Router and Modem Questions

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I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Router and Modem Questions

OK - I am a techno idiot, so I'm hoping you can explain the part about the interference if its in an area crowded with other 2.4ghz signals.   Where would this 'crowding" be coming from.  When I first moved into the home I had set up the modem in the bedroom that was being used as an office, connected to the cable in that room.  But I eventually lost all contact with the wifi world leading to a visit from the Rogers technician.  He said A). the cable in the room was the original 1970'something stuff and not cut out for the computer age and B). that the room was too fai away from the living room where the laptop spends most of its time.  So I moved it to a central area in the house right next to the wall where the cable comes in, which the Rogers guy said was more modern.  Still had disconnection issues so got the router (d-linx) and that solved it until recently.  I don't have any new equipment or devices.   It doesn't seem to matter how far we are away from the modem when the disconnections occur, and all the devices lose their connections at the same time.  During the day I have my work laptop hooked up to the wifi, and my personal laptop is always hooked up.  I have a wireless printer, one cell phone with a data plan and a child's cell phone without a data, and an ipad that only see's occasional use.    So is it these devices that are "crowding" the wifi?   Thanks

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Re: Router and Modem Questions

your devices aren't crowding the wifi, it's the other house's near you that are. Every Router needs to broadcast the signal, so the more Routers near you, the more crowded it becomes. Unfortunately there isn't anything you can do about that, unless you live in a rural area far away from neighbours.



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Re: Router and Modem Questions

@ssnswan, as @gp-se has indicated, the problem is all of the other wifi modems and routers that are running nearby.  With only 11 channels available in the 2.4 Ghz band, in a typical neighborhood, that means that there are multiple modems and routers operating on the same channel, and that is across all of the channels.  If you look at the inSSIDer image in the following link, that shows exactly what @gp-se was indicating, and that is all of the other wifi modems and routers that are close enough to interfere with your wifi network.

 

http://communityforums.rogers.com/t5/forums/forumtopicpage/board-id/Getting_connected/message-id/324...

 

In this particular case, the wifi network that is in use is indicated as "Hobo", sitting at -49 dbm.  The nearest overlapping channel is on channel 2, indicated in red.  Thats "AUJLA 007".  Ideally, for the Hobo network to operate without any interference problems, the closest network, in terms of power would be down around -90 to -95 dbm.  With a 40 to 45 dbm separation between your network and the closest overlapping network, in terms of receive power at your laptop, you could expect the wifi network to operate reasonably well. 

 

Now, in this case, Hobo is at -49 dbm, Aujla 007 is at -67 dbm, and further down and also overlapping is Kuldeep at -75 dbm.  The power separation from Hobo to Aujla is only 18 dbm, and from Hobo to Kuldeep is 26 dbm.  In both cases, the other two networks will present interference that will cause issues with the Hobo network.  Either one of those networks might be transmitted from a modem or router from the next door neighbor.  So, presumably the modem or router probably isn't going to move away soon, and neither is the neighbor.  So that means that if you want to use wifi in your own home, you would have to either change channels to one that is less crowded, if that is possible at all, or, decide that its time to move up to the 5 Ghz band, which doesn't carry as far down the road or across the neighborhood, and where you would have an easier time to find an open channel. 

 

In this particular case, inSSIDer is loaded on a single band laptop, and that is the 2.4 Ghz band, so, the right hand display for the 5 Ghz band is blank as the adapter does not support 5 Ghz operation. 

 

This is a pretty good example of crowding and interference in the 2.4 Ghz band.  There are no good solutions there, other than deciding to run the modem in Bridge mode and use a router with external antenna and beam forming capability to improve wifi performance in the home.  The other networks are not going away, so, the choice is to improve the 2.4 Ghz performance, or, move up to the 5 Ghz band, at least to the greatest extent possible.  As time goes on, there are more and more wifi modems and routers put to use and as a result, that crowding in the wifi bands gets worse and worse.  Where one day you had a clear channel to operate on, the next day its gone as the neighbor has brought home a new wifi modem and router and is now competing with you for the same channel, so now his, or her modem or router is interfering with your network.  

 

The wifi adapters have essentially three levels of signal to work thru.

 

a.  background noise that can't be processed, like far away wifi transmissions that are too weak for the wifi adapter to process, and other noise like microwave ovens, cordless phone perhaps and others.

 

b.  background noise that can be processed, such as the wifi networks that belong to your neighbors.  The adapter will understand that there are other networks out there and modify its behavior if necessary to accommodate those networks.

 

c.  Your own network, which can be received and processed (in theory)

 

Noise A does nothing but raise the overall noise floor that the wifi adapter has to work above.  Noise B can directly interfere with your network.  As the level of interference between some other network and your network increases, it causes your network to use more error correction bits per packet of data.  So you lose in terms of data rate as more and more of the bits that travel between the modem and device are used for error correction purposes.  The modem and device change the data encoding type on the fly in order to take into consideration the background noise level.  The higher the background noise level, the more bits will be used for error correction purposes, just to get the data thru to the receiving device and ensure that its correct .  With low noise levels, such as in the country for example, where the nearest neighbor might be a mile or more away, the modem and device will have very low background noise to deal with and as a result, the encoding changes to use the majority of data bits for actual data, with a very small number of bits for error correction.

 

So, that in a nutshell, a rather large nutshell, is the problem with using the 2.4 Ghz band for wifi. 

 

hope this all makes sense.

 

If you would like instructions on downloading and using inSSIDer, they are posted in varous posts, but I can certainly repost them for you.



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Re: Router and Modem Questions

So I ended up trying the Linksys WRT1900ACS and a Asus RT-AC1900P. I found the Asus performed better than the Linksys, however both were similar to the Hitron CGNM 3552. I've decided to Return both and stick to the Hitron. I'm hoping a new firmware will improve WiFi performance, The ACSMR I had before the CGNM 3552 had better WiFi.



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I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Re: Router and Modem Questions

Hitron Router CGNM-3552

 

What is the significance of the GREEN and YELLOW lights (not only the colour but also solid vs flashing) associated with the Ethernet ports located on the backside of the Hitron Router CGNM-3552 ?

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Re: Router and Modem Questions

@UserBK when the connected port LED is flashing Amber, that indicates that the modem port is communicating with the device port at 1 Gb/s and that there is data traffic transmitting back and forth.  A Green LED indicates that the modem port is communicating with the device port at 10/100 Mb/s with data traffic transmitting back and forth. 



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I've Been Here Awhile
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Re: Router and Modem Questions

Thank you for your prompt response RE Datalink.

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Re: Router and Modem Questions

Actually, you're response is misleading.  Rogers has in the past and continues to support the installation of "approved" modems.  The way that the contracts haven been written and, more specifically, the description of the modems available, have consistently shown that this policy of having a "rogers" modem is paramount to false advertising.  Just make sure to copy the fine print on their website, or send my a private message and I'll send you my information.  Now, of course, this was during the good old Motorola Modem Days, and it took a little bit of coaxing... (not coaxe alling).  But in the end Rogers knew, and still knows they're wrong.  If you arrive with a Hitron CGN3 or a Hitron CODA modem, connecting them to service should work perfectly fine.   You just need to be persistent.   And b.t.w. : There are plenty of 3rd Tiers Internet Providers that offer cable internet through "Rogers'" cable system.  They use their own modems with their own logos.  If they continue to give you a hard time with residential service, you can always, and quite easily switch over to Rogers business side.  You also get the Ridiculously Stupendously Amazing ability to make sure you're service is NOT bundled, which makes things much much much MUCH more simpler and straight forward when it comes to discounts and when you're shopping around, or when you've gotten tired of watching cable TV or using their Home Phone and want to cancel.  In fact, I've gone to Rogers website with IE vs Chrome vs Edge, and the packages and the prices have someone changed between internet browsers (and that's even after clearing my cache and refreshing the webpages)

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Re: Router and Modem Questions

Yes, 3rd party providers are allowed to have other modems.
But those ones, still have to meet certain requirements ,as they are 'registered' on the rogers network.
(so they just cant pick ANYTHING)

So as long as it falls within THOSE guidelines, of approved modems... should/could they be approved for service?  S
SURE.
But at that point... Outside of the LINE to the house.. rogers would not really support it hardware wise (like using 3rd party routers, etc).  You can use them, but a user could not really expect support on them.
Rogers streamlines their modems they generally use, for this very reason.

Same would go for any other sort of rogers services.  Ignite a prime example.
Or any of the other advertised settings/features.


I am not saying that they shouldnt be allowed.  It should possibly be a option for select users.  (more advanced/experienced users)

But for MOST users.. its plug and go.  They dont know nor necessarily want to do all the extra work to get it going.  For the average user, its not worth the hassle.