Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 98

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

Well it seems that the Netflix issue IS directly related to the bridging of the modem.  I tried putting the XB6 back into gateway and left the ASUS also in router mode (double NAT-land, if that is the proper term) just to do a quick test on Netflix and it started with no issue!  So now I am totally at a loss.  I prefer to use my own router as it is far superior but it seems I will have to live without Netflix integration.  Since it is the only thing that does not work I am going to stick with it.

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Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

@kibosh, give this a try.  Kick the modem back into Gateway mode and with the router connected and running, ending up with a double NAT situation, bring up the router's System log ..... Connections tab.  It might help at this point to just about disconnect as much as you can or turn off some of the connected devices.  With that tab up, connect to Netflix and then hit the refresh button at the bottom of the Connections tab.  Have a look at the connections to see if you can make any sense of the new connections that pop up.  If you can identify the Netflix specific IP addresses and ports, maybe you can enable port forwarding or port triggering for Netflix purposes when you have the modem in Bridge mode and the router operating as the firewall/router.  If that connected list is small enough to start with, it might be easy to determine the additions to the list after starting Netflix.   

 

When you have the modem in Bridge mode, are you running the DHCP range and Xi6 specific address in the router? 

 

Edit:  With the modem in Gateway mode, have you tried to run the router in Access Point mode so that the modem is controlling the IP assignments?   Looking at the connected tab at that point should give you the detailed IP address and port info that you would need to duplicate with the modem running in Bridge mode. 



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Posts: 56

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

Since both the TV channel your currently watching and your browser traffic for your computer are now running over ip on the same internet connection I would imagine your still need enough bandwidth to handle the equivalent of  a 4: . loooking at sites such as  https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/columnist/2017/12/10/youre-buying-4-k-tv-how-much-internet-bandw... suggests  up to 25Mbps for a single 4K feed and we can figure  at least 100MBps for your data feed for your laptop t ostream 4k netflix. add some overhead for signalling and control and I could see a 256Mbps minimum ethernet channel. and you also have to account for multiple family members using the channel as well another 200Mbps for each and you quickly get to 500Mbps with just 3 or four users using both a laptop and a 4k tv channel on thier tv in thier rooms.

 

Don't forget that the  neighborhood feed is still analog so they are splitting the  rg56 into channels  outside of your house until they reach a point where its fiber in the neighborhood. Ideally you will only have RG56 from the neighborhood tap to your house and fiber behind that tapp to the head end.

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Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities


@Sundog1966 wrote:

Don't forget that the  neighborhood feed is still analog so they are splitting the  rg56 into channels  outside of your house until they reach a point where its fiber in the neighborhood. Ideally you will only have RG56 from the neighborhood tap to your house and fiber behind that tapp to the head end.


I'm not sure where you get this information, but Rogers has been Fibre to the node for many years, often with "loop distribution" so that if one line is cut, the signal can often go "the other way around" to the node.  The "last mile" has been RF-Coax, usually RG11 or better next to the home.  Plenty of bandwidth there to the home, unlike twisted pair.  Inside the home it's usually RG6 or, on older homes, RG59 on legacy installations.

 

Rogers also has not been analogue for years.



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Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

I asked a question not too long ago, but could not get a definitive answer.  Does the ignite IPTV set top boxes consume regular internet traffic, or is it un-metered internet traffic thru a separate virtual LAN or subset or network of some sort?  The reason I ask is because they are offering it only with the 0.5 gigabit ignite internet which comes already unlimited but what if they offer new teirs down the road some peple want to save money and maybe slower tiers will have less speed and have a data cap?  who knows its a valid question and its worth asking



I Plan to Stick Around
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Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

Don't really know for sure if its VLAN, but I have done speed tests with 2 ignite boxes on 2 different channels, and it had no affect on the speedtest whatsoever, as it maintained max speeds both down and up.

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 98

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities


@Pauly wrote:

I asked a question not too long ago, but could not get a definitive answer.  Does the ignite IPTV set top boxes consume regular internet traffic, or is it un-metered internet traffic thru a separate virtual LAN or subset or network of some sort?  The reason I ask is because they are offering it only with the 0.5 gigabit ignite internet which comes already unlimited but what if they offer new teirs down the road some peple want to save money and maybe slower tiers will have less speed and have a data cap?  who knows its a valid question and its worth asking


Having seen a diag output on an Ignite box the other day all I can add to this is that it looked to me like the box was IPv6 only; specifically, it got a full public IPv6 address and had no assigned IPv4 address, yet service was still working.

 

 

The IPv6 address seemed like a standard Rogers prefix so I'm guessing there is no VLAN involved.

 

I'd also guess the Ignite traffic counts towards your cap but it's moot because the fastest package that still has a cap from Rogers is 30Mbps and Ignite TV would be problematic to offer on a tier that slow. Basically, Ignite TV requires unlimited internet.

 

This wouldn't be any different than Bell Alt TV, which works similarly to Ignite TV in terms of transport technology. 

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 98

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities


@SimplePanda wrote:

Having seen a diag output on an Ignite box the other day all I can add to this is that it looked to me like the box was IPv6 only; specifically, it got a full public IPv6 address and had no assigned IPv4 address, yet service was still working.

And when I bridge the modem and use my own ASUS router I notice that the address the box gets is IPv4 in the hidden diagnostic screen.  I can almost get it all working except for Netflix for some reason.  All the other apps and live TV work otherwise . . . soooo close.

 

 

 

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Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities


@kibosh wrote:

@SimplePanda wrote:

Having seen a diag output on an Ignite box the other day all I can add to this is that it looked to me like the box was IPv6 only; specifically, it got a full public IPv6 address and had no assigned IPv4 address, yet service was still working.

And when I bridge the modem and use my own ASUS router I notice that the address the box gets is IPv4 in the hidden diagnostic screen.  I can almost get it all working except for Netflix for some reason.  All the other apps and live TV work otherwise . . . soooo close.


 I have not done any work on the new Rogers IPTV platform so my contribution is pure guessing at this time .... Netflix offers their service via ISP like Rogers throught their OCA delivery system -- OCA stands for Open Connect Appliance --- Link follows that may be of help https://media.netflix.com/en/company-blog/how-netflix-works-with-isps-around-the-globe-to-deliver-a-...

i suspect that it’s tied to Netflix CDN so you may need to find out which DNS is being utilized.

David Mozer
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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 98

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities


@kibosh wrote:

 And when I bridge the modem and use my own ASUS router I notice that the address the box gets is IPv4 in the hidden diagnostic screen.  I can almost get it all working except for Netflix for some reason.  All the other apps and live TV work otherwise . . . soooo close.


Does your ASUS router hand out an IPv6 prefix to your LAN? Wondering if the XI6 Netflix app needs / expects both V4 and V6 to function properly (as little sense as that makes).

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