswrt on my RT-AX86U and its been a long time since I've looked at the stock firmware IPV6 page.  So, there might be some differences between stock firmware and Merlin's Asuswrt:

 

1.  Set the router to run IPV6 to support the set top boxes.  To do that, log into the router and navigate to the IPV6 tab on the left hand side to bring up the main IPV6 page:

 

  a.  Set the connection type to Native which will display the other parameters:

  b.  Set DHCP-PD to:                                                   Enable

  c.  Set Release prefix on exit to:                               Enable

  d.  Set WAN Prefix Length to:                                  64

  e.  Set Auto Configuration Setting to:                   Stateless

  f.  Set Connect to DNS Server automatically to:  Enable

  g.  Set Enable Router Advertisement to:                Enable

  h.  Select Apply at the bottom.  Leave the configuration page up for the moment.  The router will attempt to configure itself for IPV6 mode.  It might end up with a configuration considering that the modem is running IPV6, but, it probably won't be completely correct due to the fact that the modem is sitting ahead of it, running in Gateway mode.  That's the next steps.

 

2.  At this point, the only device that should be connected to the modem via the ethernet port is the router.  All other ethernet connected equipment should be connected to the router or to a switch. 

 

3.  Open a second tab on your web browser and log in to the modem.  After logging in, navigate to the Bridge mode setting and enable Bridge mode.  I suspect that there's an apply button or something like it on that page.  Select Apply (?).  The modem might boot automatically into Bridge mode or you might have to reboot it yourself.  Not sure at the moment as I don't use that modem. 

 

4.  About a minute or so after starting the modem reboot into Bridge mode, reboot the router.  After both devices are complete with their reboot cycle, the modem should be in Bridge mode with the Router running dual mode, IPV4 and IPV6.  

 

If you log into the router again and navigate to the IPV6 page, you should see the IPV6 prefix that has been assigned to the router by the Cable Modem Termination System (CMTS).

 

5.  Start the set top boxes and switch the wifi networks.  I'm assuming that you are using different network names and passphrases for the modem and router wifi networks, hence the requirement to switch the set top boxes to the router's wifi network.  

 

6.  Switch the laptop to the router's wifi network.

 

Only other point is that the modem and router shouldn't be sitting side by side.  There should be some space between the two in order to avoid any wifi induced EMI issues between the router and modem. 

 

Before you launch off and enable IPV6 in the router, be aware that there are privacy concerns with IPV6, namely the ability to track individual devices thru the use of their IPV6 address.  

 

Devices will default to IPV6 address first, IPV4 addresses second.

 

Windows uses temporary IPV6 addresses, where you can control the rate of change of that address.  Not sure about Android which is used in cell phones or what Apple does with their devices. 

 

Here's a little reading on IPV6 privacy to consider before you decide to enable IPV6:

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=IPV6+privacy+concerns&ei=oFoPZM_yA5abptQP9oeOwAQ&ved=0ahUKEwjPwtPEtN...

 

Hope this helps 🙂

 

 

Re: Active Splitter EVO1-5U/U Replacement

Edgardo1956
I plan to stick around

Thank you for all the details, its a lot.

 

I will look into it and explore these setting options on the weekend. I am working from home and I need the system up and running. I have been working from home for the last 3 years and never had an issue.

 

Once again thank you for your help and support.

Re: Active Splitter EVO1-5U/U Replacement

@Edgardo1956 you know, you can choose to do absolutely nothing, and leave the modem and router in their current configuration.  As they say in the movies, "If it ain't broken, don't fix it".  

 

If you decide to run the modem in Bridge mode, then you have to have to take the set top box IPV6 requirements into consideration. 

 

The one problem I can see at the moment is if you're running the router in full router mode with the firewall running.  In that case, your laptop which is connected to the modem won't have access to anything connected to the router, including possibly a printer.  

 

You're running a double NAT configuration.  That is to say that both the modem and router are translating the incoming data at their WAN port and sending that out to the required LAN port and device address (Network Address Translation (NAT)).  That's not an efficient way to run a network, but, as long as you don't do any gaming or run any high speed applications where latency is a major consideration, then you should be ok.  Everyday use can run with double NAT configurations without any issue.  Its just up to the user to decide, am I ok with double NAT or not?

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