Losing internet connection CGN3ACSMR

Need Help?

That's what we're here for! The goal of the Rogers Community is to help you find answers on everything Rogers. Can't find what you're looking for? Just ask!
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply
Attheend
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Losing internet connection CGN3ACSMR

Forgive me for what seems to be a repost of a problem well documented on here and across the internet. I have the Rogers 100u service and with it came the HiTron CGN3ACSMR Modem. 

Until recently I have had zero issues with my service but recently I've been having issues sustaining an internet connection in my house - forgive me I'm not the most tech-savy when it comes to modems etc. 

I'll be surfing the web on either a smartphone or my PC and suddenly without warning my device will inform me that I have lost internet connection. I'm still connected to my modem but no internet. I've called Rogers twice now regarding the matter and they have stated that the signal to my house etc. is excellent however as many as 14 times an hour I will lose internet connection. 

I've reset my router, changed my settings to what Rogers has suggested, tried setting the Channels to a constant after scanning wifi channels and selecting the least populated, and quite frankly I'm at the end of my limits. 

Can anyone help? 

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,367

Re: Losing internet connection CGN3ACSMR

@Attheend, is this observed on an ethernet or wifi connection?



Attheend
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Losing internet connection CGN3ACSMR

My apologies this is over a wifi connection using a Galaxy S6, Galaxy S6 Egde, and my personal PC.

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,367

Re: Losing internet connection CGN3ACSMR

Ok, can you delete your last post as it has your modem MAC address in it.  I can see that you're connected to a Casa Systems Cable Modem Termination System, which is presenting problems that you may have previously read about.  So, in the instructions below is a firmware version check.  There is a newer trial version (v4.5.8.22) out that might just revolve your problems.  If you have a CGN3ACSMR with a firmware verison below 4.5.8.21, that will be part of the problem.  The Casa CMTS has recently replaced the Cisco CMTS and unexpected compatibility issues between the new CMTS and Hitron modems has arisen which Rogers, Casa Systems and Hitron are working on.  

 

Just to rule out any cable signal issues, can you start a web browser and type in 192.168.0.1 in the address bar, no www or http, just the numbers.  That will take you to the log in page.  Please log into the modem and on the first page that comes up have a look at the Software Version that is indicated.  

 

1.  Please let me know that version indicates.  Its actually the firmware version, but shown as the software version. 

 

2.  Then navigate to the STATUS .... DOCSIS WAN page, copy the downstream and upstream tables and paste those tables into a post.  The copy and paste process will paste in the text contents of the tables, so you don't have to use a screen capture to post an image.  Pasting in the text contents will keep this a little simpler.  

 

3.  Please have a look at the product sticker at the back of the modem and confirm for me that you have a CNG3ACSMR.  There are four CGN3 series modems, CGN3, CGN3ACR, CGN3ACM(?), and CGN3ACSMR.

 

4.  For the wifi, please give the following instructions a go. The Hitron modems are not stellar wifi performers to begin with, so, considering this is a recent problem, my thoughts are either a cable signal issue, or, perhaps one of your neighbors has set up a new modem or router, and now you're competing for the same wifi channels. Are you using a 2.4 or 5 Ghz wifi network?

 

5.  Ok, try this. Load inSSIDer on your laptop, which is a wifi monitoring application.  When loaded on a dual band laptop, inSSIDer will monitor both 2.4 and 5 Ghz networks that can be detected by your laptop.  Have a look to see what you're competing with in both bands. In a suburban area, the 2.4 Ghz band is usually pretty crowded and tough to work in. Usually the 5 Ghz band is less crowded and easier to find a clear channel.  After you have a look at the display, you might be able to determine if there are any 2.4 or 5 Ghz channels that are not in use, or offer less interference.  Thats usually pretty tough with 2.4. Ghz channels as the only channels that don't overlap with each other is 1, 6, and 11.  As a result, everyone tries to use those channels.  The program link below is for the last freebie version. It doesn't display the 802.11ac networks in use in the 5 Ghz band.  There is a newer licenced version out now that will handle 802.11ac networks, and which will work on a 802.11n laptop. The new version will read the broadcast management frames and display the 802.11ac networks that are running in the 5 Ghz band.  If you use 5 Ghz networks, its worth the $20 U.S. to buy, so that you can see all of the 5 Ghz networks that are in use.

 

http://www.techspot.com/downloads/5936-inssider.html

 

What you want to see on the graphical display is that your network is the highest network shown, which indicates that it has the highest received power of all the received networks.  Generally you want somewhere in the neighborhood of 40 to 45 dBmW separation between your network and any other network that is on the same or overlapping channel.  So, while your network should be the tallest on the display, everything else should be well below yours. The scale on the display has 0 dBmW at the top, and it then descends from there.  When the power level separation between networks decreases, you end up with interference and possibly with problems maintaining a wifi network.  Your only option is to change to a channel with less overlap from the competition.  By looking at that display you might conclude that the 2.4 Ghz band is hopeless and that its time to move up to the 5 Ghz band, if you can.  If you have devices already running in the 5 Ghz band, change your operating channel to 149 or higher.  If you can switch to any of those channels, do so, as the output power for those channels is higher, resulting in better signal levels, signal to noise ratios and data rates.

 

So, with inSSIDer loaded on your laptop, take a walk around your home.  Take a look at the display when you're close to the modem, and where you normally use your laptop.  Essentially, you're doing a site survey. It takes about three to four minutes for the display to settle out when you move around and stop in a location somewhere.  You should see some differences in the received network power levels as you move around your home, both for your own network, and those of your neighbors.  Perhaps one of your neighbors has bought a new modem or router and is competing for the same channels that you are using.  If so, inSSIDer will show that.

 

What you can do is take a screenshot of the inSSIDer display, dump it into something like Microsoft paint and wipe out your MAC address from the text and display area and then save it.  Insert it into a post so I can have a look at it if you need help with the interpretation.  With the info provided by the inSSIDer display it will be easier to determine what the problem might be.

 



Attheend
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Losing internet connection CGN3ACSMR

  1. Firmware is: 4.5.8.21

 

  1.  

Downstream Overview

Port ID

Frequency (MHz)

Modulation

Signal strength (dBmV)

Channel ID

Signal noise ratio (dB)

1

615000000

256QAM

8.500

35

38.605

2

363000000

256QAM

5.500

10

38.605

3

369000000

256QAM

5.900

11

38.605

4

375000000

256QAM

5.800

12

38.605

5

381000000

256QAM

5.900

13

38.605

6

387000000

256QAM

5.900

14

38.983

7

393000000

256QAM

6.300

15

38.983

8

399000000

256QAM

6.400

16

38.605

9

405000000

256QAM

6.500

17

38.605

10

411000000

256QAM

6.500

18

38.605

11

417000000

256QAM

6.800

19

38.983

12

423000000

256QAM

6.800

20

38.605

13

429000000

256QAM

7.300

21

38.605

14

435000000

256QAM

7.300

22

38.605

15

441000000

256QAM

7.100

23

38.605

16

447000000

256QAM

7.100

24

38.605

17

555000000

256QAM

7.400

25

38.605

18

561000000

256QAM

7.300

26

38.605

19

567000000

256QAM

7.300

27

38.605

20

573000000

256QAM

7.300

28

38.983

21

603000000

256QAM

8.200

33

38.983

22

609000000

256QAM

8.500

34

38.983

23

357000000

256QAM

5.400

9

38.983

24

621000000

256QAM

8.500

36

38.983

Upstream Overview

Port ID

Frequency (MHz)

Modulation

Signal strength (dBmV)

Channel ID

BandWidth

1

23700000

ATDMA - 64QAM

36.750

2

6400000

2

30596000

ATDMA - 64QAM

36.500

1

6400000

 

  1.  The modem is in fact the CGN3ACSMR.

 

4/5.  Using both a 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz connection – using a WiFi analyzer discovered most of my neighbours are using channels 1- 3 and 9+ for 2.4Ghz. Currently have my channel set to 5 to avoid any overlap. For 5Ghz I have the only 5Ghz service and it is 42-44. Hopefully this makes sense.

 

Here is an inSSIDer screen capture:

WiFi.png

 

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,367

Re: Losing internet connection CGN3ACSMR

@Attheend,

 

1. With a CGN3ACSMR loaded with 4.5.8.21 you shouldn't have any problems other than high ping times due to the Casa CMTS that the modem is connected with.  Thats an engineering issue that is under investigation at the present time. Tech support can't help with that issue.  If you have Chromecast devices, then you should request 4.5.8.22.

 

2. Your downstream signal levels are higher than I would like to see, but, they are within spec, so, for an ethernet connected device, I would expect you to see the data rates that your internet plan calls for and slightly above. The signal to noise ratios on the downstream are good.  The upstream could be a problem.  There should be three upstream channels.  Did the last channel not copy or paste in with the rest?  If in fact you do only have two upstream channels the next step is to call tech support and ask the CSR to run a signal check on the modem. Indicate to the CSR that you only have two upstream channels instead and three, and as a result, the signal check should fail automatically.  That in turn will lead to a tech visit at your convenience.  Please let me know if you only have two upstream channels.  Looking at the downstream channels and their high levels, I would think that you might live in an apartment, condo, highrise, etc, as levels such as that are frequently seen from people who live in multi-family dwellings.

 

3. Looking at your inSSIDer image, the numbers of other modems and routers isn't that bad, the problem is the signal levels of those other transmitters.  On the 2.4 Ghz side, there is just no getting away from the interference from those transmitters.  Having said that, if 2.4 Ghz performance is important enough, you might want to consider buying a good router with external antenna and gigabit WAN and LAN ports.  The signal gain performance of the antenna on the Hitron modem actually isn't bad at all compared to router antenna, but, I suspect that having the antenna mounted on the main board of the modem results in less that optimal wifi performance compared to an antenna sitting above the router and away from any shielding and interference from the board components.

 

4. On the 5 Ghz side, it looks like you're on your own.  You should lock the modem to channel 149 or higher and select either 40 or 80 Mhz for the bandwidth.  Channels 149 and above are allowed to run a higher power level, 1 watt, compared to the lower channels when these modems were built, which at the time was 0.050 watts, or 50 mw.  The rules in Canada have changed now and the lower channels are allowed to run 200 mw, but, that won't affect the modem at any time as they were cleared to operate in Canada with the lower power levels in the lower channels.  If you knew what bandwidth was used by the remote devices you would decide to use 80 Mhz for times when you worked closer to the modem, or 40 Mhz if you were working further away.  Typically, smaller remote device will support 20 Mhz, and maybe 40 Mhz. You would have to do some investigation to find that out.  That's a thing to do when all else is done.

 

5. Just for the heck of it, try this. Log into the modem and navigate to ADMIN .... DIAGNOSTICS .... WIRELESS SURVEY.  Run the survey just to see what turns up for users in both the 2.4 and 5 Ghz bands.  Interestingly enough, I suspect that you will find that the modem is far more sensitive than a typical remote device or laptop, given its three 2.4 and three 5 Ghz antenna, and that there might be numerous other transmitters that didn't show up on inSSIDer image.  That might give you additional info in determining what channels to use as well as food for thought on deciding to buy a router.

 

6. Given the signal levels in the 2.4 Ghz band, I would try to shift anything that you could up into the 5 Ghz band, assuming that some of the devices that you have are dual band.

 

7.  While you are logged into the modem, have a look at the STATUS PAGE, specifically the upper right hand corner and see if there are two IP addresses there, one IPV4 and one much longer IPV6 address.  I don't want to know the addresses, just if there are two of them present.  If so, please try the following IPV6 trace.  Bring up a command prompt and type in:

 

tracert -6 ipv6.google.com

 

If it completes all the way to the end, possibly missing one or two lines your modem should be ok.  If the trace doesn't run at all, then I would recommend a factory reset of the modem to ensure that its completely updated.  After the reset, you should see the two IP addresses and be able to run  the trace and a successful test at:

 

http://ipv6-test.com/

 

A successful test would be 19 or 20 out of 20.  Unfortunately running a factory rest also means resetting all of the parameters such as the wifi parameters. 

 

8. Last question, when say that you would lose internet connectivity, do you happen to know if that was occurring on both the 2.4 and 5 Ghz bands, and more importantly, did you also lose connectivity on the ethernet side as well?  There have been cases in the not too distant past where what appeared to be a modem failure was actually caused by a faulty ethernet or wifi adapter, which for some reason caused the modem to stop responding.  My only guess is that the failing port or adapter would tie up the network controller on the modem causing what appeared to be a modem failure.  If you can determine that both wifi plus the ethernet networks are failing at the same time, that might point to a case of a failing ethernet port or wifi adapter.  That would require you to isolate the ethernet, 2.4 and 5 Ghz network devices, one network at a time, looking for the next failure so that you can rule out the disconnected network devices.  To start, you would disconnect or power down the ethernet devices.  If you happened to still see a failure when say the ethernet devices are all disconnected, then the failure cause isn't an ethernet device.  Power those up and disconnect the 2.4 Ghz devices.  There was a problem with earlier firmware versions where powering down one wifi network would also cause the other wifi network to power down.  I don't know if that problem still exists. If not, you can simply turn off the wifi networks one at a time on the modem, looking for the next failure.  If the problem still exists, then you could change the wifi network name or passphase in the modem for a temporary test period and then change it back when you're done testing (isolating) that network.  When at some point, you determine the network that is causing the failure, then its a matter of isolating the device that is the problem by isolating each device, one at a time.

 

9. The other thought is a power bar, if you happen to use one to power all of your equipment.  These typically contain a metal oxide varistor to protect the connected equipment from any overvoltage condition.  If and when these varistors fail, then can emit enough RF noise to kill the RG-6 and ethernet signal levels and signal to noise ratios.  The noise can bleed over into adjacent cables such as the modem's RG-6 and ethernet cables.  So, one check you could to is to disconnect the power bar completely and run the equipment off of an extension cord if necessary, looking for the next failure to rule out any power bar issues.

 

10.  One final check is to load and run pingplotter, which can be found at www.pingplotter.com.  It will run in PRO mode for 14 days before it kicks down to Freebie mode if you don't buy the intermediate or advanced licence.  When you have that loaded, and started, right click on the top title bar to bring up the column menu.  Select MAX and JTTR to display those columns and drag those columns to the right so that their sitting beside the MIN column.  In the Focus drop down menu on the upper right, select ALL for now so that it holds and displays the extreme values of the MIN, MAX, Jitter and Packet loss data and averages the ping times from the time that its selected.  This will show if at some point you have packet loss problems, even if that comes and goes.  Then start a test session out to something like google.ca. and hit the green "Go" button.  When that is running, right click on the IP address that is just below the modem's IP address.  Select the 2nd choice to copy the IP and then paste that into the address bar and hit the go button the the right hand side of the address bar again.  In that configuration, you're pinging the CMTS and the bottom display will also show if there is any packet loss issues between the modem and the CTMS.  If there is, it can be addressed by tech support.  Drag the bottom area up to the bottom of the data area to expand the scaling for that lower data area.   Right click on the lower area and set the display time for 10 minutes.  Let that run for ten minutes, filling the lower display area.  Then, select Edit .... Copy as Image.  Dump the clipboard contents to something like MS paint, wipe out the line 1 address as it will most likely will be an IPV6 address for your modem and then save that image.  Run another test but this time change the Focus time in the upper right to 30 seconds.  To start that, hit the down arrow next to the pause button and select "Reset and Restart".  Let that run for a minute or two.  This will show if you have ongoing packet loss problems as the data lookback for the upper data area is only 30 seconds instead of all of the data.  Then run the same Edit .... Copy as image routine......  If you see any packet loss shown in the packet loss column at any time, copy that image and save it and post that data.  Thats what I'm interested at this point.  If you are having problems, the best approach to this is to run it via ethernet so that there are no wifi issues mixed up in the data.  Seeing the plot during periods when you lose wifi connectivity might give you an idea if its really a wifi issue or perhaps a modem signal issue or packet loss issue.  

Insert those images into a post and indicate which Focus time is applicable.. 

 

Ok, lots of items to check and consider. Please let me know what you find.



JesseAndJen
I'm Here A Lot
Posts: 6

Re: Losing internet connection CGN3ACSMR

I seem to be having similar issues to OP. I have created a new thread that documents my issues in detail so not to hijack this one with a long post. I'm at my wits end... if anyone can help, I'll love you forever!

 

http://communityforums.rogers.com/t5/forums/forumtopicpage/board-id/Getting_connected/message-id/353...

User1704
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Re: Losing internet connection CGN3ACSMR

I also have this problem and so does a friend. It's either Rogers service or this modem/router that's fautly. I notice each time this happens and I power cycle the modem I do get a new Public IP so perhaps when Rogers is trying to send me a new IP the modem is messing up and not renewing the new address. 

RogersCorey
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 1,498

Re: Losing internet connection CGN3ACSMR

Hi @User1704,

 

How often is this happening? Your IP address should absolutely renew automatically and seamlessly.

 

RogersCorey

User1704
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Re: Losing internet connection CGN3ACSMR

Hi @RogersCorey,

 

Every 24-48 hours it seems to happen.