Slow Speeds With Ignite100

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 14

Re: Slow Speeds With Ignite100

I'm only using 2.4ghz.

 

All router settings are set as you described (thank you).

 

I'm running the CGN3 in Bridge mode with the router in full mode (DHCP server).

 

I get the same speed results using both Rogers Speed Check and Ookla Speed Test.

 

I'm running an older version of inSSIDer. My SSID is WIFIGUY.

 

Thanks again.

 

inssider2.jpg

 

 

-clammydog
I'm NOT a Rogers employee, my comments are my own.
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Posts: 6,221

Re: Slow Speeds With Ignite100

I'm surprised at how low your receive power level is, down in the -60 dBm range insted of running somewhere in the low -40s.  Where is the modem and router located in comparison to where your laptop was located when you took that screen shot?

 

Just for info, if you look at Qu Shi 2, that is what you don't want to do, run a 40 Mhz wide channel and step all over over users who are using channel 6 including yourself.  Thats possibly due to running an old out of date 802.11 Draft N router.  The draft N routers were not checked for adherence to good neighbor policies as modems and routers are checked today.  These days, if you set a modem or router for a 40 Mhz wide channel, it will ask the receiving device for a clear channel check to determine if the 20 Mhz co-channel required to run a 40 Mhz wide channel is clear at the receiving end.  If it isn't clear, as in its already occupied, then the receiving device denies the clearance to use the co-channel and the modem or router reverts to standard 20 Mhz wide channels.  If you look at Qu Shi's other network, running at 54 Mb/s, thats an 802.11g data rate.  So, altogether, that suggests an old router is in operation.

 

With all of the other networks running nearby, there isn't any good choice in terms of 2.4 Ghz channel selection.  I would look at relocating the router somehow, if that is feasible, or consider using a 5 Ghz USB dongle for your laptop and move up into the 5 Ghz band.  Are you in an older home which probably doesn't have ethernet cabling installed in the walls, or are you by any chance in a newer home which might have structured wiring installed, which includes RG-6 and Cat 5 or 5e cabling?

 

Here one example of a suitable USB dongle:

 

https://www.asus.com/ca-en/Networking/USBAC56/

 

That larger antenna can be removed.  That dongle is 802.11ac capable which would give your data rates a much needed boost.

 

What are you using in terms of a laptop or pc that you connect via wifi.  That itself plays a big part in this, especially if the onboard wifi card only has one antenna.



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 14

Re: Slow Speeds With Ignite100


@Datalink wrote:

I'm surprised at how low your receive power level is, down in the -60 dBm range insted of running somewhere in the low -40s.  Where is the modem and router located in comparison to where your laptop was located when you took that screen shot?

 

Just for info, if you look at Qu Shi 2, that is what you don't want to do, run a 40 Mhz wide channel and step all over over users who are using channel 6 including yourself.  Thats possibly due to running an old out of date 802.11 Draft N router.  The draft N routers were not checked for adherence to good neighbor policies as modems and routers are checked today.  These days, if you set a modem or router for a 40 Mhz wide channel, it will ask the receiving device for a clear channel check to determine if the 20 Mhz co-channel required to run a 40 Mhz wide channel is clear at the receiving end.  If it isn't clear, as in its already occupied, then the receiving device denies the clearance to use the co-channel and the modem or router reverts to standard 20 Mhz wide channels.  If you look at Qu Shi's other network, running at 54 Mb/s, thats an 802.11g data rate.  So, altogether, that suggests an old router is in operation.

 

With all of the other networks running nearby, there isn't any good choice in terms of 2.4 Ghz channel selection.  I would look at relocating the router somehow, if that is feasible, or consider using a 5 Ghz USB dongle for your laptop and move up into the 5 Ghz band.  Are you in an older home which probably doesn't have ethernet cabling installed in the walls, or are you by any chance in a newer home which might have structured wiring installed, which includes RG-6 and Cat 5 or 5e cabling?

 

Here one example of a suitable USB dongle:

 

https://www.asus.com/ca-en/Networking/USBAC56/

 

That larger antenna can be removed.  That dongle is 802.11ac capable which would give your data rates a much needed boost.

 

What are you using in terms of a laptop or pc that you connect via wifi.  That itself plays a big part in this, especially if the onboard wifi card only has one antenna.


That's great information thank you.

 

I'm in a newer home approx 2500 sq ft. that has Cat 5e in some rooms. Home runs for all media cables (RG-6, Cat 5e, speakers) are centralized near the electrical panel located in the basement. That is where the router and modem are located. Relocating it is not an option and there's no point since WIFI speed tests done right next to this router make no difference.

 

The wireless media devices I'm running are 2 iPad 2's, Android Smartphone, Android TV box, Internet Radio, Chromecast. None of which are AC capatible.

 

With the Asus router as the DHCP server, I'm running with 20mhz on the 2.4ghz band and 20/40 on the 5.

 

Even though the Asus router firmware is very recent I still have signal strength problems with the the 5ghz band. The range is limited and the Android box will drop the connection at times.

 

Do you think I would get better results if I swap out the Rogers Advanced Modem for the Rocket version?

 

Thank you.

-clammydog
I'm NOT a Rogers employee, my comments are my own.
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Re: Slow Speeds With Ignite100

Ok, this makes more sense now.  Router and modem are in the basement and I presume that you use the wifi devices upstairs most of the time?

 

1. If that is the case, then, given the inSSIDer shot that you posted, you would need to move the router upstairs or buy another router that you can run strictly as a wifi access point.  With the number of other wifi transmitters running nearby, the only way to win this is to increase the received signal power at the devices and the only way to do that is to bring a wifi transmitter closer to those devices.

 

2. Having said that, the devices themselves might pose a challenge as well.  Those iPad 2's, Android Smartphone, Android TV box, Internet Radio, and Chromecast might all be single antenna devices.  Just doing a quick check, the Ipad 2 has a single antenna located just to the right of the home button on the bottom of the Ipad.  Personal opinion, I can't think of a worse place to mount it.  It probably should have been up at the top of the Ipad. Digging up the wifi details of each device is the only way to really determine what each one will support.  The number of antenna is important, as is the High Throughput (HT) MCS Index number that the wifi adapter will support.  If you look at the following chart, you can see the various connection rates that are available for devices that run 1 to 8 Spatial Streams (#'s of antenna). The orange is for the original 802.11n rates, the blue has been added recently to accommodate the 5 Ghz 802.11ac networks.  The spatial streams correspond to the number of antenna that the device has, ie: 1 antenna = 1 spatial stream, 2 = 2, etc, etc.  The top show title bar shows the modulation and coding type and the bandwidth of the channel.  The 2 bandwidth numbers for 20, 40 80 160 Mhz are the result of using a large or small time gap (Guard Interval) between each transmission.

 

http://mcsindex.com

 

If you look for example at the 1 and 2 spatial stream (antenna) rates in the 20 and 40 Mhz columns, you will see that having 2 antenna on a device doubles the data rate, 3 antenna triples the original rate.  At the top, this chart really details the effect of having a single antenna on any given device.  You can run a low cost router, or the most expensive multiple antenna router on the market, it won't change the maximum data rate that you will see on the receiving "single antenna" device, even if you are standing right next to the router to run a speedtest.  In addition to the antenna limitation, some manufacturers of wifi adapters don't necessarily support index numbers 1 thru to 7, or 8 to 15 shown on the left hand side.  They might only support 1 to 5, just as an example, so that limits the data rate even further.  So, there are three components to determining how fast a device will run via wifi:

 

     a. Number of antenna;
     b. The MCS index that is supported;
     c. Whether or not the wifi adapter supports both 800 nano-second and 400 nano-second Guard Intervals

         (time gaps) between transmissions.

 

Digging up that information is usually fairly difficult.  This area of wifi performance is usually not discussed anywhere, so the average consumer doesn't know of the effects of the above list and doesn't know what to look for in terms of wifi info.  We see laptops come up for discussion in the forum far too often, where the forum member has moved up in data rates, and has a new laptop, well designed, but, the wifi performance is terrible. The end reason is due to the fact that the manufacturer cheaped out and installed a single antenna wifi adapter, limiting the wifi performance of the laptop.

 

Just to show this on your laptop, right click on the internet wifi symbol on the lower right hand side of your laptop screen.  Select "Open Network and Sharing Center".  Left click or select the wifi + network name link in the middle right hand side of the page.  That will bring up the Wifi Status Panel. The speed that is shown is the connection rate with the router, including wifi overhead, and should correspond with one of the listed connection rates in the above chart.  To obtain the maximum data rate you would see on a speed test, multiply the connected rate by the fraction indicated beside the modulation and coding type.  On a wired pc or laptop, this panel shows the connection rate with the modem, router or switch.

 

So, hopefully this shows the importance of understanding the wifi capabilities of the devices, which the manufacturers usually don't talk about, and for good reason.  Some devices such as laptops can have the wifi card swapped out for a better model if the manufacture hasn't created a white list that limits the internal devices that the laptop will boot with.  Others, such as tablets, phone, etc, the end user is stuck with, so the only way to win this is with receive power at the device.  As that receive power goes up, the devices step up in terms of the supported index number, starting at 1 and moving up to 7 for a single antenna device.  As the device moves up in index number the modulation switches to a more complex type and less error correction bits are used, increasing the number of "real" data bits that are received.

 

You indicated that moving the modem and / or router isn't an option.  Is that due to the fact that the router ports are used to run ethernet connections to other rooms?  If that is the case, that can easily be solved by replacing the router with a gigabit unmanaged switch to run ethernet to all of the connected rooms.  If you have structured wiring in your home, and its all completed so that you have two RG-6 cable outlets, one Cat 5e data port, and one cat 3 phone port at each wallplate, then the modem and router can be parked where there is access to any wallplate, including one that is currently is use to support Cable TV. Our modem is on the middle floor, connected via RG-6 to the splitter which is located in the structured wiring panel in the basement.  The RT-AC68U is connected via short Cat 6 cable to the modem, and via house Cat 5e cable to a D-Link DGS-1008D unmanaged gigabit switch in the basement.  The switch is connected to all of the rooms that have a structured wiring runs from the basement panel.  With structured wiring installed, you have a lot of flexibility as to where the modem and router can be parked.  Its easier if you use one of the RG-6 cables to park the modem somewhere that requires wifi support, and then use the router to provide that wifi support to the majority of wifi devices and backhaul data to the switch downstairs so that you can connect to the switch and then to the remainder of the home.  And if you need additional wifi support, install a second router that is set to run in Access mode.

 

 

Here are some settings that you can check on the router, assuming that they are available in the N66U as they are in the RT-AC68U:

 

Navigate to Wireless ... Professional;


Select 2.4 Ghz for Band:

 

Set the following to Enabled:

 

Enable TX Bursting
Enable WMM APSD
Reducing USB 3.0 interference (this may not be present on the N66U)
Optimize AMPDU aggregation
Optimize ack suppression
Turbo QAM
Airtime Fairness
Explicit Beamforming
Universal Beamforming

 

Set: Tx power adjustment full right to Performance

 

Select  Apply to save the changes.

 

 

Select 5.0 Ghz for Band:

 

Set the following to Enabled:

 

Enable TX Bursting
Enable WMM APSD
Optimize AMPDU aggregation
Optimize ack suppression
Airtime Fairness
802.11ac Beamforming
Universal Beamforming

 

Set: Tx power adjustment full right to Performance

 

Select  Apply to save the changes.

 

If you had to change or enable any of those, reboot the N66U.

 

 

Hope this helps.



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 14

Re: Slow Speeds With Ignite100


@Datalink wrote:

 

 

<SNIPPED> 

 

Hope this helps.


Absolutely!

I learned more about WIFI in your last post than I ever did reading dozens of online help pages! 

 

I really like the idea of relocating my modem and using a switch in the basement for the Cat 5's. I will seriously consider doing that. 

 

I've also tweaked all of the common settings as you described on the Asus router.

 

Thanks again. I really appreciate your detailed responses.

 

-clammydog
I'm NOT a Rogers employee, my comments are my own.
Resident Expert
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Posts: 6,221

Re: Slow Speeds With Ignite100

With the modem relocated upstairs, it may be easier to keep an eye on it and determine if and when anything is going wrong.  I've found that with the CGN3ACSMR and now the CGNM-3552, that's a rare occurrence, but its handy to have both on hand for test purposes.

 

For the switch, the current version of my switch is a D-Link DGS-1008G.

 

http://ca.dlink.com/products/connect/8-port-gigabit-desktop-switch/

 

Just have to ensure that:

 

1.  what you buy is an unmanaged switch if you want plug and play capability;

2.  that it has gigabit ports; and 

3.  that the switch itself is a gigabit switch which will run rates above 100 Mb/s including Rogers Speedboost

     which you can see running on a speedtest.

4.  That the switch will cover the number of rooms that you have to service.  The next size switch will be a 16 port

     I believe.  As you move up in switch size, you will probably see higher packet switching rates as well within

     the switch, which helps keep the data rates up when a number of wired devices are running.

 

There are other manufacturers on the market as well, with the same or very similer capability.



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 14

Re: Slow Speeds With Ignite100


@Datalink wrote:

With the modem relocated upstairs, it may be easier to keep an eye on it and determine if and when anything is going wrong.  I've found that with the CGN3ACSMR and now the CGNM-3552, that's a rare occurrence, but its handy to have both on hand for test purposes.

 

For the switch, the current version of my switch is a D-Link DGS-1008G.

 

http://ca.dlink.com/products/connect/8-port-gigabit-desktop-switch/

 

Just have to ensure that:

 

1.  what you buy is an unmanaged switch if you want plug and play capability;

2.  that it has gigabit ports; and 

3.  that the switch itself is a gigabit switch which will run rates above 100 Mb/s including Rogers Speedboost

     which you can see running on a speedtest.

4.  That the switch will cover the number of rooms that you have to service.  The next size switch will be a 16 port

     I believe.  As you move up in switch size, you will probably see higher packet switching rates as well within

     the switch, which helps keep the data rates up when a number of wired devices are running.

 

There are other manufacturers on the market as well, with the same or very similer capability.


I currently own an 8 port Trendnet Giga switch. It should do the job nicely.

 

Thanks

-clammydog
I'm NOT a Rogers employee, my comments are my own.
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Re: Slow Speeds With Ignite100

My 100 mbs Rogers ignite gives me consistent speed tests in the 135 Mbps range on my desktop. This is an Ethernet connection. The wireless gives me about 25 to 30 Mbps. on my Compaq cs700. Same slow speed on my iPad 2. I understand that wireless is slower but when I plug the Ethernet cable from the desktop into the cs 700 I get the same 25 to 30 mbs speed. I am using the Rogers rocket modem / wireless router made by Hitron. The Compaq has slow 801g wireless but this should not affect the Ethernet connection. 

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Re: Slow Speeds With Ignite100

Ok.  At least from what i could look up, that laptop (like many cheaper ones) only have a 10/100 network card.
Which means it would only get a theoretical max of 100mbps

usually would be under that somewhat.. but should be not the 25-30 range.

Now how long have you had the modem?
If you just got it, it may not be on the latest firmware, and could take 72 hours for it to be pushed out.
Some of the earlier firmware, had an issue where 10/100 cards would not link properly, and would link only at around those speeds.



I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Re: Slow Speeds With Ignite100

Package Rogers Ignite 100u

Router     Model                     ASUS RT-AC66U
                 Firmware Version 3.0.0.4.376_3754

                 4 Gigabit LAN Ports

Modem Model                       CGNM-3552
                Hardware Version 1A
                Software Version   4.5.8.19

When connecting computer directly to modem, able to get the 100 Mbps download speeds.  If then connect computer through router, get somewhere from 30 - 50 Mbps.  Results using Speedtest and nothing else connected/running.

Can you please suggest what router settings might fix this?

 

Thanks