Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware

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I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware

@kind_grapewrote:

Hello champs, I just got my rogers cable internet and I am interested in the Moca 2.0 coax/ethernet set up, as all I have is coax connector in each room, so might as well thinking to use them.

 

I tried to research more on this forum and it seems it was not as trivial as it appears. So please forgive me if I was a noob in this case, here is a few of my questions I have. One of the online guide said as long as you have 2 actiontec adapters it will work 

This guy appears to be using rogers internet and all he did was install 2 moca adapters on each end..

 

https://wegotserved.com/2015/08/04/how-to-improve-your-network-speeds-with-moca-adapters/

 

1) Since the moca capability was enable in the recent firmware, do I still need to buy one of the actiontec moca 2.0 adapter before the modem? Or the LAN ports behind the CODA 4582 modem can act as one already?

 

2) my current set up of internet is like this

Cable from street -> splitter -> main coax in the first floor -> coda 4582 -> tplink archer c7 

                                                                                                      |_> split -> coax in the second floor study (want to ethernet)

                                                                                                                 |_>coax in the family room (want to ethernet)

Just wanted to know where should I put my Moca PoE filter? Realized it was mentioned a few times here already. I am thinking either before the first splitter or before the coda 4582

 

Hopefully guru like @Datalink and @viciouslancer would be able to advise here.

 

Ps only rogers internet in play here

 

 


I have a similar set up.  Moca adapters + cable internet.

 

You will need the following set up:

 

Cabling setup

cable from street --> MOCA POE filter --> 3-way MOCA 5Mhz to 1675Mhz splitter --> coax cable to the rest of your house.   (to do this, you will need a cabling lock terminator tool to unlock and open the Rogers box outside your house)

 

Please note your house coax cabling should be RG6 and not RG59 if you want full speed bonded MOCA 2 speeds.  You should be able to read RG6 on the cable jacket.

 

Modem setup

wall coax port --> actiontec adapter Coax in port

actiontec adapter TV/STB out port --> CODA modem coax port

actiontec adapter ethernet port --> to your TPlink router LAN ports 

CODA modem ethernet port --> to your TPlink router WAN port

 

Rest of house (up to 16 of Actiontech moca adapters)

wall coax port --> actiontec adapter Coax in port

actiontec adapter ethernet port  --> to your other ethernet devices  (PCs, printers, laptops, etc).

 

FYI, I got my Holland Electronics MOCA POE filter from Amazon.com.  It's cheaper there even with shipping.  You can probably get your Holland Electronics MOCA splitter there too.

I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware

Mad thanks @jimmyzaas the explanation makes sense, now the picture is more clear to me now. I think these two are the additional filters and splinters to buy

https://www.amazon.com/Filter-MoCA-Cable-Coaxial-Networking/dp/B00DC8IEE6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=152...

 

https://www.amazon.com/Holland-Electronics-GHS-2Pro-M-Splitter-5-1675Mhz/dp/B00OTO99VY/ref=pd_bxgy_2...

 

And the modem set up makes sense too, but in this case the rogers modem simply provides internet access and doesnt do much of the routing and moca conversion. I was hoping with the moca firmware update, the actiontect adapter and the tplink archer c7 can be getting rid of near the modem Smiley Sad

 

But regardless I will try to set up and try my luck!  

I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware


@kind_grapewrote:

Mad thanks @jimmyzaas the explanation makes sense, now the picture is more clear to me now. I think these two are the additional filters and splinters to buy

https://www.amazon.com/Filter-MoCA-Cable-Coaxial-Networking/dp/B00DC8IEE6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=152...

 

https://www.amazon.com/Holland-Electronics-GHS-2Pro-M-Splitter-5-1675Mhz/dp/B00OTO99VY/ref=pd_bxgy_2...

 

And the modem set up makes sense too, but in this case the rogers modem simply provides internet access and doesnt do much of the routing and moca conversion. I was hoping with the moca firmware update, the actiontect adapter and the tplink archer c7 can be getting rid of near the modem Smiley Sad

 

But regardless I will try to set up and try my luck!  


No problem my friend.  I also had to dig around for information when I was planning it out.  That is the exact same filter I got.  Splitter looks good too.   Very high quality.  Almost a shame to have to use them outside Smiley Happy

 

Yea it's too bad.  I don't see any option to enable Moca in the CODA modem, or you could have saved $100 for not buying an extra Moca adapter.  I know what you mean.. it gets messy near that modem with all the extra coax and ethernet wiring.

I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware

I could see moca settings under my coda modem admin page. I believe it might be added in firmware version later than .30 

I am currently running the production firmware 2.0.10.33T3, moca setting is under basic settings tab, in which it seems it could be enabled. 

Capture.PNG

Now that you have your setup complete maybe you could try that and see if the coda modem can act as one adapter on its own lol.

 

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,061

Re: Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware

@kind_grape@jimmyzaas, I'd like to point out a few items in this discussion.

 

1.  There might not be any need for the tool to unlock the external cable box if the cable comes into the home and is split to provide services to the existing cable system.  Since the cable termination and splitter are internal, there would be no reason to unlock the external cable box.  If on the other hand, all of the cabling runs external to the home before entering specific rooms, then yes, the unlock tool would be required. 

 

2.  @kind_grape, you need to consider how many cable runs you want to connect with an Actiontec adapter.  The Holland splitter that was indicated is for three cables.  If you have three cables that will be connected that's fine.  If you only two cables, then you should be using a two port splitter as shown in the Amazon listings:

 

https://www.amazon.com/Holland-Electronics/b/ref=w_bl_hsx_s_ce_web_3030901011?ie=UTF8&node=303090101...

 

If you need more than three cables connected, then you should have a look at the Holland site to determine whats available.  

 

http://www.hollandelectronics.com/catalog/catalog.php?product_id=catv-moca-splitter

 

PDF spec sheet link for MoCA 2.0 splitters:

 

http://www.hollandelectronics.com/catalog/upload_file/GHS-PRO-M.pdf

 

Note that when you install a splitter, that splitter drops the signal power at each outgoing port.  In the case of the two port splitter, the drop is equal.  In the case of indicated three port splitter, one port has a -3.5 dB drop, the other two drop by -7 dB.  Each splitter in the spec sheet is unique, and what you want to do is match the number of splitter output ports to the number of cable runs you want to have in use, so that you minimize the signal drop at the outgoing ports.  In each case, what you want to do is use the port with the least amount of signal drop for the internet cable run.  Depending on what splitter you eventually install, you could run into issues if the signal drop to the internet modem it too much.  That would depend on your original cable signal level where it enters the home.  

 

Assuming for example that you want to use two cable runs, this is what the installation would look like:

 

Incoming cable ---> MoCA POE filter ---> MoCA Splitter port 1 ---> cable run ---> Actiontec Adapter 1---> cable run ---> modem

                                                                       MoCA Splitter port 2 ---> cable run ---> Actiontec Adapter 2

 

For the ethernet connections it would look like the following:

 

Modem or Router ethernet port --->  Actiontec Adapter 1 ethernet port

 

Device ethernet port ---> Actiontec Adapter 2 ethernet port

 

There is a MoCA control panel in the modem, located in BASIC .... MoCA

 

One key point to MoCA output for the modem itself is that its locked into the MoCA frequency band D high.  Have a look at the frequency bands as indicated in page 7 of 34 in the MoCA 2.0 Specification:

 

http://www.mocalliance.org/MoCA2/specification/MoCA_2_Device_RF_Characteristics-150406d.pdf

 

MoCA 2.0 introduced an extended D Band which now goes up to 1675 Mhz.  Rogers uses D Low for the Nextbox Whole Home PVR system, and as a result the modem is locked into using D High for MoCA operations.  For those customers who are actually using the Whole Home PVR system, thats a sensible way to use the available frequencies.  For those customers who don't have or use the Whole Home PVR system, that limits the througput that they could actually realize using the MoCA adapters.  So, for your specific case, you're better off using a pair of Actiontec Adapters which I believe should allow you to force the use of the entire D Band.  The Actiontec Quick Start Guide and User Manual for the  ECB6250 are completely useless as they don't show the Configuration Control Panel.  You will have to get to this panel to turn on the privacy settings and enter the password to keep the MoCA data exchange private.  At the same time, look for the Bandwidth settings.  You should hopefully be able to select the entire D Band.  

 

Ok, that should do it for now, no doubt I'll think of other items along the way.

 

Edit:  When you have the Actiontec adapters on hand, connect them in the following fashion and after configuring them to use the entire D band if possible, run a speed test thru them to determine what the results are. 

 

 

Incoming cable ---> MoCA POE filter ---> MoCA Splitter port 1 ---> cable run ---> Actiontec Adapter 1---> cable run ---> Actiontec Adapter 2 ---> modem

 

modem / router ethernet port ---> Actiontec Adapter 2 ethernet port

 

Test Device ethernet port ---> Actiontec Adapter 1 ethernet port

 

This would represent the best possible result as you would have them set up back to back, so to speak.  So, no splitter, no long cable runs.  When you have them set up in the desire locations, run another speedtest to determine what the penalty might be with the splitter and long cable runs in use.  For 500 Mb/s and gig service, use the www.speedtest.net Toronto Rogers or Montreal Rogers servers.  

 

Edit 2.  Is there any chance that you have two RG-6 cable runs installed?  If so, you could use one run for the internet modem, and the other cable runs for an internal cable connected internet.  You should be able to determine that by looking behind the wallplate that contains the current cable ports to see if in fact there was another cable available.  Sometimes in cable installations, there will be two RG-6 runs installed, one with a white external cover and one with a black external cover.  Their equivalent in terms of their tech specs just a different external colour.  If you had that available, one system can be used for an internet network which would have full use of the bandwidth, without any interference from the Rogers Cable frequencies.   In this case you wouldn't use the MoCA POE filter as this system wouldn't be connected to the external cable feed.  You would only need the splitter to connect the cables to one another. 

 

 



I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware

@Datalink@kind_grape

 

That's some great info.  I wish I had that when I rolled out mine.  It should be noted that if a 2 way splitter is required, one is already included with the Actiontec ECB6200 kit.  Based on the original request, he has three locations that require moca, one at the router, and two in other rooms.  That's why I suggested a 3 way splitter.  

 

I'm still on an older firmware 2.0.10.28T2 Smiley Sad.  I don't see the moca page.

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Posts: 6,061

Re: Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware

Would you happen to know if the Actiontec adapter has the following selections available for the Bandwidth setting:

 

1.  D

2.  Extended D

3.  D - Low

4.  D - High

 

There may be other choices as well.  Extended D would be appropriate if you didn't run the Whole Home PVR.  D - High would be appropriate if you were running the Whole Home PVR. 



I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware

@Datalink Great write up man, thanks. Yea I wanted to have 2 more places have access to ethernet, one at home office and another one at the TV/media bench. I was wondering from your experience,  what would be the speed disadvantage for using the moca on CODA modem (with only D band high) vs. using the the actiontec adapter with the modem (whole band)?  At the end of the day if the drop of speed is acceptable, without too much devices clustering at one one place would be worth considering too lol

But regardless I will need to start buying those devices and test it out, won't know for sure until then.

I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware


@Datalinkwrote:

Would you happen to know if the Actiontec adapter has the following selections available for the Bandwidth setting:

 

1.  D

2.  Extended D

3.  D - Low

4.  D - High

 

There may be other choices as well.  Extended D would be appropriate if you didn't run the Whole Home PVR.  D - High would be appropriate if you were running the Whole Home PVR. 


Here you go sir:

 

Capture.PNG

 

@Found from Actiontec ECB6200's config page @ 192.168.144.30

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,061

Re: Rogers Hitron CODA-4582 Hardware

@kind_grape I don't run MoCA adapters as our home is wired with Structured Wiring, which is cable, ethernet and telephone all in one bundle.  Having the ethernet cabling available makes this a much simpler task.  

 

Its hard to determine what the effect would be using the modem versus the Actiontec adapters. From the 4582 spec sheet comes the following:

 

MoCA 2.0 Reception / Transmitter-Modulation

• Demodulation/ Modulation: BPSK, QPSK, 8QAM, 16QAM, 32QAM, 64QAM, 128QAM, 256QAM, 512QAM, 1024QAM
• PHY data rate: 700Mbps (baseline Mode) / 1400Mbps (bonding channel)
• Throughput: 400+Mbps (baseline Mode) / 500+Mbps (turbo mode, point to point) / 800Mbps (bonding channel)
• Frequency range: 1125-1675MHz
• Channel bandwidth: 100MHz (baseline mode) / 225MHz (bonding channel)

 

With the D-High restriction in place I don't know if the modem will run the MoCA channel in Baseline mode or bonding channel mode.  So at the end of the day you could see 400 or 800 Mb/s, as a guess.  That will also depend on the signal drops from the splitter and the cabling itself.  One thing that you should do is look at the cable jacketing for an RG-6 or RG-59 marking.  RG-6 is what you want, RG-59 is what you might have if the house is old enough.  RG-59 has a 1 dB higher loss number compared to RG-6 when you look at the 1100 to 1650 Mhz range.  So, not much more, but, everything counts when you're trying to get this to work.  

 

Since you have to buy at least two of these, you could run an experiment.  Using the provided two port splitter that apparently arrives with the adapters, install the POE filter and the two port adapter, and leave the modem cable run as is.  Then install one adapter at the far end of the other connected cable run.  Configure the modem to run MoCA and run a speedtest at the far end.  You might have to configure the adapter to run D-High to match the modem's output.  I don't know if its automatic or if you have to do that yourself.  With everything up and running, run a speedtest using the www.speedtest.net Toronto Rogers or Montreal Rogers servers.  

 

Then, disable the modem's MoCA and install the second adapter at the modem end of the cable.  Configure the adapters to use the entire Extended D band and run the same speedtest.  The results might be rather interesting.  The one thing that is missing would be the second cable leg and any loading effects it might have on MoCA operations.  You might get a hint of that if the far end speedtests turn out to be less than stellar.  If so, running other cable runs via the MoCA are bound to have some further negative influence on the MoCA data rates.  It all depends on what happens to be running via MoCA.  

 

So, the test setup would look like the following:  

 

Test 1:  

 

Incoming cable ---> MoCA POE filter ---> MoCA Splitter port 1 ---> cable run ---> modem (MoCA enabled)

                                                                           MoCA Splitter port 2 ---> cable run ---> Actiontec Adapter 2

 

Test 2:

 

Incoming cable ---> MoCA POE filter ---> MoCA Splitter port 1 ---> cable run ---> Actiontec Adapter 1---> cable run ---> modem (MoCA disabled)

                                                                       MoCA Splitter port 2 ---> cable run ---> Actiontec Adapter 2

 

Depending on your results, you would know if its worth buying another adapter or not.  It all depends on the numbers.