New installation

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I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

New installation

I just received phone, TV, and internet from Rogers. I had an existing threeway splitter as I had three TV's. The installer used the same splitter and one loutlet for the internet, one outlet for my two HD TV's ( used another twoway splitter), and then the last outlet for my SD TV and telephone (another two splitter).

 

I can see leaving the internet on one outlet and the SDTV and phone on another but by splitting my HDTV signal seems wrong as it would cut the signal strenght.  I thought that a 4 way splitter would have 12.5% signal on each outlet. Should he not have installed a 4 way splitter?

 

 

**Edited Labels***

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,110

Re: New installation

What the installer was trying to do is keep the signal levels to the internet modem as high as possible.  I suspect that your original three way splitter was probably marked as -3.5db, -7db, -7db (signal drops), with the -3.5 db port used for the internet modem.  Adding another two way splitter (-3db drop) after the -7dB ports gives you a total of -10db drop going to the cable boxes and phone modem.  Without knowing what signal levels you have at the modem at the modem I can only speculate that they are at or slightly above 0 dBmV, which leaves room for the signal drops going to the other devices.  If you were to log into the modem, navigate to the STATUS..... DOCSIS WAN page, copy the downstream and upstream tables and paste them into this thread, we can make sense of what your seeing in terms of signal levels.  The installers usually aim for a +3 to +5 dBmV range for new installs apparently.  With numerous devices in the home, there will be signal drops from the original cable signal levels.  There is no getting around that.  Normally the output of the neighborhood node is high enough that the combined output levels plus cable and splitter losses results in a final range somewhere in the 0 dBmV range, when all is said and done.  In the event that the losses are too high, the installer can use a inline amplifier which amplifies the signal for the cable tv and home phone modem, and leaves the internet / VOIP port non-amplified so that there are no packet losses thru that port.  The installers job, when all is said and done is to ensure that the signal levels are basically balanced and that each device is running within its specified signal range and that they operate properly when the installation is complete.

 

Can you run a wired speed test using http://speedcheck.rogers.com/en.html or www.speedtest.net using the Toronto Telus server and post the results?  And, what internet plan are you on, in terms of download and upload rates?



I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Re: New installation

Yes you are right.  I just llooked and he used the 3.5dB outlet port and to split the HDTV signals (7 db each).  The internet is on the 7db outlet and the phone and SDTV  are on the other 7db.  Thank you.

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,110

Re: New installation

The internet modem is on its own off of a -7 db port?  Interesting... not what I expected.  The end result then is -7db drop for all devices, so, balanced for all devices.  You actually need a 5 port splitter, but with Antronix they come in 2,3,4,8,12,16 port varieties.  He could have used an 8 port, given the signal drops that you have now, but that would also require using terminators on the unused ports.  So, the end result as you now have it, there is a one to one correspondence between the ports available from the splitters and the number of devices to connect to, which ensures that there is no signal reflection issue with unused ports.

 

http://www.antronix.com/antronix-Products-Drop-Passives-Splitters-results.php

 

 



I'm a Reliable Contributor
Posts: 192

Re: New installation


@Datalink wrote:

The internet modem is on its own off of a -7 db port?  Interesting... not what I expected.  The end result then is -7db drop for all devices, so, balanced for all devices.  You actually need a 5 port splitter, but with Antronix they come in 2,3,4,8,12,16 port varieties.  He could have used an 8 port, given the signal drops that you have now, but that would also require using terminators on the unused ports.  So, the end result as you now have it, there is a one to one correspondence between the ports available from the splitters and the number of devices to connect to, which ensures that there is no signal reflection issue with unused ports.

 

http://www.antronix.com/antronix-Products-Drop-Passives-Splitters-results.php

 


I think he said that the phone and SDTV are off the -7 dB port on 3 way splitter.  These use an additional 2-way splitter resulting in -10 dB drop.

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 8

Re: New installation

Hello,

I just moved into a new apartment building (less than 2 years old). I received a great offer in the mailbox and decided to sign up with Rogers internet. I went to the local store to pick up a modem, plugged it in and no internet. The downstream light is just blinking rapidly. On the phone, we tried moving the modem to another cable outlet along with confirming the serial number, but Rogers claims that the modem isn’t receiving an IP address.
In the store they had mentioned something about the cable lines possible not being active, but the store clerk seemingly confirmed on the phone that wouldn’t be an issue. Anyways, it’s been 5 days now in the new place without internet, and I have a tech coming in tomorrow.
If it’s possible that the cable lines are somehow not activated, why offer the option to self install if it’s not going to work until a tech comes anyways?

Thanks!

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 2,845

Re: New installation

@chrisuz91 : This is similar to if you moved into a home and the Rogers RF-coax cable had not been connected to the home from the curb.  In most Apartments (MDUs) there is an "equipment room" or similar where this connection is made. It sounds like the cable was either disconnected when the previous tenant moved, or was never connected in the first place. The tech should be able to easily make this connection.

 

I'm not sure why they didn't know this to begin with, but often people simply make assumptions that are incorrect (like the fact that the cable is "live" when it's actually not).  In most cases there is a live cable, but as you've encountered, in some cases it is not.