XB6 - Channels and Power levels

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XB6 - Channels and Power levels

Hey, does anyone know if the Technicolor XB6 transmits at 1watt for both channels 149+ and the lower channels (36-48)? I know the Hitron would use lower power levels on channels 36-48, but full power for 149+.

 

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Re: XB6 - Channels and Power levels


@gp-se wrote:

Hey, does anyone know if the Technicolor XB6 transmits at 1watt for both channels 149+ and the lower channels (36-48)? I know the Hitron would use lower power levels on channels 36-48, but full power for 149+.


I don't see how it can because the maximum power levels are regulated by Industry Canada and RSS-247 imposes a power limit of 200 mW for the 5150-5250 MHz band, which covers channels 36-48.

 

https://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf10971.html#s6.2

 

Edit: Oops, looks like those max power levels are out of date:

 

https://www.semfionetworks.com/blog/5ghz-regulations-in-canada-2018-update

 

I'm trying to see if they obtained certification for the Technicolor XB6 (CGM4140COM) with updated power tables.

... and it doesn't look like they have.

 

https://fcc.io/G95/CGM414X

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Re: XB6 - Channels and Power levels

@-G- the power limits shown in the semiflo network chart are incorrect for channels 36 to 48.  The chart shows 1 watt Max Conducted Power.  It should show 200 mw.  My guess is that's a copy and paste error.  The relevant section of RSS-247 indicates as follows:

 

6.2.1 Frequency band 5150-5250 MHz

 

LE-LAN devices are restricted to indoor operation only in the band 5150-5250 MHz. However, original equipment manufacturer (OEM) devices, which are installed in vehicles by vehicles manufacturers, are permitted.

 

6.2.1.1 Power limits

 

For OEM devices installed in vehicles, the maximum e.i.r.p. shall not exceed 30 mW or 1.76 + 10 log10B, dBm, whichever is less. Devices shall implement transmitter power control (TPC) in order to have the capability to operate at least 3 dB below the maximum permitted e.i.r.p. of 30 mW.

 

For other devices, the maximum e.i.r.p. shall not exceed 200 mW or 10 + 10 log10B, dBm, whichever power is less. B is the 99% emission bandwidth in megahertz. The e.i.r.p. spectral density shall not exceed 10 dBm in any 1.0 MHz band.

 

The previous SemiFlo networks chart was correct:

 

https://www.semfionetworks.com/blog/5ghz-band-channel-availability-in-canada

 

Ok, on to the question at hand.  Does the XB6 transmit 1 watt at the upper 5 Ghz band.  The answer is no and almost.  Does the XB6 transmit 1 watt in the lower 5 Ghz band.  No it does not, as per the current RSS-247 regulations.  Refer to this last above link to cross-reference the frequency bands shown below to their respective wifi channels.  Shown below are the Industry Canada data submitted by the test agencies who tested the XB6 models.  There appears to be 4 submissions, one for the Arris, TG3482ER3, two for the Arris TG3482P which appear to be the same at a quick glance, and one for the CGM4141ROG, which I believe is the Rogers version of the Technicolor XB6. 

 

The upshot of the data submissions is that none of them actually transmit 1 watt. 

 

Submission 1 is the Arris TG3482ER3 which is actually fairly low powered.  

 

Submission 2 is the Arris TG3482P, which runs a higher output power in the upper 5 Ghz band.   This appears to run the highest power output level in the channel 149 to 165 range.

 

Submission 3 is the Technicolor CGM4141ROG which runs the second highest power output of the  three versions.  

 

So, does it matter?  Yes.  If you're in a large house with extended ranges from the modem location, then your choice should be the Arris TG3482P, followed by the Technicolor CGM4141ROG.  I don't know if in fact the Arris TG3482P is available.  

 

If you are going to run your own router which will have better wifi, since you can't disable the wifi on the XB6, then if its going to be running, select a router that has the lowest power output possible in order to minimize the potential interference with your router, which in this case appears to be the Arris TG3482ER3.  

 

I leave it to the reader to parse thru the tables to understand the channel versus power output levels for the three versions.  Look at the bottom 3 lines for the  Arris TG3482ER3 and the bottom 2 lines for the other modems to see the output power at the upper 5 Ghz frequencies.  Unfortunately these are submitted by different test companies, so for some reason, the data points aren't identical. 

 

Arris TG3482ER3

 

Arris TG3482ER3 Certification Number 6670A-TG3482ER3.png

 

 

Arris TG3482P

 

Arris TG3482P2  Certification Number 6670A-TG3482P2.png

 

Technicolor CGM4141ROG

 

Technicolor CGM4141ROG  Certification Number 431C-CGM414X.png

 

 

 



I'm a Reliable Contributor
Posts: 104

Re: XB6 - Channels and Power levels

@Datalink  Thanks.  I was pretty confident in my initial response... then that SemiFlo blog post kinda threw me.  I don't know where they got their latest numbers from.

 

Regardless, all that matters are the actual device certification test results and the approvals from Industry Canada.  Thanks for posting those.

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Re: XB6 - Channels and Power levels

Thanks guys, looks like I'll keep it on channel 149 for now and maybe this weekend if I have time I'll put it in bridge mode and use my Synology RT2600 and see if that improves things. I just moved into a new house without structured wiring so trying to find a central location for the router is a big pain. 



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Re: XB6 - Channels and Power levels


@gp-se wrote:

Thanks guys, looks like I'll keep it on channel 149 for now and maybe this weekend if I have time I'll put it in bridge mode and use my Synology RT2600 and see if that improves things. I just moved into a new house without structured wiring so trying to find a central location for the router is a big pain. 


When/if you decide to deploy an alternate Wi-Fi solution, beware that Wi-Fi cannot be fully disabled on the XB6.  Even in bridge mode, Wi-Fi is still active and you'll still see beacons from hidden networks on a Wi-Fi scanner.  You'll want to first configure the 2.4 and 5 GHz Wi-Fi channels on the XB6 to something that will least interfere with the surrounding Wi-Fi environment, save the config, and then either disable Wi-Fi or put the XB6 into bridge mode.

 

Optional step: enclose the XB6 in a Faraday cage.