Ethernet wall jacks question

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I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Re: Ethernet wall jacks question

Ethernet wall port not working.

 

So, we just move into a townhouse about a month ago.

Before we move in, the previous residents in 2nd and 3rd floors are connecting their internet via Cat5e Ethernet wall port.

But some how, it doesn't work any more after we move in, it doesn't show anything in the PC while we connecting the internet cable to the wall port but it works when we connect it to the modem's port.

I tried to find the wiring cabinet, but I don't know which one is the good one.

I can't open the Ethernet wall port because I can't find the tool to open it, so I have no idea about the situation behind the port.

So, what shall I do now in order to activate my Ethernet wall ports?Ethernet wall jack.jpgSuspecious Wiring Cabinet.jpgSuspecious Wiring Cabinet in details.jpg

 

I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Re: Ethernet wall jacks question

Also, I don't have any Phone or TV services in my home, I only have Internet service

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Posts: 6,450

Re: Ethernet wall jacks question

@Yu1022 did you buy the townhouse or are you renting?  Just thinking here that if you’re renting the townhouse that perhaps the owner might be able to help in this case.  

 

The ethernet wall port looks like it has plastic caps over the mounting screws.  That cap should just pry off with a sharp knife or small screwdriver.  If you bought the townhouse, in which case you can do whatever you want, you can always replace the wallplate if you damage the caps.  I’ve never seen caps over the mounting screws, so, that wallplate is a little unusual.  Personally speaking, if I was the new owner, I’d have no hesitation in pulling off the caps and removing the wallplate to see what else is behind it. That would have happened on move in day.

 

Ok, so, for now the object of the exercise is to find the other end of that cable.  Typically, if the installation is done correctly, the other end of the cable ends in a patch panel that holds the same type of keystone that should be installed in that wallplate.  That patch panel would or should be installed in the same panel that you show in your pictures, but, its meant for ethernet cabling instead of phone cabling which is the connector block that you show in the pictures.  In theory, you should or could have a telephone block, and ethernet patch panel in that panel.  Its possible to run both telephone and ethernet cabling off of the same patch panel, but, not from the 110 Punch down block that you show in your pictures.  That block isn’t designed to operate at higher data rates.  So, you could feed both telephone and ethernet from a singular modular patch panel by installing keystones that are built for telephone or ethernet use.  They're similar but not exactly the same. 

 

So, have a look at the following youtube videos when you have time to give you some ideas of what you need to do.  

 

 

Setting up a home network

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7q-UW9XT4BM

 

What is a patch panel?  Do you need one?

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lg2oGE02DJE

 

Budget Home Network Tour/How to

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=00UTYN9j0FE

 

 

Ok, to track down the other end of the cable, a cable tester comes in handy. One of the following would do:

 

 

https://www.lowes.ca/test-meters-equipment/ideal-linkmaster-tester_g1199379.html?searchTerm=LAN+TEST...

 

https://www.lowes.ca/test-meters-equipment/hv-tools-hv468ct-cable-tester_g1812585.html

 

https://www.lowes.ca/test-meters-equipment/southwire-m400tp-professional-mapper-for-data-cable_g2686...

 

https://www.lowes.ca/test-meters-equipment/southwire-m300p-professional-vdv-cable-mapper_g2686121.ht...

 

Fwiw, I have one similar to the first one, simple but it works.

 

 

Connect the transmitter portion of the tester to the wallplate port and then look for the other end in the basement panel.  Connect the tester to that end to determine if in fact that is the correct end.  If you have more than one end in the downstairs panel, its just a matter of finding out what end matches what wallplate upstairs.  What you end up doing is mapping the ports upstairs to any cable ends downstairs.  Keep in mind the possibility that the cable has been cross connected and that both cable ends might be located upstairs.  If that turns out to be the case, you would want to determine where that cross-connect point is located, most likely in that basement patch panel.  That isn’t a typical installation and results in longer cable runs that can lead to cable losses and slower data rates.   

 

The other reason to use a cable tester is to determine the port capability, and by that I refer to whether or not the ethernet cable and port uses all 4 wire pairs in the cable and that the 8 wire ends (4 pairs) are in fact connected end to end, that they are connected in the correct order or if in fact some of them are actually connected.  Its possible to run 100 Mb/s using only 2 of the 4 wire pairs.  The other 2 wire pairs might have been cut off or bent back along the cable.  That requires a physical inspection of the other side of the wallplate to determine.  If you’re on an internet plan that is above 100 Mb/s, you want to know if the ethernet cable and keystones are connected correctly (all 4 wire pairs) in order to support any data rates above 100 Mb/s.  The tester will tell you if there is an issue with the manner that any of the wire pairs are connected to the keystone.  The more advanced testers give you more information about the state of the connections and make it easier to troubleshoot a problematic cable situation.

 

Another item to note is that it appears, from your photos, that there might be low voltage conduit installed in that panel.  If so, that low voltage conduit was installed to allow for future growth.  The other end of those conduits would terminate somewhere upstairs at an empty low voltage box with a blank wallplate installed.  If you have any wallplates that don’t have any ports on them, remove them from the wall and have a look to see if there is an empty low voltage conduit connected.  If so, you can use that conduit to pull a cable set from the basement panel.  You would have to run a string or pull cable thru the conduit first, a vacuum might be useful for that, or, a snake to run from one end to the other so that you can run a string or pull cable.  

 

You can run a structured wire bundle which includes two RG-6 cables for satellite, cable tv or modem cable feed, one Cat-5e or Cat-6 ethernet cable for data and one Cat-3 (possibly Cat-5e/6) for telephones.  If you preferred to run separate cables, I would recommend running two RG-6 and two Cat-6, or preferably Cat-6a for 10 Gb/s internet/intranet.  The reason for that recommendation is to allow you to park the modem upstairs where you can use it for wifi purposes and then run data back down to the basement panel via Cat-6/6a so that it can connect to a gigabit or 10 Gb/s switch.  Then you can connect other rooms via that switch.  You would of course also have to buy a gigabit/10 Gb/s switch to locate in the basement panel.  The second RG-6 could be used for a cable tv box.  Having multiple RG-6 cable runs to an upstairs location allows the tech to install a single splitter or amp at the basement panel and service all of the upstairs cable fed devices from that single spitter or amp.  That keeps the signal losses to a minimum as each time the cable or modem path runs thru a splitter it incurs losses.  That’s just the nature of the splitter, as you split one signal into multiple paths, each with their own portion of the original signal power.  So, if you can restrict the number of splitters to a single splitter, you will be much further ahead in terms of signal levels and signal to noise ratios at each cable fed device.  

 

Ok, hope this helps.  First step is to buy a cable tester and map out the various ports and cable ends around the home.  From there you can decide what you need to do.  Have a look at the various youtube videos when you have time to give you some ideas of what to do.



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Posts: 2,624

Re: Ethernet wall jacks question

Contrary to popular belief, those wall plates with the caps over the screws happen to be very popular. I used them in my old house, in my current house, my office uses them and my cable Tech friend prefers them.

Judging by the pic the wall jack may not be terminated properly to the box strip. It looks like only the blue/blue white pair are punched down. Ethernet requires all 4 pairs to work. Plus u need a cable coming off the bix going into a switch or your modems rj45 port. Otherwise the Jack would be useless.


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Re: Ethernet wall jacks question

The question is, where is the other end of the cable that connects to that wallport.  It doesn't show up in the photos and I don't think anyone can assume from the photos that the 100 block is used for any internet cabling.  It might only be used for telephone cabling.  @Yu1022 will have to do some cable tracing to determine where each cable runs to, determine if they connect to the 100 block or if they connect to a loose Cat-5 keystone or RJ-45 connector that might have been used previously to connect to a modem or router.



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Posts: 2,624

Re: Ethernet wall jacks question

Hello,

 

I can shed some more light on this question.  Most Condos and newer homes, are usually wired with 4 pair cat5e Ethernet wire to each wall jack in the condo or house and they go to a central closet.   Although the jacks are using Ethernet Wires, most of the time they are configured as Telephone jacks and terminated to a RJ11 wall plate and only the Blue/Blue White pairs are punched down on the Bix Strip.

 

No one is stopping you from using the existing wires/wall jacks in your house or condo as Ethernet jacks, but they first must be wired correctly and disconnected from the telephone signal to be used properly.  I have done this kind of work before, if it is not working its possible someone disconnected it, and its usually leave it to the pro's if you are not comfortable with tinkering around with it. Note: Rogers does not usually touch internal wires as they only are responsible for running the Coax TO your modem so hire a pro if u really need it done or ask one of us for advice



I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Ethernet wall jacks question

Hi @Datalink,

 

First of all, thank you very much for your posts under this thread. This was all really informative and definitely helped improve my understanding in this field. 

I have one question. In my house, I want to plug the ethernet cable to my tv box - compatible with RJ45 connectors. However, my builder gave me RJ11 connectors with CAT5 wire. So, if I buy the given adaptor, will it work for my TV box? Also, I have read somewhere that for RJ11/CAT5 wire, the max speed they can give is 24mbps. Is that correct?

I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Ethernet wall jacks question

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Re: Ethernet wall jacks question

Hi @Harry112358 its possible that the adapter might work, but, the bigger problem is the connection at the other end of the cable in question.  If that cable is connected to an RJ-11 telephone jack, that implies that the other end is probably connected to a 66 block, which is used for telephone systems.  If you look at the bottom picture of the post above, 

 

https://communityforums.rogers.com/t5/Internet/Ethernet-wall-jacks-question/m-p/402954#M48042

 

you will see a 66 block, which is typically used in telephone systems.  That block is usually installed vertically, with the incoming telephone cable connected on the left hand side and the house telephone cables connected to the right hand side.  Normally, you would only see two wires connected for all cables, which is the blue/white, and white/blue wires.  They form one pair of the four pairs in Cat 5e/6 ethernet cables.  

 

It might be possible that the left hand side has all 4 wire pairs connected, but, typically only the blue/white and white/blue pair is actually used.  The other wires are either wrapped back along the cable or cut off.

 

So, if this is the case, that you actually have a 66 block sitting in the structured wiring cabinet, you would need to determine which cable is the other end of the cable in question.  Then you would have to disconnect it and install a proper ethernet keystone.  You can use a cable tracer to find the specific cable if you can't easily follow the cable in the basement back towards its upstairs location, confirming that the cable that you've identified is the correct cable. 

 

There is always the possibility that someone installed ethernet keystones at the structured wiring cabinet.  If so, that would be easy to recognize as the keystones are marked Cat-5e or Cat 6 for example on the front of the keystone.   You would have to see what's installed in the cabinet, a 66 block or keystones.  

 

Assuming that a 66 block in installed, as I indicated above, its a matter of determining which cable is the cable in question and then installing a proper ethernet keystone.  That's actually pretty easy as all you need is a 110 punch down tool, or, you can buy keystones which don't require an punch down tool, you simply follow the colour code indicated on the keystone and the cap will punch down the individual wires when you close the cap.  I prefer using a 110 punch down tool to cleanly cut the cable ends off of the keystone when the cable is punched down onto the keystone.  There are two colour codes on the keystones, 568A and 568B which are usually indicated on the keystone.  

 

Here's a youtube video for keystone / cable matchup:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBgETHJakas

 

Here's a follow-on video that shows the cable installation:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f9BNWpi_2_I

 

Fwiw, installing keystones at both cable ends is actually pretty easy.  You can actually install an RJ-45 jack if you prefer at the structure wiring cabinet in order to connect the cable directly to a modem, router or switch.  In this case you would have to buy an RJ-45 compression tool to compress the connector pins onto the installed wires.  Installing RJ-45 jacks requires more patience.  Its much easier to end up with a faulty connector as the individual wires have to be carefully lined up in the correct order and pushed into the correct location, en mass.  Its sounds pretty easy, but, its a little harder to accomplish if you don't usually install jacks onto ethernet cables.  

 

Here's a youtube video that demonstrates an RJ-45 Crimping tool:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z-YCFIhGhHs

 

Here's the crimping tool:

 

https://www.amazon.ca/Monoprice-Quality-Network-Crimper-100195/dp/B001TUAWH6/ref=sr_1_37?keywords=ne...

 

For the upstairs location, you'll need a wallplate that holds keystones such as the following:

 

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/commercial-electric-2-port-wall-plate-in-white/1000746080

 

That holds two keystones, but, the wallplates can be bought with different keystone capacity, ranging from 1 or 2 keystones up to 8 keystones, just depends on what you require.  

 

The keystones themselves can be seen in the following links:

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=cat5e+keystone&rlz=1C1PRFI_enCA774CA774&oq=cat+5e+keystone&aqs=chrom...

 

With keystones at both ends, you will need a patch cable to connect the keystone in the structured wiring cabinet to a modem/router/switch.  You can use a short Cat-5e cable, or you can buy short 6 inch or one foot patch cables such as the following:

 

https://www.monoprice.com/category/cables/networking-patch-cables

 

https://www.amazon.ca/inch-Ethernet-Network-Patch-Cable/dp/B00A1UPGY4/ref=sr_1_61?keywords=networkin...

 

Lastly, you will or should have a cable tester on hand to ensure that the ethernet cable in question is properly connect end to end, in the correct order, and without any missing wires in the event that a wire wasn't punched down onto a keystone properly:

 

https://www.amazon.ca/SGILE-Network-Cable-Tester-Test/dp/B07DD7PSW5/ref=sr_1_106?keywords=110+Punch+...

 

You can buy more expensive testers, which will give you a better indication of cable problems, just depends on how much you're willing to spend.  I have one similar to this which works just fine, so you don't need to spend a lot of money if you don't want to, but, I'd recommend having a simple tester on hand to confirm that the cable system does work, end to end.  It can save you a lot of time troubleshooting if everything doesn't go according to plan.  

 

Ok, so, short question, will it work?  Longer answer, yes, but, probably not as you were intending.  That RJ-11 jack is most likely only wired with a single wire pair, end to end and the other end is most likely connected to a telephone 66 block, which won't work for ethernet use.  So, there's potential problems at both ends of that cable, hence the requirement to install the correct keystones/connectors at both ends. 

 

Hope this helps.

 

 

 

 

 

 



I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Ethernet wall jacks question

@Datalink,
Thank you very much. So, I think the wiring/connection through that RJ11 connector/keystone is of the internet (and not the telephone) as the internet guy made the connection in the room when he came over to install the modem.

 

Thank you again. I'll buy the adaptors and will get back for any concerns thereafter. Appreciate your help.