Can rogers boost my cable signal for the Cable Modem

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I'm a Reliable Contributor
Posts: 347

Can rogers boost my cable signal for the Cable Modem

Hello,

 

I have a question about signal levels that I hope someone can answer.

 

I have a main line that comes to the side of my house and has a 2 way splitter.  1 run goes into 2 TVs on the main floor and the other run (going to my bedroom) gets split 3 ways into a Cable Modem, and 2 TV's  I have a total of 4 TV's and Internet.

 

The signal I get from the line in my bedroom plugged in directly to my rogers box (no splitters except the one on the side of my house):

 

channel 2 213 Mhz 6 Db
channel 5 543 MHz 3 db
channel 293 753 Mhz 2 db

 

These are good signal levels for my TV and I have no issues.

 

If I disconnect the rogers box, and connect this line directly to my modem, I get the following

 

657 MHz  -5.4dB
597 Mhz   0.5 dB

 

I didn't screenshot every channel, but just took the max/min values I can see.

 

The way have everything wired now, is that I have a 4 way amp that increase the return 7 db and also the forward signal by 4 db.

 

With one line connected to my modem, the channels are as follows:

 

Downstream Overview

Port IDFrequency (MHz)ModulationSignal strength (dBmV)Channel IDSignal noise ratio (dB)
1603000000256QAM3.700337.356
2591000000256QAM3.300136.387
3597000000256QAM4.000237.356
4609000000256QAM3.300436.610
5615000000256QAM2.000536.610
6621000000256QAM1.000635.780
7633000000256QAM0.500735.780
8639000000256QAM0.600835.595
9645000000256QAM1.000935.780
10651000000256QAM-0.3001035.595
11657000000256QAM-0.6001135.595
12663000000256QAM0.2001235.595
13669000000256QAM0.4001335.595
14675000000256QAM0.5001435.595
15681000000256QAM1.5001536.387
16687000000256QAM1.8001636.610
17693000000256QAM1.5001736.387
18699000000256QAM1.6001836.387
19705000000256QAM1.0001936.387
20711000000256QAM0.5002035.780
Upstream Overview
Port IDFrequency (MHz)ModulationSignal strength (dBmV)Channel IDBandWidth
138596000ATDMA - 64QAM43.50013200000
223700000ATDMA - 64QAM40.50036400000
330596000ATDMA - 64QAM41.50026400000

 

These numbers are fine as well and my Internet speed is great.  The problem is that my TV box signal is very high and it causes some breakups at times:

 

channel 2         213 Mhz    12 Db
channel 5         543 MHz      7 Db
channel 293    753 Mhz       6 Db

 

Looking at the rogers setup in my neighbourhood, the linex is at one end of the street and my tap is the last one on the street that is shared by 4 homes. 

 

Is there a way Rogers can boost the cable signal levels so that I can remove my amp and still have decent signal for Internet?


Thanks

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Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 1,201

Re: Can rogers boost my cable signal for the Cable Modem

Hi @mahomed,

 

We'll have to run some tests on your line to see what the signal is displaying on our end. 

 

Was this amp installed by one of our techs or did you install it yourself?

 

Please PM @CommunityHelps and we will further investigate.

 

RogersCorey

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Posts: 347

Re: Can rogers boost my cable signal for the Cable Modem

The amp is what I installed. 

 

I removed everything now and plugged in the rogers splitter and the modem level appears to be very low now:

 

Level while plugged into the -3.5 dB Leg of the 3 way splitter:

 

Downstream Overview

Port IDFrequency (MHz)ModulationSignal strength (dBmV)Channel IDSignal noise ratio (dB)
1603000000256QAM-4.300337.356
2591000000256QAM-4.600136.610
3597000000256QAM-3.900237.356
4609000000256QAM-5.000436.610
5615000000256QAM-6.500536.610
6621000000256QAM-7.200635.780
7633000000256QAM-7.500735.595
8639000000256QAM-7.300835.084
9645000000256QAM-7.100935.595
10651000000256QAM-8.4001035.084
11657000000256QAM-8.6001135.084
12663000000256QAM-7.9001235.595
13669000000256QAM-7.8001335.595
14675000000256QAM-7.7001435.780
15681000000256QAM-6.7001536.387
16687000000256QAM-6.5001636.387
17693000000256QAM-6.6001735.780
18699000000256QAM-6.6001836.387
19705000000256QAM-7.3001935.595
20711000000256QAM-7.7002035.595
Upstream Overview
Port IDFrequency (MHz)ModulationSignal strength (dBmV)Channel IDBandWidth
138596000ATDMA - 64QAM40.00013200000
223700000ATDMA - 64QAM37.50036400000
330596000ATDMA - 64QAM38.50026400000

 

 

 The signal level to my Rogers PVR now plugged in to the -7dB leg of the splitter is as follows:

 

channel 2           213 Mhz      0  dB

channel 5           543 Mhz      -7 dB

channel 293       743 Mhz     -8 dB

 

Thanks

 

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Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 14,170

Re: Can rogers boost my cable signal for the Cable Modem

You obviously have signal issues at the place.

You would be best to callin and get a tech sent out.


They can check from the street, and then all connectors then otherwise to see where it may lay.. could be just the connector outside.. but if at street level, they can put in a ticket to maintenance, etc.

But, when the tech does come out, make sure to NOT have your own amp installed.
Any of your own installed equipment, which 'could' cause issues (though yes, in this case was helping improve), which is not rogers installed... will usually end up in you getting charged for the visit.
The visit should be free otherwise.



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I'm a Reliable Contributor
Posts: 347

Re: Can rogers boost my cable signal for the Cable Modem

I unplugged everything and put the splitter back to the one Rogers provided.  My modem levels are as follows now:

 

Downstream Overview
Port IDFrequency (MHz)ModulationSignal strength (dBmV)Channel IDSignal noise ratio (dB)
1657000000256QAM-8.6001135.084
2591000000256QAM-4.600136.610
3597000000256QAM-3.900237.356
4603000000256QAM-4.300337.356
5609000000256QAM-5.000436.387
6615000000256QAM-6.400536.387
7621000000256QAM-7.200635.780
8633000000256QAM-7.600735.595
9639000000256QAM-7.400835.084
10645000000256QAM-7.000935.780
11651000000256QAM-8.4001035.084
12663000000256QAM-7.9001235.780
13669000000256QAM-7.8001335.595
14675000000256QAM-7.8001435.595
15681000000256QAM-6.8001536.387
16687000000256QAM-6.5001636.387
17693000000256QAM-6.7001735.780
18699000000256QAM-6.6001836.387
19705000000256QAM-7.3001935.780
20711000000256QAM-7.7002035.595
Upstream Overview
Port IDFrequency (MHz)ModulationSignal strength (dBmV)Channel IDBandWidth
138596000ATDMA - 64QAM40.00013200000
223700000ATDMA - 64QAM37.50036400000
330596000ATDMA - 64QAM38.0002

6400000

 

I hope someone can come today to check it out.  Looks like a long wait time with Rogers support now. 

 

Thanks,

 

 

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I'm a Reliable Contributor
Posts: 347

Re: Can rogers boost my cable signal for the Cable Modem

Well that was a waste of time calling... the internet support guys looked at my levels and said "looks ok to me.. no point calling in" and transferred me to the TV group.  That tech was very polite and booked an appointment tomorrow and will try to get someone today

 

 

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Posts: 6,619

Re: Can rogers boost my cable signal for the Cable Modem

Part of the problem are the cable runs themselves.  In the one case, you're splitting the cable to feed the internet and cable tv modems.  So, whenever you install a splitter you will lose at least 3.5 dB, possibly as high as 7 dB if the splitter has more than two output ports on it.  There's no way to get around that unless you use an amplifier.  The problem with amplifiers is that they can introduce packet loss on the internet modem. The amplifiers used by Rogers these days have an pass-through path for VOIP devices.  This is not amplified and is also used for the internet modem, however, just like an ordinary splitter, you will lose 3.5 dB on that passive path.  The fact that this path is not amplified also means that there won't be any packet loss observed on the internet modem

 

There is one thing to check that might help in this situation and that is to determine if your home has structured cabling installed.  Structured cabling is a wire bundle consisting of two RG-6 cables for satellite and cable TV, one Cat 5/5e cable for ethernet and one Cat 3 for telephones, although the Cat 3 might be a Cat 5/5e instead.  That bundle runs from the Structured Cabling Cabinet in the basement  up to every room where it is installed, usually one run per room.  Not all rooms necessarily have that bundle installed.  Contractors typically install one single connector, cable TV or phone connector to its matching cable and tuck the rest in behind of the wall plate, where they sit, waiting to be discovered by the home owner and put to use.  So, if you check behind any existing wall plate where you have a cable or telephone outlet, you might see the rest of the cable bundle.  

 

If it is there, you can put the other RG-6 cable to use.  What you would do at that point is use one run to feed the two tv's in your bedroom and the other run to feed the internet modem.  

 

One problem is the fact that you have two tv's in both rooms that are fed off of one single cable, which means that a splitter is used, dropping each cable signal level by 3.5 dB.  So, from the original feed into the house, you drop 3.5 dB at the first splitter and then another 3.5 dB at the other splitter that feeds the tv's.  If you have structured cabling that means that you could ask the Rogers tech to install a powered amp to the cable that feeds the house.  One run goes from there to the main room for its tv's, another run goes to the bedroom to feed the tv's and another non-amplified run goes to the bedroom to feed the internet modem.  Each tv line would be split, and would end up around -3.5 dBmV if my calculations are correct.  That also depends on the original signal level going into the home.  

 

If you only have one single run going to the bedroom, that is a problem as you don't want to amplifiy the path that leads to the internet modem.  You would have to split that run, which results in a 3.5 dB drop downstairs and 3.5 dB drop at the bedroom.  That might be problematic depending on your original signal level into the home.  If you only have that single run going to the bedroom, you should determine if there is any way to run a secondary cable, maybe even two or three if it was going to be an easy task.  That would depend on whether or not the basement was finished.  Running multiple cables would possibly allow the tech to park a larger passive splitter downstairs, dropping the internet feed by 3.5 dB and the tv feeds by 7 dB.  You would have to take into consideration the original signal levels where the cable enters the house.  

 

So, there are some considerations to look at and discuss as options with the tech.  Part of the techs job is to balance the cable network so that the various modems are running with signal levels that are within an acceptable range.  sometimes the tech has to get creative when faced with a situation such as single runs that are spit for various modems.  



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I'm a Reliable Contributor
Posts: 347

Re: Can rogers boost my cable signal for the Cable Modem

Thnaks Datalink for the information.

 

Yes, the way the wiring is setup in my home, the main line has a 2 way splitter on the side of the house:

 

Run 1 - Goes to the basement and into a 2 way splitter which feeds 2 TVs on the main floor

Run 2 - Goes into a bedroom and into a 3 way splitter:  -3.5 dB connection into the Cable modem, 2 x -7 dB connections into TV boxes.

 

Run 1 Digital TV boxes are only getting a fraction of the main signal as it gets split 2x and each tv is losing 7dB from the main line.

 

Run 2 signal is even weaker as it gets split via a 3 way.  The cable modem suffers a 7dB drop and the TV boxes suffer a -10 dB.

 

My home was built 24 years ago (and thats how long we have been Rogers customers) so I don't have the structured cable you talk about.  Ideally, if there was one drop and all internal wiring, they can put a unity amp and do a home run to every connection.  My thought was to just drop a 10 dB amp on the main line, and then all levels going around to the devices will go up by 10 dB.  The weakest signal will be strong, and the stronger signal stronger.  I figure the amps that Rogers uses would be better quality so packet losses won't happen.  Heck the tap itself has some amps on it so perhaps they can boost the signal at the tap to my home up a few dB and that will improve everything without the amp. I am not keen on having people making additional connections to the house unless they can do something internally as it looks really ugly.

 

Does Rogers have wireless devices so that TV's don't need wiring into every room?  That would really make things easier as there would be only 2 connections:  1 for the TV broadcast device that sends signal to each TV receiver devices in the house, and 1 to the cable modem.

 

FYI, Bell has this type of system and it sounds good:

 

http://www.bell.ca/Fibe-TV/HD-PVR-Receivers

 

 

 

 

 

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Posts: 14,170

Re: Can rogers boost my cable signal for the Cable Modem

Bells ones are convienient that they are wireless.. no wires needed.
But do have drawbacks as well.

Each device does not have its own tuner.. so for each other tv being watched, takes up a tuner on the PVR itself.
You are also at the mercy of having to have good wireless.. poor wireless would be poor quality.

 

Compared to rogers, where each has its own tuner.. is completely its own seperate unit. 
But does require cabling to each room then.



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I'm a Reliable Contributor
Posts: 347

Re: Can rogers boost my cable signal for the Cable Modem

I had the Rogers tech come by and he put an amp on one of the runs that have the old RG59 wiring and that increased the signal by 8 dB.

 

My cable modem line he didn't do anything as he said it was very good even though the signal levels to me look low.  Here are the readings:

 

Downstream Overview

Port IDFrequency (MHz)ModulationSignal strength (dBmV)Channel IDSignal noise ratio (dB)
1609000000256QAM-5.100436.387
2591000000256QAM-4.600136.610
3597000000256QAM-3.900237.636
4603000000256QAM-4.200337.356
5615000000256QAM-6.400536.610
6621000000256QAM-7.100635.780
7633000000256QAM-7.600735.595
8639000000256QAM-7.300835.084
9645000000256QAM-7.000935.595
10651000000256QAM-8.3001035.084
11657000000256QAM-8.6001135.084
12663000000256QAM-7.9001235.780
13669000000256QAM-7.9001335.780
14675000000256QAM-7.6001435.780
15681000000256QAM-6.6001536.387
16687000000256QAM-6.4001636.610
17693000000256QAM-6.6001735.780
18699000000256QAM-6.6001836.387
19705000000256QAM-7.3001935.780
20711000000256QAM-7.7002035.780
Upstream Overview
Port IDFrequency (MHz)ModulationSignal strength (dBmV)Channel IDBandWidth
138596000ATDMA - 64QAM40.25013200000
223700000ATDMA - 64QAM37.25036400000
330596000ATDMA - 64QAM38.25026400000