Technical reasons to move to the new CGN3ACR

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I'm a Trusted Contributor
Posts: 519

Re: Technical reasons to move to the new CGN3ACR

Thank you for the summary. Does Rogers have any clue at all that these problems exist? Or do they just assume that the majority of their customers are computer illiterate and do not realize how bad their modems are when it comes to wifi? Do they even realize that Hitron has a 24-channel Cable Modem?

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Re: Technical reasons to move to the new CGN3ACR

Some of those things, are features as well that are only available on some of the higher end 3rd party ones.. about 2/3 of the routers on the market.. DONT have alot of filtering options, cant put custom firmware, etc, either.
They are not necessarily all PROBLEMS (other than say the heavier NAT, etc), more just lacking features.

 

I dont think its a hoping that their customers are illeterate.... i think its that probably 1/2 of their customers, are just not that technically advanced... and dont NEED it.  That they only use internet just barely.. basic web browsing, email, etc.
They dont NEED anything much more.  They dont NEED the extra features.

 

I am not saying the unit is an all in one solution.. FAR from it.  I dont use it that way.

 

Its designed for joe blow average user.

 

All that being said.. it would be nice for them TO provide something different/better, for the users that DO want more.
There really isnt any good gateways PERIOD.. its pretty much record worldwide, no one has a great one.

That they would provide a modem only option for the users that DO want more.
(assuming, that there would be that much of a cost savings difference between them)



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I'm a Trusted Contributor
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Re: Technical reasons to move to the new CGN3ACR

All I am saying is that there is a big deal being made of the fact that Hitron seems to be the only provider of a 24-channel modem. Since Hitron also offers a 24-channel Cable Modem, this should be made available as an alternative for those who desire it! Period!

 

But let's face it Gdkitty. Rogers assumes that the majority of their customers want a supposedly simple plug and play device and they hope it works reasonable well for most. 

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Posts: 928

Re: Technical reasons to move to the new CGN3ACR


@JohhnyRockets wrote:

All I am saying is that there is a big deal being made of the fact that Hitron seems to be the only provider of a 24-channel modem. Since Hitron also offers a 24-channel Cable Modem, this should be made available as an alternative for those who desire it! Period!

 

But let's face it Gdkitty. Rogers assumes that the majority of their customers want a supposedly simple plug and play device and they hope it works reasonable well for most. 


But what's the advantage of the Hitron modem-only device vs the CGN3 in bridge mode? It's probably the same software with the same bugs running on both. So why should Rogers bother with the logistics of stocking two different models of devices?

 

And fundamentally, the way I see it, when Bell advertises standard 'free' wi-fi, Rogers feels it has to do the same. If they offered a straight modem, especially at lower cost, people who switched from Bell and found themselves with no wi-fi would feel they were being nickel-and-dimed if tech support told them 'oh, you don't want to use your own router? the gateway is $4/month more'. This is why, in my view, a straight modem cannot be offered at a lower cost... unfortunately. From Rogers' perspective, the status quo means that the non-technical customers with very basic needs get the gateway/networking they expect, and the technical customers can click a button and turn on bridge mode. (Note that I don't think Bell offers a bridge mode...)

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Re: Technical reasons to move to the new CGN3ACR

Thats why i brought up the cost on the bottom of my last post.

IF there was a substantial cost difference.. sure i could see a benifit in having both..

But otherwise.. Yes, what vivienM said comes into play.
From a maintenance, logistics, training, support... if you can have ONE that does BOTH.. its alot easier.
As a MODEM, the CGN3.. WORKS WELL.

 

Bell's modems CAN be bridged.. kind of.
They do allow it.. but its a BIG pain..last time i tried on the 2wire ones.
Plus a fair bit more work.. as you have to do a PPoE connection, etc with the router, etc.



I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

Re: Technical reasons to move to the new CGN3ACR

does anyone know what the usb storage path is? I attached my external hard drive but cant access it through smb://192.168.0.1

It was working with cgn3.

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Re: Technical reasons to move to the new CGN3ACR

Its interesting that you were able to get those to work on the CGN3. I haven't found any instructions at all for the CGN3ACR, most likely due to the fact that they are very similar. But, here are a couple of items from the CGN3 manual:

 

The CGN3 provides two USB 2.0 host ports on the rear,allowing you to plug in USB flash disks for mounting and sharing through the LAN interfaces via the Samba protocol (network neighborhood). The CGN3 supports the following Windows file systems:

 

FAT16
FAT32
NTFS

 

   ....the USB LED lights up once a connected device on either USB port is detected.

 

Possibly the Samba protocol has been turned off as a default setting and simply requires tech support to turn it back on. I'd call tech support to see what the CSR can do in that regard. Does the front USB LED illuminate when the USB device is connected? If it doesn't that might be related to the Samba setting.  There is no user access to the Samba enable / disable in the CGN3.  Has that changed for the CGN3ACR, or is it still hidden?

 

My thinking is that step one is to ensure that Samba is enabled, step two: ensure that the modem recognizes the USB stick, presumably by lighting up the USB LED, and then three: access the stick as you have in the past.



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Re: Technical reasons to move to the new CGN3ACR


@JohhnyRockets wrote:

 

But let's face it Gdkitty. Rogers assumes that the majority of their customers want a supposedly simple plug and play device and they hope it works reasonable well for most. 


I am no Rogers apologist by any means, but I do think that (a) that is exactly what Rogers assumes and (b) they are right to assume that. 

 

I'm with GDkitty when he says that Rogers should make something available to satisfy its more demanding/savvy customers, but in the absence of that, the lower common denominator of one-size fits all is most assuredly the correct business decision for them. I am willing to bet that the number of people who show up on these boards and who have enough expertise to even be able to debate these issues as we do, are a TINY minority of users.

 

Unless we have direct experience running a tech business where you have to support tens of thousands of users, I'm sure we have no clue about the challenges of supporting a spectrum of users from 0 to 100 on the knowledge scale, hence you are darn right that you go for the plug an play approach. Support costs and business costs would probably skyrocket if they did not, and then we would all be complaining about even higher prices, or worse service, or both.

 

 

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Re: Technical reasons to move to the new CGN3ACR


@DrMike wrote:

I'm with GDkitty when he says that Rogers should make something available to satisfy its more demanding/savvy customers, but in the absence of that, the lower common denominator of one-size fits all is most assuredly the correct business decision for them

 

 


And they do make something available for the more demanding/savvy customers - it's called bridge mode, which is well-documented and which their tech support reps are trained about. (Many US ISPs, including Google Fiber, do not provide a bridge mode)

 

The way I see it, if you had, say:

- straight modem for $8

- WiFi gateway for $12

... you'd have a support nightmare because the less technical users would go for the cheaper thing and would then feel screwed when it's way less capable than the competitor's 'free' hardware.

 

So then, how about this?

- WiFi gateway for $12

- straight modem for $15

... which solves the problem of the less technical users picking the wrong option and blaming Rogers. But would any tech-savvy user pay $3 more for a straight modem over bridging the cheaper gateway?

 

The only argument in favour of a straight modem over bridging the gateways, I think, is a cost one: why are people paying for functionality they turn off? But if the straight modem cannot be cheaper than the gateways without creating a massive support nightmare... then I conclude the status quo makes sense.

I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

Re: Technical reasons to move to the new CGN3ACR

I do not see any activity on the modem after plugging in the hard drive. i see these listed in the usb storage page in admin:

 
  Action 1 file://192.168.0.1/C814240F1423FED6  
 
2 file://192.168.0.1/diska1  
 
it doesnt change even if i take out the drive. Please let me know if its worthwhile to talk with rogers tech about this.
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