Rogers offer for new home

Need Help?

That's what we're here for! The goal of the Rogers Community is to help you find answers on everything Rogers. Can't find what you're looking for? Just ask!
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply
Highlighted
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Rogers offer for new home

We received a Rogers offer for free cable, tv, and internet for 12 months with the purchase of our new home.

 

Can someone confirm if Rogers will install cable/phone outlets as part of their setup for free?  Or does Rogers charge to install additional outlets? for example, additional cable outlet in the bedrooms?

 

Thanks!

 

 

***Edited labels***

I'm a Trusted Advisor
Posts: 32,015

Re: Rogers offer for new home

Hello tkjso

Unfortunately this is a user to user forum so Rogers doesn't comment on here.


As for the offer, the best and accurate information you will get is when calling into Rogers and having then explain it to u and see what they say. Everyone has a different offer and some many have to pay Vs others that don't
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Re: Rogers offer for new home

thank you!

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 13,946

Re: Rogers offer for new home

As for the outlet question..

 

With your rogers package.. you are allowed X many outlets (depending on the package you have).
This just allows you to get, X many boxes, and have them activated, etc.. without paying extra outlet fees, etc.

As for HAVING the outlets in the room... if the room is NOT already wired.. rogers will NOT generally do the wiring for them.

If its a bungalow, with an open ceiling in the basement, etc.. yeah they would be able to run that, but they wont do runs through the walls etc.



Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,141

Re: Rogers offer for new home

If you are just building your home you have a great chance to install Cat 6 cabling throughout the house which will give you higher performance than the usual Cat 5e. That is something to consider. If the house is already built, typically you will find structured wiring installed throughout the house which is a bundle of 4 cables, two RG6 for Satellite or Cable TV, one Cat 5e for data, and another data / telephone cable which might be another Cat 5e or near equivalent which is for telephones.   If your basement is not finished at this point and you have one location for an Audio / Video / Games center you might want to consider running another cable set to that point if it isn’t too late already. You can’t go wrong by having additional cables runs to that area.

 

It is really too bad that contractors don’t finish the job at this point by having someone come in to install connectors on the cables downstairs and keystone upstairs throughout the house so that you have everything connected and ready to go. If you didn’t want to do that yourself, I would urge a new home owner to call in an Audio / Video company to complete the work, so that at every point where the cable set comes up, you have a wallplate with both RG6, ethernet and telephone connections completed and ready for use. Downstairs, you should install an ethernet patch panel so that connecting rooms in the future is a very easy task. Ultimately I think you will find that having all of the wiring completed and tested will give you a great deal of flexibility when it comes to positioning equipment throughout the house.  Here is a link to a google page of various keystone wallplate images:

 

https://www.google.ca/search?q=4+HOLE+KEYSTONE+WALL+PLATE&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:off...

 

The second RG6 cable can be used to support attic antennas for FM or for Over The Air (OTA) TV broadcasts which will give you a better TV picture as it isn’t compressed for transmission. That would require dropping a cable or two down from the attic, for which there should be a conduit already installed. But, with that in place, and the rest of the cabling ready to go, it is an easy task to send FM/TV signals throughout the house. And the best part of OTA, once the antenna(s) are installed, there is no additional cost what so ever. If you were close to the U.S./Canadian border, you could probably receive a considerable number of stations without additional cost.  

 

So while there is a finite cost to do this, and who needs to spend more money when you move into a new house, you would appreciate the ease of connecting equipment at various points throughout the house if it was all completed and set to go.