Spoofing Rogers attempt

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I'm a Trusted Contributor
Posts: 519

Re: Spoofing Rogers attempt

Part of the problem too is that Rogers does use third-party companies to act on their behalf. Some of these companies really try to give you the impression that it is "Rogers" calling like using "Rogers Communications" as their call identifier when you see the number show up on your call display or telling you that they are calling for Rogers and offering some kind of special deal. They are even aware of all of your account info so the unsuspecting consumer can easily be duped into thinking that the call is actually coming from Rogers. While some of their offers may be legitimate, the bottom line is that they should be telling you up front who they really are. If Rogers is going to continue to use these types of companies, they should do a better job of monitoring their business practices. 

I'm a Senior Advisor
Posts: 3,275

Re: Spoofing Rogers attempt


JohhnyRockets wrote:

They are even aware of all of your account info so the unsuspecting consumer can easily be duped into thinking that the call is actually coming from Rogers.


So how would they access your account info if they weren't Rogers? Would Rogers actually release this kind of information to third parties to make telemarketing calls?

 

Here is Rogers FAQ on their Privacy Policy. https://www.rogers.com/web/content/FAQs-About-Rogers-Commitment-to-Policy

 

If you feel your personal information has been shared with a third party, contact

 

Chief Privacy Officer
333 Bloor Street East
Toronto, Ontario
M4W 1G9 or email: privacy@rci.rogers.com


SA8300HD, SA8300SD, DTA50, LG-E410B PayGo. Location: S-W Ontario
I'm a Trusted Contributor
Posts: 519

Re: Spoofing Rogers attempt

One of the callers we had an issue with was Zedd Solutions. They called us a few years back to offer us a new promo for wireless. They were well aware of what our current plan was and how much we were paying. However, they were not Rogers. I will not speculate on how they had our info, but even after we declined their offer, they continued to call. We eventaully had to block their number. I did contact Rogers about this company and they did confirm to me that Zedd was in fact authorized to conduct business on behalf of Rogers!

I'm a Trusted Contributor
Posts: 435

Re: Spoofing Rogers attempt

Obviously...a spoof! Received today. Mon 29/06/2015 1:06 PM 

Rogers doesn't want to do anything to warn people about this type of thing, so I thought I would alert only those people who aren't sure and who might check here.  Don't click the link for MyRogers in the email.  Smiley Happy 

 

 

Your billing information records are out of date. To ensure that the service will not be interrupted, please update your billing information now.

To update your billing information, click: Sign in to MyRogers account and proceed with the update process.

 

This communication is confidential. We only send and receive email on the basis of the terms set out at Rogers.com.

Ce message est confidentiel. Notre transmission et réception de courriels se fait strictement suivant les modalités énoncées dans l’avis publié à rogers.com.

I'm a Trusted Contributor
Posts: 435

Re: Spoofing Rogers attempt

Here's one with the Subject: Action Required

from My Rogers I Mon Rogers <service@rogerr.com>

 

Is this legit or not?   If you have just received a Rogers First Rewards MasterCard you might think so.

But it isn't!   I found the timing interesting though. 

 

The link is just an ordinary http: URL  with /rhyzrin.com/  etc. etc.

The link to My Rogers is  https://www.rogers.com/web/totes/#/signin

 

 

We noticed you don't have a card linked to your profile. To ensure that the service will not be stopped, please link a card until 31.07.2015.

To link a card, click: Sign in to (link:MyRogers removed) then you will be prompted to link your card.

 

This communication is confidential. We only send and receive email on the basis of the terms set out at Rogers.

Ce message est confidentiel. Notre transmission et réception de courriels se fait strictement suivant les modalités énoncées dans l’avis publié à Rogers.

 

I have tried the suggestion box to tell Rogers to put a NOTICE about these scams on their home page, but they are not listening.

Highlighted
I'm a Senior Advisor
Posts: 938

Re: Spoofing Rogers attempt

At some point, when do people have to take responsibility for their own stupidity and gullibility? How old is the Internet now? How old are these email phishing scams? How much handholding do some people need?
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 13,674

Re: Spoofing Rogers attempt

Thats just it.

You could have a different notification put up every single day.

There are BILLIONS of scams out there.. and they change all the time.. there is no way to keep up.


- If you question/dont trust it.. there may be a reason.
- Dont just click on links... check them to make sure they ARE correct first... looks for NON rogers urls (and just not in the TEXT you see.. as that can be spoofed in the email.. check the actual link it goes to.  Look for spelling mistakes, other sites, etc

- Speking of spelling.. look at the spelling and grammar in the email.. MANY are in broken english.

- When in doubt.. if you think it still may be partialy legit.. it will often say 'log in and update your info'... DONT go via the link.. go to the rogers (or whoevers site) on your own, log in on your own, etc..



I'm a Trusted Contributor
Posts: 435

Re: Spoofing Rogers attempt

 

The main problem is that not everyone is an expert in this area.  Those of you who have a lot of experience dealing with scams and spoofing can spot them right away. But those who are "newer" need some examples, probably 5 or 6 would do.  Many companies, especially Banks provide very good examples of past spoofing and scamming messages to help their clients.  Unfortunately, a search of Rogers for "scams" takes you to one area and all you get is the following general discussion.  This is an extremely general description and it does not help the non-expert with actual examples.  If you get some examples from Rogers, I would recommend posting them to help others.

 

Identify Fraudulent or Suspicious Emails

The following explains how to identify any fraudulent or suspicious emails.

Here are some tips on how to protect yourself:

  1. Be wary of requests for personal information
    • Most legitimate businesses will not ask for personal information, such as your bank account number, in an email or pop-up. Also, requests to go to a website and "update your account" should also set off warning bells. Scam artists try to trick you into revealing personal and financial information to them. Before you give out any personal information, be sure that the request is legitimate. If you're unsure, contact the company directly to make sure.
  2. Watch for alarmist email messages
    • Email messages that promise large sums of money but first require you to pay "inheritance tax" or try to shock, scare, or guilt you into sending money are almost certainly scams. Do not respond to them. Delete them immediately.
  3. Altered web or email addresses
    • In an effort to look legitimate, scam artists will often register domains that are minor variations on actual domain names, like www.microssoft.com. Another common tactic is to use a legitimate URL as part of a scam URL, for instance: ebay.scamserver.com.
  4. Misspellings or grammatical errors
    • Many scams are carried out in countries outside North America where the laws controlling such activities aren't as comprehensive. Watch for misspelled words or errors in grammar.
  5. Look for the lock
    • Be sure that any website where you do enter personal or financial information is secure. Such websites will either have addresses that start with "https", or display a small lock icon in the lower right corner of your browser window.
  6. Protect your computer
    • You can receive full technical assistance with Rogers TechXpert™ service. For more information, please visit rogers.com/techxpert or call 1-866-876-8772. You can also download and run Rogers Online Protection Basic. To download, please visit rogers.com/protect. If you are a non-Rogers Internet customer, download and run another type of anti-virus software, run a scan, and delete any suspicious programs.

 

 

 

I'm a Trusted Contributor
Posts: 435

Re: Spoofing Rogers attempt

"How to tell if an email is really from Rogers"

 

eBay does something like this: http://pages.ebay.ca/help/account/ebay-email.html

 

Perhaps Rogers could try something similar just to do that little extra that is so important for customer service.  

 

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 13,674

Re: Spoofing Rogers attempt

Really just about the most FOOLPROOF way of doing it, is checking the headers..

But even for someone like me, who knows WHAT to look for.. it can be a pain to use and almost impossible for any regular person.

 

Bring out a new technology... someone will always find a way to abuse, create problems, etc with it Smiley Sad



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