Should I bridge?

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I've Been Around
Posts: 1

Should I bridge?

Hello All,

 

I've been reading the various posts on bridging, etc.  I've got a couple questions...

 

I used to be on a hybrid plan, and had a bad router at that time... bought the ASUS RT-AC68U, and loved it!  But my plan was old and I was always paying for overage.  This made me switch to the Ignite 60, and I got the Rogers Advanced WIreless router.  Foolish me... I thought I had unneccessary hardware now, and since the ASUS was only a week or so old, I returned it.   The Rogers router is very slow to manage.  Wireless coverage at home is decent.. more reliable that the router I had replaced (not the asus.. the one that the asus replaced).  Speed is for the most part good too.

 

I know I don't absolutely need to bridge, but what would bridging give me, other than a better ability to manage my wireless?  And I do miss some of the features I had with the ASUS.  I'd buy it again without any hesitation if I knew that my overall speed and management would improve.

 

Also, wouldn't bridging cause a bottleneck in this case?  You are taking away the switching ability of the Rogers Router, and putting all traffic through a single port.   

 

 

 

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Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 13,871

Re: Should I bridge?

No, it really is not different of a bottleneck with the asus, than with the rogers modem.

 

The wireless/wired router part of the CGN3.. has gigabit network ports.. (so 1000mbps) and with the wireless N (up to 300mbps?).  Your internet is only 60mbps.  So its max potential for going OUT is still limited by the speed out to the rogers network. 
Adding your own router in.. really wont change much.  Your going to have a gigabit link between the rogers modem and your router.  The rogers modem them really is doint NO routing at that point.. its just passing the information along as fast as its able to... which again comes to the bottleneck of the max speed your internet is.

 

As for advantages with bridging:
- Better interface as you mentioned.  While generally the CGN3 (advanced modem) interface WORKS.. its slow.. clunky, some pages take forever to load due to bad design of having to laod tables before you can change tabs, etc.

- More options.  Often routers like the asus, will allow for some other extra options that the CGN3 doesnt have in terms of filtering, etc.
- Port forwarding - if this is in use.. the CGN3 only has limited space (9) vs things like the asus have much much more.

- Latency - Many people have found, with the CGN3 in gateway mode.. that there is a slight jump of like 15ms ocassionaly to the gateway.  Not huge.. but enough for some hardcore gamers to notice it, etc.  Bridging, this delay does not appear to exist (so likely its a failing of the ROUTER portion)

- Wireless quality/range.  All in all, the Asus will have better range/distance than the CGN3.  As well, the quality of the wireless will be better.  (the CGN3 seems to not handle different devices type at the same time.. if you have a slower N and a faster N card that connects.. it will lower itself to the lower for ALL connections)



Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 928

Re: Should I bridge?


BB2001 wrote:I used to be on a hybrid plan, and had a bad router at that time... bought the ASUS RT-AC68U, and loved it!  But my plan was old and I was always paying for overage.  This made me switch to the Ignite 60, and I got the Rogers Advanced WIreless router.  Foolish me... I thought I had unneccessary hardware now, and since the ASUS was only a week or so old, I returned it.  

 

 


Ahhh yes, that mistake. I made that mistake once too, for my parents' account, when they moved from DOCSIS 2 to DOCSIS 3. I thought that the CGN2's built in router/wireless would be more than good enough for a couple in their 60s with, at the time, almost all 2.4GHz-only devices. I was ridiculously wrong. Their old Linksys came back out of the closet within a day or two, and it eventually got replaced by an RT-AC68U that I consider the best piece of consumer-grade networking equipment I've ever touched.

 

Gdkitty already gave you essentially the answer, but fundamentally, to me, the superiority of a good router (and a good router costs real money, like $200) comes down to two things:

1) software quality, i.e. bugs in the NAT, weird issues requiring a reboot, etc.

2) wireless range/performance. There is a BIG difference between the wireless performance of a high-end router with external antennas and... just about everything else.