Managed hubs/switches

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I'm a Senior Advisor
Posts: 2,154

Re: Managed hubs/switches

The switch in the recommendation is around 300 and a bit depending upon where you order it.

The switches I mentioned I had used were from 10 years ago - prices have dropped a lot and small office equipment is affordable for those who want to have multiple connections and management - example - you can dedicate VOIP if you use it so you don't have packet loss to say someone watching a streamed video or gaming, or dedicate priority to gaming, etc.  Even can set up a virtual private network internally for say two computers that are always communicating to each other and you don't want them impacting the rest of the network and visa versa.  

 

I found managed switches in the last place I would have thought - Walmart.ca search managed switches - there is a 16 port dlink managed switch for under 150.00

 

TP link 24 port for 322.  Pop into a local computer shop that does networking, talk about your needs and then do some searching for exactly what you are after and pricing.  Looks like there is a wide range of pricing and features.

But the Uni systems from what I have read and the recommendation of the earlier poster seem pretty solid and reasonably priced in the range you are hoping for.

 

Happy hunting.

 

Out of curiousity 24 devices in a home, you running a small server farm or have a huge number of people living within a very large house? No answer required. Smiley Surprised

 

Bruce

 

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 11

Re: Managed hubs/switches

Thanks Bruce.  Did i say 24?  We are two and have at this point 1 Intel 4960X Tower I assembled and a Surface Pro 3 (512GB) for travel or elsewhere in the house and yard.  She has a new Intel NUC system i put together and her old Toshiba Qosmio X70 which is passing on soon.  As well there is a QNAP NAS to which we backup, an HP OfficeJet 8710 network-attached.  Then we have the Samsung Smart TV with a Rogers Cable box (it has an RJ45 port in back!!!??) and a DVD/BlueRay player with it's own network RJ45 plug.  Add to this the RING Doorbell (wonderful toy). Lastly there is our security system which has both telephone and Internet connections - Rogers usually only crashes one at a time <G>. The house is fully wired and wirelessed for these device and for guests so the 16-port Cisco has 8 used.  I am sure that with newer appliances coming down the road, more connections may be needed.  I have had experiences with guests where my monthly bandwidth cap (200GB) was exceed - the two of us usually max out at 30GB a month, so God only knows what my guests were up to.  I am resisting these new boxes that chat with you and dig up information at the drop of the question, I am betting they too will be wonderful bandwidth hogs.  So yes, i want to know who is using what when and how and the only way i currently see doing this is replacing my current dumb switch with one that will gather, save and report usage by device of the Internet connection.  I will look into your suggestions.  Thank you ever so much.

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I'm a Senior Advisor
Posts: 2,154

Re: Managed hubs/switches

Neat, nice use of Internet in the home.  I was thinking 24 only because you mentioned 24 switch - my bad - jumped to a conclusion.

 

And I agree with you, it seems that every time I turn around, I have another app wanting to collect data, apps that update constantly, and then you have Windows 10 that does full OS updates once every six months as it operates as a service now, not an OS you buy and decide when you wish to update - I keep waiting for them to come along and start charging a subscription too.

 

So, like you, I like to know what is going over my Internet, in particular when I see data flow that I don't understand or expect.  In particular since I don't go the unlimited bandwidth appproach with Rogers because I don't need all the data they offer to get it.  I have run on 60 with 200 GB for about 3 years now and 30 before that with all of 60 per month.

 

So I hear your concern to know what uses what - anecdotal story - in a corporate setting, we were plugging along with about40% bandwidth usage in a month, knowing that we would be adding over the next few years to increase our demand, and suddenly, we were hitting 89%.  Fortunately, we had a Firebox VPN that also served as a managed switch for monitoring both internal and external traffic as we had external VPN clients attaching - we learned that a a new parent in the organization had logged into a "nanny cam" for the day care (they were using 45% bandwidth per day).  We were understanding, we set times of the day they could look (smart phones didn't exist then), but without the monitoring tools, we would never have known was it a virus, a trogan, a hijack, (we had some of those too - those were the days, lots of firefighting), and the tools allowed us to know what was going on.  Most of these tools you will find if you go that route, will also send an alert of what you decide to be monitored more closely.

 

In the corporation, it also guides decisions on the best management of bandwidth, and in our own homes, as our demands grow, adding more data is not always the most appropriate answer.

 

I actually have 1 16 port, and 3 8 port switches in a box, left over from my consulting days, I still use the 8 port as I have 8 ethernet jacks in the house, and before I went WI FI, they were all in use. I would love to put a full NAS in place, and the USB ports on the Rogers modem does not function for higher end use, just have to set it up. I have a 3015 Multipurpose printer in place running from a HP print server connected to Ethernet (the thing is a tank, 15 years old and still ticking, although does need rollers replaced and cleaning), A Blue Ray Player with Netflix and other OTT apps in it using an RJ45, and a couple of older desktops, that function as my at home NAS backups, I so see exactly where you are coming from - the house is wired cat5e, so comes close to GB, and most the older stuff is on 100 Mbs, so not an issue given I only have 75Mbx coming in anyway.

 

Been fun using that side of my brain again - thanks for jogging it - retired 15 years now, then went on to be a teacher, now fully retired on a disability pension, but the brain still works.

 

Journey on.

 

Bruce

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 11

Re: Managed hubs/switches

Oh, i forgot the two iPads we have.  So we are two with many LAN-attached (wired and wireless) devices.  I shudder to think of a household full of kids of various ages and competencies - scary thoughts!!!  Mine own come to visit occasionally with his laptop, iPad and iPhone, so there is another three devices!

 

The household LAN industry is missing the boat here!  Household LANs also need managing - what bandwidth usage, by what device, with what "software tool" accessing the Internet.  That's a saleable product provided the price point is right., under $500.00, and the tools to use it are very user-friendly - not all Dads are technical gurus, nor need they be.

 

I have been retired some 25 years now.  I started a business here in Ottawa providing product sales, service and user support in a very price-competitive market.  Had to sell out to a Toronto shop because i couldn't finance the growth (40% annually).  But my old clients still come back for advice, product (occasionally), service and support - much of it very opinionated.  I am facing a critical decision at this time - Apple iPhone X for $2,000 or HP Elite X3 for $1,000.  Any thoughts there?