You must update your Rogers email account settings

Need Help?

That's what we're here for! The goal of the Rogers Community is to help you find answers on everything Rogers. Can't find what you're looking for? Just ask!
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply
Rogers Employee borford
Rogers Employee
Posts: 145

Re: You must update your Rogers email account settings

The message that you receive while you are browsing is not tied to any webpage and not a regular popup either. It is an iSNS notification. The same type of notification is used to notify users of reaching there internet usage levels at 75% and 100%. This message is simply pushed out to your connection.

Rogers does not monitor your surfing habits at all.

 

Brian

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 16

Re: You must update your Rogers email account settings

iSNS is Internet Storage Name Service according to Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Storage_Name_Service - is that what you mean? That seems to have nothing at all to do with HTTP.

If I saw a message instead of the web pages, then what you say might make some sense (though it would be extremely annoying). However, it's been pushed to the front,  and the content I was expecting follows (see the image I posted, though I crowded the content to the bottom). I believe that requires some amount of inspection of the HTTP data stream in order to merge in the Rogers notice with the web page.  That may not count as "monitoring", but they do seem to be playing with the data I'm receiving from the internet, and I'd rather they stop it.

I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

Re: You must update your Rogers email account settings

RogersCorey, there does not seem to be any method provided to set up an App Password for secondary e-mails. I can go ahead and "Add Another" authorized application but these extra passwords are not accepted for use by Secondary Email addresses...they are only accepted for the primary e-mail address. I have tried this multiple times with one of my secondary e-mail addresses but the App Passwords provided do not work.

 

Rogers Employee borford
Rogers Employee
Posts: 145

Re: You must update your Rogers email account settings


@SheamusPatt wrote:

iSNS is Internet Storage Name Service according to Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Storage_Name_Service - is that what you mean? That seems to have nothing at all to do with HTTP.

If I saw a message instead of the web pages, then what you say might make some sense (though it would be extremely annoying). However, it's been pushed to the front,  and the content I was expecting follows (see the image I posted, though I crowded the content to the bottom). I believe that requires some amount of inspection of the HTTP data stream in order to merge in the Rogers notice with the web page.  That may not count as "monitoring", but they do seem to be playing with the data I'm receiving from the internet, and I'd rather they stop it.


Well, ISNS notifications is what it says on our tools and what I am told. As stated in the article in your posts:

"State-change notification

The state-change notification (SCN) service allows an iSNS server to issue notifications about each event that affects storage nodes on the managed network."

I have to assume that these notifications are what I have described.

 

Brian

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 86

Re: You must update your Rogers email account settings

Maybe I don't know the definition of secondary email.     I have  me@rogers.com and my wife has  her@rogers.com

 

At the 'sign in'   link ( from the email message ) screen I logged in as me and generated    Then I logged in as her and generated.  Went to T'bird and entered my generated password and then wrote hers down and went to her PC and entered it.  All worked fine.

I'm a Senior Advisor
Posts: 2,153

Re: You must update your Rogers email account settings

@timlocke  You understand perfectly what the use of "secondary accounts" is talking about in the Yahoo and Rogers.  We have a primary account that is typically the username we use for access - it doesn't need to be though as a side note.

 

The secondary accounts are the 9 other ones we can use on the Yahoo/Rogers email service.

 

And you followed the steps exactly as should be done.

 

In the original instructions, unfortunately, they did not speak of primary and secondary user email accounts and the steps.  It may seem obvious to someone who works with this stuff everyday that they were saying, login using your email account (i.e., your primary account is me@rogers.com) using your typical password, and then you log out and the secondary account users can do it on your computer or their computer.

 

In my case, I don't know my wife's password (her email is not my business), so she can log in from any device to the member's centre.

 

You are exactly correct.

 

Now another question that has come up is about primary and secondary accounts on the same email client, which is completely doable and common.  You may have one for personal, and one for a personal business, etc.

 

You will set up each account with the passkey.  And my understanding is that the passkey will be different on each client/device (i.e., one passkey for computer outlook email account, another passkey for computer 2 outlook, same email account).

 

The same passkey works currently across devices because they have not fully implemented the model yet.

 

As a past computer techie and documentor, documentation is the same as alpha and beta testing - when you write instructions, you must run them by users for questions and clarity.  I know this too well, I was not a great documentor in written docs, but I could train it well face to face.

 

Bruce

I'm a Senior Advisor
Posts: 2,153

Re: You must update your Rogers email account settings

@borfordand others.

 

HTML injection

 

This is not a critique of this whole discussion about iSCN servers and state change notification just an attempt to clarify.

 

My comment is that the majority of people will have no knowledge of what that means, and it muddies the water on the discussion of injected messages.

 

Before I comment on the first part, my concern and many other people's concerns is the use of html injection for messages to users - it is a quick and easy way to let people know, and yes it is not monitoring, merely injecting of code into our packet stream.

 

I know the intent is important, like the 75% and 100% notifications, but it inherently has concerns for people when they become aware that unwanted code, or even useful messages in the code can be injected into our data streams without our permission, and when it is used in this manner, I would hope that it can be turned off and not seen again.

 

The other problem is that the person responsible for the email may not actually see the message, same as the person responsible for paying for the account may not see the message if it comes while someone else is on the computer - let's say, your child has an email and sees this message while browsing, it will mean nothing to them.  They would have to communicate to the person responsible for email if the parent chose to not allow them to have access.

 

So let's not try to give the technical explanation to clarify the person's concerns about injection of code, they have a legitimate concern, and some find it to be an unacceptable intrusion in their use of the Internet (reason why people use ad blockers is for this very reason).

 

On the second point (you are correct in your description of the iSNS and state change notification).

 

In what you are describing, and I suspect that this is what is happening - the iSNS identifies all computer mac address or name connected to the Rogers customer network.

 

When the web server identifies a state-change-notification (in this case, it is the injected message), the iSNS is being used to send the notification (in this case the notification about email changes) to the currently actively connected computer on probably the residential customer network.

 

I am also thinking that it may be sent only to a currently active computer on the residentially IP address we receive from the Rogers network.  My wife has seen them, but I have not seen a single one yet.

 

A final couple of example where iSNS servers are used - if you have Rogers security software installed, if you are off the Rogers network for over 30 days, it is deactivated until you go on the Roger's network again.

 

An iCNS server is probably storing information from another server that you are authorized to use a specific version of the software.  The final one will be when you take your TV setbox off the network for an extended period of time - the registration will be removed from the server, considering it as stolen or something else - and you contact them to reregister.  iSNS servers are the servers that keep track of all the associated names of computers on the network and the back end servers and information flows both ways.

 

Bringing me back to the other concern - iSNS servers are basically a switchboard - your computer wants to communicate to a Rogers server, or visa versa - it facilates knowing what computers have access to what servers.

 

It doesn't take away the reality that many of us, me too don't like having code injected into our HTML streams.  It is used for important communications, and authorizations on internal networks to send messages to users of notifications of server maintenance, and it also notifies us of upcoming maintenance to our computers from our bank servers, and on Rogers, it is the message server not available if it is down, or the we apologize messages.

 

It serves an important purpose, but people's fear with injection is that the code can be used to do things both direction.  I personally don't see it as a concern in the context of Rogers, but without a doubt I don't like it, and it is annoying - send me an email, a text, a phone call, it is over a month, so send me a letter, put it on my paper bill, on my electronic bill, or on MyRogers for this type of communication.

 

Bruce

Highlighted
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 16

Re: You must update your Rogers email account settings


"State-change notification

The state-change notification (SCN) service allows an iSNS server to issue notifications about each event that affects storage nodes on the managed network."

I have to assume that these notifications are what I have described.

 

Brian


Well, ISNS notifications is what it says on our tools and what I am told. As stated in the article in your posts:

Still not buying it, sorry. iSNS, as Wikipedia describes it, is a management protocol for iSCSI and iFCP, which are essentially networks of storage devices over IP instead of things like SATA. Something you would find at Google or Amazon, maybe, but I'm certain it's not something you would find on my home network.

Could you ask someone there at Rogers just what they mean by iSNS? It must be something else.

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 271

Re: You must update your Rogers email account settings

I see the old passwords still work today.

I'm a Senior Advisor
Posts: 2,153

Re: You must update your Rogers email account settings

There seems to have been no notice of when this officially comes on line - some hearsay dates, but nothing official.

 

But what is new - advise of a drop dead date, and if something comes up to delay it, then advise users - standard industry practice to allow users to make decisions on how to prioritize time.  Understanding and changing password protocols is not necessarily the only thing in our lives we have to make decisions on, not only for Rogers services, but also other things in our lives.

 

It is courtesy and best practice to advise users of changes, or to deprecate a protocol like Chrome did with NPAPI, and yet Rogers never acknowledged this impact on their One Number product.  Microsoft deprecated support for XP a few years back, yet you will still find that Rogers still describes the following minimum requirements for their Online security software.

 

System Requirements

You must install Rogers Online Protection Basic using Rogers Hi-Speed Internet.
Your PC must meet these minimum requirements:

  • Microsoft Windows XP SP3 (32-bit)
  • Microsoft Windows Vista SP2 (32 and 64-bit)
  • Microsoft Windows 7 SP1 (32 and 64-bit)
  • Microsoft Windows 8 (32 and 64-bit)
  • Microsoft Windows 10 (32 and 64-bit)
  • 1 GHz processor or higher
  • 1 GB of RAM (1.5 GB for Windows Vista, 7 and 😎
  • 1.8 GB of free hard disk space
  • Removal of other antivirus software
  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 7+ or Mozilla Firefox 3.6+

Not compatible with Apple computers.

 

Windows XP is no longer supported by microsoft, nor Explorer 7 - only Edge and IE 11 are supported by MS now, and Firefox 3.6 was released in 2008.  Firefox has been through 58 major updates to version 61.  Support for previous versions are ended 6 months after each major release.  Support for 3 series ended in 2010.

 

So that is why I say, what is new - one of my most frequent concerns about Rogers is their total disregard for keeping up on all industry standards, and not providing implementation dates - just vague ideas.

 

I would stop bringing this up as a concern about disregard by Rogers for up to date FAQ and support docs, maintaining support for up to date protocols and OS, if they would start being more open in the provision of information on changes.  It is called good technical and customer support to advise users of dates and to keep up to date.

 

I will give them credit for giving advance warning and clear instructions, but unfortunately their use of the word OAuth rather than OAuth2 led to concerns about the security protocols which was legitimate, and not making it clear that the application passkey was one time only for each device (it is suggestive of it), but they do not explicitly indicate that when the full system is brought online, if you reused the key, it would work only on the first client you use.

 

Nor was it well explained, while they did mention OAuth, which most will have no idea what it is, that the applicatin passkey goes beyond the principle of a password saved in your client and allows the security servers to recognize that this application has been approved by you to access the email servers, and you can remove access -  they also don't mention that best security practice for those of us who used to not save the password, and use that as our security for email access, is to place your own individual access on the email client (do a google search to learn that process), or to put a lock password or code on your device and always log out when walking away and to be aware that if you leave access to your computer logged in, others will be able to read your email.

Unfortunately, there has been much confusion created in this change, it has not been well explained, and there has been much miscommunication and discussion (and I am guilty of it too).

 

Simple communication - Rogers is implementing a stronger more secure access to your email in conjunction with Yahoo.

 

The official implementation date is not set, but we will advise, but all users are strongly advised to follow the provided steps as on the implementation date, users who have not done so will not have access until they make the changes.

 

In the interim before the implementation date, the old methods of logging in with your Rogers email accounts will still work, but we strongly encourage all users to make these changes.

 

If you have any difficulty, then contact us at technical support.

 

 

 

So official day when the standard password process ends - whenever they get around to turning it on.

 

Having said all that, my advice is do the change, get it done, as it will come sooner or later.

Just do it, and move forward.  It is what we have been given, so for those who have to work with the older email clients, just go ahead and do it.

 

Bruce

Order Now!
Wilder vs. Ortiz II Live
LIVE: Saturday, November 23, 2019 8PM ET
Channels: 348 (HD) | 350 (SD) | Ignite TV 499
Price: $74.99 (HD) | $69.99 (SD) | Ignite TV $74.99
DTV can order on Nov. 21st & Ignite TV customers can order now!

Reigning heavyweight world champion Deontay "The Bronze Bomber'' Wilder takes on his most dangerous challenger as he defends his WBC title in a rematch against once-beaten Cuban slugger Luis "King Kong'' Ortiz.