Moving cable outlet

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 9

Moving cable outlet

Hello,

 

I want to move the current cable outlet to a different location (without having to use yards of cable cord). Is there a way that I can move it from it's current location to another location - how much will Roger's charge me for this?

 

 

 

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I'm a Senior Advisor
Posts: 3,508

Re: Moving cable outlet

It all depends on how your cable is routed. Some newer houses have cabling already installed inside the walls when built and there may be an outlet near the new location. Rogers will not do anything inside your walls, floors or ceilings, just staple yards of cable along baseboards and over doors.


SA8300HD, SA8300SD, DTA50, LG-E410B PayGo. Location: S-W Ontario
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 13,942

Re: Moving cable outlet

Unfortunately Oldyellr is right.

Rogers will only run stuff, where its open/accessible.

So if there is an open basement.. they might run it along the open ceiling, and then up through the floor itself into the room where you need it.

But they are not covered/allowe do do it within the walls.
Anything like that, has to be done by the OWNERS.  (or the owner has to pay a company which specifically deals with running wires within finished walls)



Rogers Employee ShakTiburon
Rogers Employee
Posts: 992

Re: Moving cable outlet

Rogers will charge you 49.99 (Regular Tech Fee) to have outlets moved.
But if you already have another outlet in the house that is live just putting the box there will keep it active, because your box is already active in that address.

If you want to move it where the outlet is not Live or there is no outlet. Then Rogers Tech can help you but remember the cost is 49.99.
As @OLDYELLR & @Gdkitty said, they run the wires outside along side of baseboards or cieling but not inside the walls.

If you want wires through the walls, its called 'Fishing' and local companies wiring/electrical companies do that. Sometimes the cost does not justify the simplicity of the work, so it's not recommended but the option is there. Fishing is the cost of the owner. I believe Rogers does have partnership with few companies that do Fishing but the cost (last time i checked) was over $200. This is out of memory, as I don't recall it exactly.

but to be clear, Rogers themselves don't have technicians do fishing. (It's a lot of work) - I am seriously hoping you have a Live Outlet already, because you just need to move the box and it already works.

Give us a little more details if you can. Otherwise I think you have most of the information given to you already.

Best of luck!
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 9

Re: Moving cable outlet

I do not want tons of cable draped all over my condo. I want to know that if where the cable outlet is now (currently on one wall in my living room/Dining room / kitchen - open concept floor plan) and I want to move it to another wall without having tons of cable running along the baseboards etc..
Rogers Employee ShakTiburon
Rogers Employee
Posts: 992

Re: Moving cable outlet

Yeah, then what you are looking for is called "Fishing". Rogers doesn't provide that in-house, and referrs you to their partner companies or you can contact any company you prefer yourself.

Fishing itself isn't hard, but the cost to do the work, most companies charge a lot.
- they make a hole in the drywall fish the wire, more holes in dry wall the fish the wire some more until reaching the designated spot. than they patch the dry wall and clear it, so the holes never existed.

go to youtube and search for "fishing wires" and you'll see what I mean.

What you are asking for, is what I wished for as well awhile back. After learning the cost (and the amount of fishing I wanted to do), i left it as is. wasn't worth it for me.

Hope this helps.
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 9

Re: Moving cable outlet

I guess I will have to find another service provider that has wireless cable then. Roger's need to find better solutions.
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,139

Re: Moving cable outlet

Even if your condo was wired with Structured wiring, which is a cable bundle containing RG-6 cables for Cable and Satellite, CAT 5e for ethernet, and Cat 3 or Cat 5e for telephones, it is normal to run one cable bundle to each room.  As a result you only have one outlet in each room upstairs where those cables are located.  That is a standard installation for home builders and unless you are talking with the builder in the design stage to ensure that you have numerous cable outlets around your home, you would have ended up with the standard installation, if it had even been installed.  That is not a Rogers, Bell, Shaw issue.  That is a home design and homeowner issue.  It is unforutunate that builders don't install at least two runs to each room for future use and flexibility.

 

Here is what you can check for that might make this easy.  Have a look behind the wallplate that has your current cable outlet.  Look for another RG-6 Cable and a Cat 5e and possibly Cat 3 or another Cat 5e cable.  They will be sitting in behind the wallplate without connectors attached. If you have that, great, you have structurd wiring in your condo.

 

The next step is to look on the other side of the wall where you want the outlet.  You're looking for a wallplate on that common wall that might be hiding a similar set of cables if there is no ethernet, telephone or cable connection in use in that room.  The wallplate would simply be a plain cover, to cover the electrical box that holds the cable set.  If the wallplate is on that wall, have a look behind it and see if there is another cable run that happens to terminate at that point.  If so, and its not in use, you can use that cable set to service an outlet on the other side of the wall.  That means sacrificing one RG-6 cable out of the two, so that you can use it on the other side of the wall. 

 

Next step is to locate the same point on the other side of the wall and cut the drywall at the exact location so that you can install a low voltage electrical bracket.  With that installed, you then install a connector on the cable that you will be using and one on the same cable where it starts its run at the Structured Wiring Enclosure which is either in the basement or in the electrical room.  Once done, install a wallplate to hold the cable connector and switch the cables so that cable is live and connect to the device that you want to move.  Done.

 

Here is what a low voltage electrical bracket looks like.  Its made so that it is easy to install when the drywall is already installed.

 

http://www.lowes.ca/multimedia-accessories/on-qlegrand-f9060-01-v9-1-gang-old-work-low-voltage-brack...

 

That bracket has tabs at the back that flip up and down.  As you tighten the screws the tabs roll in to hold the bracket in place on the drywall.  When that is tight, you can then install a wallplate to cover it.

 



I'm a Senior Advisor
Posts: 3,508

Re: Moving cable outlet

Thanks @Datalink for a good description of how structured cable wiring works. My house was built in the mid-seventies, before cable came to my area, but it's a ranch style with a drop ceiling in the basement, so I have no trouble routing cables wherever I want.

 

Just a question on structured wiring. Where would the splitters be, or does each run start near where the cable would come in and you or the tech would install them there? And since each split halves the signal strength, I would presume the connections there would have to be changed when switching from one outlet to another. 


SA8300HD, SA8300SD, DTA50, LG-E410B PayGo. Location: S-W Ontario
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,139

Re: Moving cable outlet

Yep, exactly right.  Usually when the home is built these days, one RG-6 cable is installed that runs from the external connection point near the front of the home to the basement where the Structured Wiring Enclosure is installed.  The cable from the pole or inground tap then connects to that external point.  The splitter is installed on that incoming cable at the structured wiring cabinet and then its a matter of identifying what cable goes where and connecting to the correct splitter port.  If you wanted to move a cable box to another location, then its just a matter of identifying the cable that requires switching and connecting.  When that structured wiring is installed and fully completed with connectors for all cables, upstairs and down, it makes cable, satellite, internet and telephone installation very easy.  Too bad its not the standard for all newly built homes.