Moving cable outlet

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 9

Re: Moving cable outlet

I didn't say they were incorrect but you would think that on a community question page that an explanation to that degree would be over most people heads. I am not objecting about the answer provided, There was no need for that.

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 9

Re: Moving cable outlet

Aagin where did I mention I wan this fone by Rgoers and for free? Stop assuming things on others behalf.

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,261

Re: Moving cable outlet

Alright, can we return to solving the problem at hand? I can't account for what anyone else states in the forum, but, if you have a hard time understanding what I am indicating, please, please let me know. I'll try to make this very simple.

 

1. You want to move a cable outlet to a wall that currently does not have one available.

 

2. If you had the ability to look behind the drywall on that wall, you might find a set of cables that you can use. That cable set might not be used at all at the present time, or it might be in partial use.

3. Because you can't actually look behind the drywall, you have to do the next best thing. Look at the other side of the wall in the next room. You might see a plain wallplate with nothing on it, or, you might see a wallplate with a cable or phone outlet on it. Either way, that is a good sign.

 

If not, then you will have to call in a Structured Wiring Installer to fish a cable through the wall and install it where you want it to go. The installer would have to run a cable either from the location where the cabling enters your condo, or from the nearest cable location that could be used as a connection point, and run an extension cable to your preferred location.

 

4. If your condo has what is termed "Structured Wiring" already installed and it happens to run to a location in the room that is on the other side of the wall, specifically on that wall, then you are in luck. So, how do you figure that out, so that you know with confidence that you can call in an installer and not have it cost you an arm and a leg. By looking at that wall to determine if the cable set is there, and that is a very simple check. If you have a blank wallplate, or one with a single cable or telephone outlet on it, you can unscrew the two screws that hold it to the electrical box and have a look behind the wallplate. You are looking for something that should resemble the following pictures, without the ends exposed:

 

http://flylib.com/books/2/545/1/html/2/images/f07-09.jpg

 

http://www.3starinc.com/images/super/HNC2_800x600t.jpg

 

http://cache-m1.smarthome.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/8...

 

http://fadden.com/tech/homewiring/images/speedwrap.jpg

 

5. If a cable set that resembles one of those pictures is present, then it can be used to provide outlets on both sides of the wall. If this is the case, you can call in an installer who can cut into the drywall on the other side of the wall and install a bracket, connector and wallplate. It might not be in the exact location that you want, but it should be much closer than the one that you have now. From there you simply run a short cable to a tv or internet modem. The installer would also have to identify the other end of the cable in the utility room and install a connector on it as well. When all of that is done, its a 30 second job to switch cable ends in the utility room so that the new cable outlet is live and available for use. Making use of an existing cable bundle, if it is present is a much cheaper solution. No matter what trade you choose these days, I suspect that calling in someone would cost in the order of $75 to $100 just to have him or her show up at your doorstep. You would have to check to ensure that the company will cut through the drywall, and install a bracket and wallplate. They should supply everything, but ask the question just to be sure.

 

6. Here is an example of a cable bundle with all of the connectors (keystones) attached. These are hidden behind the wallplate when the installation is done. In your case, all you need or want is just the one cable connector.

 

https://farm6.static.flickr.com/5231/5911049732_c98debcf67_b.jpg

 

7. And here is an example of the finished product with two cable outlets, one Cat5e ethernet connector, and one Cat 3 or Cat 5e connector for telephones.

 

http://extremehowto.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/art_60351_homewirelead.gif


If you have any questions, please let me know. It really comes down to a simple check to determine if the cables are already in place, waiting to be used, or if a cable would have to be fished through the wall, if that is possible given its location. By knowing what is in place, or not, you will know if the installer is giving you correct information and not charging you for something that is already in place. Hopefully this will save you money.



I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Re: Moving cable outlet

Sorry to bump an old thread but I have a set of cables that run into my bedroom that aren't "live". Will Rogers charge to have them connected?

I'm asking as the bedroom is a better location for the wireless router rather than the my current location.

Cheers.
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 3,028

Re: Moving cable outlet

@AIH:  The answer is "it depends".

 

- Is the RF-coax RG-59 or RG-6?  If the former, then there may be too much of a line loss.

 

- Is the RF-coax a direct run to the demarcation point in your home where the cable comes in?

 

- For internet, you usually need it to be the "first split" inside your home at the demarcation point to have a good signal.  TV and phone come off after that.

 

- Rogers may or may not charge depending on the complexity of the installation and how much you pay them each month... 

 

Best to give them a call and have the answers to the above questions ready.



I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Re: Moving cable outlet

Thanks, that's the info I'm looking for.

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 75

Re: Moving cable outlet


@AIH wrote:
Sorry to bump an old thread but I have a set of cables that run into my bedroom that aren't "live". Will Rogers charge to have them connected?

I'm asking as the bedroom is a better location for the wireless router rather than the my current location.

Cheers.

If you look into the electrical panel where the cable comes into the home (assuming you live in a home), do you see your cable coming into your home and is there already a splitter that splits the cable into multiple runs across your home?  If there's a splitter and the cable coming to your room is simply disconnected, then all you have to do is reconnect the bedroom line back up to the splitter.

If you don't have a splitter, then all you probably need to do is get one.  You can call Rogers to have someone essentially install or give you one (they may charge an extra outlet fee?) or you can buy one yourself but careful which one you get because the quality varies.  Rogers uses Antronix brand splitters.

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 3,028

Re: Moving cable outlet

If you wanted to do the work yourself, then you'd disconnect the cable going to the existing location of your router (I assume it's already connected and you're looking for a "better/different" location) and connect the cable going to the "new" location of the router where the "old" cable was.

 

The type of splitter utilized for the internet connection can be different from the ones typically used for cable TV in that the amount of signal drop can be tailored specifically and typically upstream of any cable splitters.  An internet connection can also be quite dependent on the signal. That is why an internet connection is usually handled by a technician so that he can confirm a good signal for internet and TV and phone if applicable.