Rewiring for structured wiring

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I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

Rewiring for structured wiring

We currently have several cable outlets (we only use one), running from a box on the outside to various rooms in the home. As we are renovating our basement, I have access to set up a home run system and centralised wiring, and will be running various drops to the basement and first floor.

 

My current thinking is that I'll reroute the existing lines from the outside box to the wiring closet, and run the active line from the outside box to the closet. I realise the outside box probably has a splitter on it, but that's not an issue at the moment, as we're only using the one outlet. I figure that can be addressed if we ever do activate more jacks, or move to a cable modem.

 

My questions:

1) Am I allowed to move the lines from the outside box (i.e. is it a point of demarcation)?

2) If I need to replace the active line (it's too short to reach the new location), can I do this? Are there any tips I should know about what cable and parts to use?

 

I'm very comfortable connecting and running Ethernet, audio, and electrical. It's coax and cable services that I'm less familiar with.

 

Thanks!

 

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Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 3,848

Re: Rewiring for structured wiring

I'm not sure of your location, but most people are switching to IPTV (IgniteTV), which only requires RF-coax at one point in the home where you place the "gateway". With IgniteTV, the Gateway is also the phone modem and also connects to the various TV boxes either via WiFi or Ethernet.  You may therefore not need to run any RF-coax, except to the Gateway location.

 

Check out the many posts in this forum on IgniteTV as well as the IgniteTV information on the main Rogers website.

 

Running RF-coax to various rooms in a home is only required for the old Legacy Digital Cable which is being phased out over the next few years.



I'm a Senior Contributor
Posts: 166

Re: Rewiring for structured wiring

1) The box is the demarc point, so you could move/replace any of the lines leaving it, but why bother as @57 outlined.

2) Make the job simple and just extend the short cable by using a female-to-female coax inline cable connector (a few bucks at HomeDepot) and a shielded coax cable of the desired length to reach the new location.

However, running a completely new cable from the box the the new location will future-proof the install as cabled exposed to the outside element can degrade over time.

I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

Re: Rewiring for structured wiring

I've wondered about that, too. Most of the reading I've come across recommends 2 coax drops to each potential TV area (for cable and satellite, or a security camera). But I agree that IP is becoming the common mechanism for distributing this. While we aren't a "TV in every room" family, I am trying to future proof this as much as possible, for both our enjoyment and eventual resale value.  So how much of a risk am I taking by not running the coax?

 

We're in Toronto/Etobicoke, so we certainly have access to newer services.

 

Thank you very much!

I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

Re: Rewiring for structured wiring

Thank you. I thought about the connector, but I'd rather have a single piece run. It's very easy to access, so replacing it at this point seems to make the most sense. I'm also running conduit through the joists to outside access points on 3 sides of the house, to make it easy to run new lines in or out, as needed,

I'm a Senior Contributor
Posts: 166

Re: Rewiring for structured wiring

With conduit to/from all key locations then coax could easily be added later, if initial cost is a factor. Otherwise the safe route is ethernet, telephone twisted pair, and coax to all locations. Here is some food for thought.

Eighteen years ago I had ethernet and coax to all locations and telephone to adjacent areas in my condo. The coax has only been used in one area, initially for TV and more recently for the modem. Ethernet was useful in half of the locations. The telephone wire was also used in half the areas, and was needed in another where it was not run (could not have foreseen this at the outset). There was conduit to the latter location but I was unable to fish it through that conduit that contained coax and ethernet. Pulling all the wires out and then feeding all three together would be the way to do it, but I found an alternative.

At this point I have two coax connections coming in from two different external risers. Only one is used and it feeds a modem/router in a different room. Ethernet is distributed everywhere, and one of the drops is to a secondary router. Telephone is all cordless except for the base station.

Going forward who knows what will be required, but the next enhancement is likely fibre as an input which will replace coax. Having it run to a convenient location for equipment could be a challenge. Some ethernet may still be useful but could likely be completely replaced with wifi.