Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

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Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

I can answer part of this.  Each tv requires its own Xi6 receiver.  Those receivers only have HDMI, so, that will probably impact a few customers.  It looks as if running your own network shouldn't be a huge issue, but, I don't think we've seen enough feedback on that one.  



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Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions


@wayner92 wrote:

Sorry if this was covered, but I didn't see this explicitly addressed.

 

Is there a main TV box and then client boxes on your network?  Or does the modem/gateway act as the main box for TV services?  How do the client boxes connect to the main box?  Via ethernet?  Wifi?  Or both? Does it run over a VLAN or the normal LAN?  Can someone described or draw out the network topology of this all the way from cable on your street to all of the STBs?

 

Like others here I have a fairly sophisticated home network.  I have a Ubiquiti Unifi USG router and 5 UAPs.  I am not interested in a system where I can't run my modem in bridge mode as I want to be able to fully control stuff like port forwarding, DHCP, IP addresses and running OpenVPN server on my router.  I don't want a Rogers CSR to have control over my LAN.

 

So has anyone figured out how to be able to use TV while this is running in bridge mode?

 

There are Android and Apple apps, correct?  What about an AndroidTV app?  What's the difference between using the Ignite app an Android or AndroidTV box and an Ignite box (in your house while on the LAN)?


From what I've understood, there is no main box on your premises. Each Xi6 client box just talks via IP to stuff off-premises. This is different from earlier Comcast deployments where you have a master box with QAM tuners that gets the old-fashioned QAM content and records/streams it to the thinner clients.

 

 

The impression I am getting from what @Gdkitty and others have said is that topologically speaking, this is shockingly simple - the boxes connect to your wifi SSID or your wired network, they get IPv4/IPv6 IPs, and they go off and talk to whatever IPs they're programmed to talk to and do their thing. That means, of course, that these boxes would be on 'your' side of the firewall (which is horribly concerning in some ways, but also suggests that, say, a hypothetical DLNA client on the Comcastic boxes could access content on your network - you could also, presumably, have two networks internally and isolate the Comcastic boxes, though the cabling for that could get ugly since most home-grade equipment won't do VLAN tagging). It also suggests that in bridge mode, YOU become responsible for connecting the boxes to the outside world. The boxes do not have appear to have coax; only dual-band wifi and Ethernet. 

 

I don't know if anybody has actually tried it to confirm all of the above; I, certainly, am a bit hesitant to spend considerably more money to jump into this somewhat crazy new world until someone has reported based on personal experience how this thing works in bridged setups. It's sad, in a way - I live in a place where two fiber providers offer service, yet the main reasons I have stuck with Rogers (other than enjoying you guys' company) are clean, simple, bridge mode and TV call display. TV call display is gone in Comcastic land, and bridge mode is suddenly a much bigger risk than in the old world.

 

I don't think there is a full-featured Apple TV/Android app in the style of the Bell one that would allow an Apple TV to perform all the tasks of these boxes, but I could be wrong. If the topology is indeed as speculated above, then it would be absurdly easy for a client other than a Comcastic box to have access to everything the same way a Comcastic box would. 



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Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

Thanks Vivien - that is very useful.

So when you say that you would be responsible for hooking the boxes back into the Rogers network when in  Bridge mode, what would that entail?  What you have to set static IPs or DHCP reservations for the boxes and do some port forwarding?  I am assuming that this happens automatically on the Rogers/Arris router.  And as you mention this opens up security risks if someone figures out how to hack these boxes as (presumably) they could wreak havoc on your LAN.

Can someone explain why Rogers/Comcast provide their own proprietary boxes?  Why not just sell/rent users AndroidTV or Roku boxes that have a Rogers IPTV app?

It seems like the system is pretty much this anyhow, except the IPTV boxes are proprietary rather than being an "open" box like AndroidTV or Roku.  Any content that you are watching is just being streamed from a Rogers server to your STB(s) just as if you are watching Netflix or Youtube or whatever.

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Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions


@wayner92 wrote:

Sorry if this was covered, but I didn't see this explicitly addressed.

 

Is there a main TV box and then client boxes on your network?  Or does the modem/gateway act as the main box for TV services?  How do the client boxes connect to the main box?  Via ethernet?  Wifi?  Or both? Does it run over a VLAN or the normal LAN?  Can someone described or draw out the network topology of this all the way from cable on your street to all of the STBs?

 

Like others here I have a fairly sophisticated home network.  I have a Ubiquiti Unifi USG router and 5 UAPs.  I am not interested in a system where I can't run my modem in bridge mode as I want to be able to fully control stuff like port forwarding, DHCP, IP addresses and running OpenVPN server on my router.  I don't want a Rogers CSR to have control over my LAN.

 

So has anyone figured out how to be able to use TV while this is running in bridge mode?

 

There are Android and Apple apps, correct?  What about an AndroidTV app?  What's the difference between using the Ignite app an Android or AndroidTV box and an Ignite box (in your house while on the LAN)?


 

While i do not have my own in bridged.. I have been talking with a few who have successfully.

At least at this time, there shouldnt be much of a problem doing so.. as mentioned, as simple as connecting to your SSID, and away you go.
The boxes are supposed to work on Ethernet as well, though I have no tried it myself.

But they all communicate on their own, no central box so to speak.. they all speak back to rogers.

My only concern with the aforementioned setup, would be the OpenVPN.  You would likely have to try and segregate the TV boxes, to make them not go through the VPN.  As they need to be seen coming from a 'rogers' connection, and not somewhere else.



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Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

Here's additional food for thought to add to @VivienM's comments.  Rogers modems at the present time will provide two IPV4 addresses and an unlimited number of IPV6 addresses (as has been indicated to me) while the modem is in Bridge mode.  So, in theory the XB6 might also do the same.  No one knows as this has not been indicated to date.  If this does work, then you could theoretically run two networks via ethernet, requiring of course, two routers.  One network could be dedicated to the Xi6 receivers in the home, and the other network to your own house network.  So, if you had any concerns about a Rogers device on your home network, you might be able to avoid that situation.  It would also depend on the ethernet wiring situation in your home.   You could probably do this via wifi as well, possibly by using the eros mesh network that Rogers will install if necessary.  The complication there is the presence of two wifi networks in the home, possibly competing for limited clear channel space.  Personally I would do this all via ethernet and avoid the wifi headaches. 

 

To add to @Gdkitty's remarks about VPNs, Merlin's Asuswrt allows you to run some devices via VPN and others via the normal WAN (non-VPN) path.  I'm not a Merlin user so perhaps someone who has that loaded can provide better comments. 



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Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions


@wayner92 wrote:

Thanks Vivien - that is very useful.

So when you say that you would be responsible for hooking the boxes back into the Rogers network when in  Bridge mode, what would that entail?  What you have to set static IPs or DHCP reservations for the boxes and do some port forwarding?  I am assuming that this happens automatically on the Rogers/Arris router.  And as you mention this opens up security risks if someone figures out how to hack these boxes as (presumably) they could wreak havoc on your LAN.

Can someone explain why Rogers/Comcast provide their own proprietary boxes?  Why not just sell/rent users AndroidTV or Roku boxes that have a Rogers IPTV app?

It seems like the system is pretty much this anyhow, except the IPTV boxes are proprietary rather than being an "open" box like AndroidTV or Roku.  Any content that you are watching is just being streamed from a Rogers server to your STB(s) just as if you are watching Netflix or Youtube or whatever.


I don't see why you'd need static IPs, port forwarding, or anything like that. It's not like the boxes receive any incoming connections. Not sure how someone would really hack the boxes without having access to your network or redirecting where the boxes get their configuration/software from, either.

 

I think it's important to understand that this is NOT the Comcast model. The Comcast model, as also deployed by Shaw, is a new STB OS that mostly runs off existing QAM-based infrastructure with some IP stuff for some things. So, old-school boxes with on-premises PVR, coax and TV tuners, etc. In fact, from what I googled, in Comcastland, the Xi5/Xi6 tunerless boxes are meant to be 'child' boxes connecting to a parent tuner-equipped box in the home, and it's a requirement that you use the Comcast modem as your router in order for the parent/child boxes to properly talk to each other over IP. 

 

Rogers, for whatever reason, did not want to do that. They want a full IP world. (Why, precisely, you'd want full IP when distributing network TV is a mystery to me, especially if you can't really do multicast all the way to the client device, but I am neither an executive nor a video engineer.) So, the Comcast 'child' boxes have been repurposed as newfangled standalone client boxes in this all-wireless all-IP crazy world where, as you pointed out, your content is basically a glorified Netflix/YouTube/Crackle/etc.

 

Why not use other people's boxes? Who knows, but if one thinks about it - if the Comcast software is designed to run on the Comcast boxes, it seems like it would be a lot of effort to port it to other boxes, which wouldn't be of any use to other cable cos not running the full IP design in the first place. Also, I think it would LOOK bad if people are paying $200/month and getting a box that is identical to the not-exactly-legal Android boxes. 

 

 



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Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

Wayener92.

 

The Ignite package comes with a new router\modem Arris TG3482G I am not seeing anywhere that you can set it up for pass through mode. You can change DHCP network settings but can not disable it. Anything you plug in that's set for DHCP will receive an 10.0.0.xxx IP not 192.x.x.x  by default. 

 

You can set up port forwarding, triggering ETC the same as any other router. It also has DMZ so if need be perhaps you could point your current router ip to the DMZ on the Arris  to allow traffic to your current home network

 

Cheers

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Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

In Gateway --> At a Glance there is a Bridge Mode enable/disable function.  If that functions like the Hitron modems, then kicking the modem into Bridge mode should be simple.  I haven't seen a screen shot of the login when the modem is in Bridge mode.  Hopefully that would show the same Bridge Mode enable/disable function.  If so, then this would be pretty easy. 



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Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

XB6 (Arris TG3482G) and Xbox Moderate Nat

 

Hi everyone,

 

It seems that the new XB6 modems do not properly handle UPNP to open the NAT for an Xbox.  I am getting a moderate NAT and a message that the UPNP was unsuccessful.  As per the Xfinity web site I went into the settings and enabled "Zero Config" under Advanced/Device Discovery which does not help.  I guess I will have to use port forwarding to open the ports but hopefully this gets addressed in a firmware update.

 

Thanks

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Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

@kibosh there are a couple of posts on the Xfinitiy site indicating that Comcast users couldn't get Zero Config to work and that their tech support was of no help.  Have you tried enabling UPNP itself to see if that works at all?  

 

Stateful IPV6:  I have an RT-AC68U and RT-AC86U and ever since the .384 firmware was released, Stateful IPV6 has not worked properly for either router.  The router's user interface will display the IPV6 prefix, but, the connected devices are not being assigned their IPV6 address.  I'll have to check that with wireshark one of these days.