Upgraded to Gigabit Internet - Not getting package speeds

Need Help?

That's what we're here for! The goal of the Rogers Community is to help you find answers on everything Rogers. Can't find what you're looking for? Just ask!
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply
Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,005

Re: Upgraded to Gigabit Internet - Not getting package speeds

@VoodooSquirrel ok, you've received the Technicolor XB6 modem for the Ignite TV service.  Now I understand what modem you have.  I haven't seen the signal level presentation from that modem, so I don't know if its the same as the Arris version of the XB6.  Have a look for a Rogers_network tab or page.  If the presentation is the same as the Arris version, that page should show the channels and signal levels.  The Arris version of that page goes sideways so you would have to take a few screenshots to capture the whole page, ugh.  Don't know why Arris insists on presenting the data in that format.  

In any event, if and when you have time, and if you're interested in doing it, I'd like to see the signal levels myself just to see if there does appear to be any issue with those levels.  



Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,005

Re: Upgraded to Gigabit Internet - Not getting package speeds

@AzaanKamran sorry I didn't get back to you yesterday.  I haven't forgotten about you, just a little busy.  

 

Your downstream DOCSIS 3.0 channels (1 to 32) are ok for their signal level, QAM status and signal to noise ratios.  The upper frequency channels do exhibit a high frequency roll off as is typical on the Rogers network.  That shouldn't matter as the modem is using the DOCSIS 3.1 OFDM channel.  

 

The downstream DOCSIS 3.1 OFDM channel is active as it should be, and as usual, there isn't enough data presented in the user interface to determine the health of the OFDM channel.  Having said that, the OFDM channel starts at 275.6 Mhz and at 279 Mhz is one of the DOCSIS 3.0 channels which is sitting at 4.1 dBmV for receive power.  The next DOCSIS 3.0 channel at 579 Mhz is sitting at 0.1 dBmV for receive power, so there is a 4 dB drop in signal level across that range.  That's not a huge drop, but it does indicate that the signal level for the OFDM channel, which sits in that range isn't at a theoretical 0 dBmV.  Instead, there is a downward slope as the frequency increases.  Does that cause a problem?  Thats a good question.  Because of the lack of data, users of this modem have to call tech support to ask for a signal check, and then ask specifically if the OFDM channel parameters are within spec.  The key numbers are the signal level, signal to noise ratios and the QAM level.  For this modem, running firmware version 2.0.10.36T6, that QAM number should be 1024.  You would have to ask what the modem's OFDM QAM number happens to be.  If its less than 1024, you would not see the maximum data rate on the downstream side.  That might provide part of the explanation as to why your data rates are low.  

 

On the upstream side, you have 4 upstream channels running instead of the usual 3 channels, so I wouldn't expect to see any data rate issues, depending on whether or not the OFDM channel is running properly.  Usually those channels run a mixture of 32 and 64 QAM so its a little surprising to see yours all running at 64 QAM, which is the max value for upstream ops.  Given that fact, I definitely wouldn't expect slow data rates.  The output power levels are a little low, but that's not surprising.  That might be due to a short cable run to the neighbourhood node.  I don't expect those levels to cause any problems however.  

 

Can you remind me:

 

1.  Are you in a house or an apartment/condo/highrise?

2.  How are you measuring those data rates, via ethernet to a desktop, or wifi to a laptop?

3.  What site are you using for speedtests?

4.  Are you on a 500 Mb/s plan or gigabit plan where you should be seeing around 940 Mb/s?



Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,005

Re: Upgraded to Gigabit Internet - Not getting package speeds

@lethalsniper when you have time, can you call tech support and ask the tech to run a signal check on the modem.  When that is done, ask for the OFDM channel signal level, signal to noise ratio and the QAM number.  I'm interested in all three, but I'd really like to know what the QAM level is.  With firmware version 2.0.10.36T6 loaded, you should be running 1024 for a QAM level, but, that number can and will decrease if required due to signal levels and noise problems.  The bottom level is 64 QAM.  Under that and the modem will bail out of DOCSIS 3.1 operation and run in DOCSIS 3.0 mode, using the 1 to 32 QAM channels. 

 

When you say that you have new cabling up to your building, are you in an apartment/condo/highrise type of building?



Highlighted
I'm an Enthusiast
Posts: 954

Re: Upgraded to Gigabit Internet - Not getting package speeds

Apartment @Datalink
Highlighted
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 22

Re: Upgraded to Gigabit Internet - Not getting package speeds

I run on wired and it’s happening all day I’m still getting at the 500mbps can it be the firmware that’s caused plz contact someone from Rogers community to fix this

Highlighted
I'm Here A Lot
Posts: 5

Re: Upgraded to Gigabit Internet - Not getting package speeds

@Datalink 

 

It says MoCA is disabled

And I'm also not able to include screenshots, so I can't post my details

 

But I did find Upsteram/Downstream Channel Bonding Values & CM Error Codewords, is that what you wanted to see?

Highlighted
I'm an Enthusiast
Posts: 954

Re: Upgraded to Gigabit Internet - Not getting package speeds

Is anybody even getting 1gb of speeds when running a test or even close to it ? The most I get is 500-700mb wired and wireless I get 200-300Mb .. I’m on firmware
2.0.10.36T6 White coda modem
Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,005

Re: Upgraded to Gigabit Internet - Not getting package speeds

@lethalsniper, using Rogers own speedtest at:

 

https://www.rogers.com/customer/support/article/internet-speedtest

 

with the same modem and firmware, my max results were 932.7 Mb/s down, 32.4 Mb/s up.  Note that I'm in a house in a typical residential area in West Ottawa.

 

Using the www.speedtest.net:       Mb/s down      Mb/s up

 

Rogers Ottawa server:                        932.6              32.89

Rogers Montreal server:                     931                 31.80

Rogers Toronto server:                       931.4              31.4

 

What are you using for a test platform?  

 

Have a look at the following Microsoft page regarding the TCP Receive Window Auto-Tuning.  What we've seen recently in some cases is that the Auto-Tuning was disabled for no apparent reason. 

 

https://support.microsoft.com/en-ca/help/4494445/tcp-receive-auto-tuning-level-feature-in-windows

 

If you're running Windows 10 there's a good chance that the tuning level is not set or not set properly.  If you're running a motherboard which predates Windows 10, this setting is important, personal opinion.  Even if its set to some level, change the setting to Experimental and reboot the pc/laptop.  Rerun a speedtest using the Rogers speedtest as indicated above in the first link and then try the www.speedtest.net Toronto Rogers server.  

 

For your packet loss test results, they didn't show any packet loss to the MDU/CMTS or DNS, but, they're so short that I consider them as inconclusive.  A short test should run for at least an hour, followed by a 6 hour run, and then 24 hours.  At the end of 24 hour run to the CMTS and the DNS, with acceptable results, you should be satisfied that there are no packet loss issues.  But, you will only know that if you let the test run for a long period of time.  

 

If you're interested to plotting the results with Wireshark, you can use Wireshark to capture the data, store the data and then plot the results to show the return times, looking for any latency issues within the Rogers network.  That is only useful for a test run to the DNS as any test to the MDU/CMTS will automatically result in high return times due to the modem's firmware.  

 

When you run a speedtest with the gig service, the best you will see is 930/940 Mb/s down due to the overhead.

 

What floor are you on in your apartment building?  As I indicated previously, given that you're in an apartment, if its an older apartment building, you might be hitting the performance limit of the cabling system within the building.  



I'm an Enthusiast
Posts: 954

Re: Upgraded to Gigabit Internet - Not getting package speeds

I’m testing on a laptop windows10 and Xbox one both done wired and both test done on Speedtest.net and fast.com will try the Rogers one on the Xbox ... with the Rogers cables we had all our cables changed outside and I’m guessing in the basement of the building and all Rogers panelling where upgraded just this year by Rogers ...the cables into the apartments where not changed ..and also all the wires in the panels where also changed ...I’m on the 7th floor .. I was getting 900mb before when I first switched over to the 1gb package but something has changed not sure what .. @Datalink you have your coda bridged what router r u using ?
Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,005

Re: Upgraded to Gigabit Internet - Not getting package speeds

Ok, so, 900 Mb/s before any apartment building cable changes.  That's the important point to know. 

 

When you say that "all the wires in the panels where also changed", does that mean that a Rogers contractor changed all of the cabling coming up from the basement to a main cable panel on each floor?

 

To find where the problem is, you, or someone would have to park a modem, with a test laptop at the MDU port downstairs, then at the cable port on your floor to see if and where any differences in data rates occur.  This would have to be a step by step test, looking cabling issues and data rate differences.  If each apartment on each floor has its own cable that runs up from the basement, there is always the chance that your specific cable was damaged during the installation or that the connectors were not installed properly, resulting in poor performance.  Any tech looking at this would have to be prepared to take some time to troubleshoot the issue, from the MDU in the basement, up through the cabling and into your apartment.  It probably won't be simple connector swap in the basement.  Personal opinion, you probably need a senior tech (real Rogers tech) who is qualified to work on building MDUs.  He or she should have the experience and equipment to properly troubleshoot the issue.  You might have to be prepared to assist in terms of using your modem and laptop.  If you're considering switching providers, you should see that this is taken care of before that occurs, otherwise, it will be a major pain to address this thru any TPIA.

 

If you're calling tech support about this issue, you should indicate that the cabling in the building was changed, at least to a floor panel on each floor (?).  Do I have that correct.  And, that before the cable change/upgrade, you were seeing 900+ Mb/s and now, don't get anywhere near that.  That tidbit of info should put a whole different spin on the conversation, as this becomes a case of, ok, what did the contractor not do correctly, versus, its old cabling and connectors that might need changing. 

 

Are you using a gaming laptop?  Just curious.  If so, what model is it? 

 

Edit:  Are you in a condo building?  If so, you should be speaking with the Condo Board, specifically the member who serves as the point of contact with Rogers, as he or she should be aware of the contractual obligations on Rogers part.  And he or she should have a point of contact with Rogers for situations such as this.  This sounds like a contractor install problem which should be covered under a Condo Board / Rogers contract.