cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Ignite Internet speeds wrong?

Tmothy12
I'm a Regular

Just upgraded from Hybrid Fibre 30 to Ignite 60. On Hybrid Fibre 30 I got 30 down and 5 up as promised. Now that we have Ignite 60 speeds are all over the place. When the internet package switched over wifi was dropping so I reset the router. I ran speed tests and found that all devices were getting 10 down as promised. BUT I also found that all devices were getting 30 down.

 

Due to resetting the router the 5GHz network got enabled and I gave that a try. (It was disabled since we had no 5G devices at the time of setup.) I found there was a very noticeable speed difference on my iPod touch so I ran a speed test. I was surprised to find that it was getting speeds of 100/10 rather than 60 or 30. It's nice that the 5G network is so fast but I only have one 5G capable device. It seems consistant that whenever someone uses a 5G device on the network the speeds are around the same as the iPod.

 

I did further testing by moving the PC and plugging it directly into the router. When plugged in it got speeds of around 70-80 down which I suspect is normal for the Ignite 60 package.

 

First of all, why is the 5GHz network faster than wired? And what's wrong with the 2.4GHz network? The upload speed increased fine but download stayed the same. Is this normal?

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions

Re: Ignite Internet speeds wrong?

Datalink
Resident Expert

1. Can you look at the back of the modem and let us know what model of modem you have, as indicated on the product sticker.  It should read one of: CGN2, CGN3, CGN3ACR, CGN3ACSMR.

 

2. The 5 Ghz speeds are a product of the wider bandwidth in the 5 Ghz bands which can be set via the 5 Ghz controls in the modem.  Depending on what model you have, it will be either 20 Mhz, 40 Mhz, or 20/40 Mhz. The CGN3ACSMR (?) and/or the new CGNM-3552 also have an 80 Mhz setting.  Its much easier to run 40 Mhz wide channels in the 5 Ghz band due to the fact that there are fewer users and the fact that 5 Ghz signals don't have as much range as 2.4 Ghz signals.  The end result is better channel selection, wider bandwidths and higher data rates.  This might be coupled with the number of antenna on the device as well.  Typically small devices have a single antenna, but there are some that also have dual antenna which will give you a higher data rate. I'd have to look up the phone model to determine how many antenna it has.

 

3. The 2.4 Ghz band is oversubscribed and therefore difficult to operate in, unless you happen to live out in the country somewhere. With only three 20 Mhz wide channels that don't overlap with each other, its difficult if not impossible to find and operate in a clear channel. Operating a 40 Mhz wide channel can be impossible depending on where you live.  The usual result is that your channel has more users than just yourself, or, there is someone operating on an adjacent channel, resulting in interference with your channel.  This results in slow data rates and in some cases it might be impossible to run on the channel that you are presently on.  This can be detected by using inSSIDer, which is a wifi monitoring application.  Load the linked application on your laptop and have a look at the number of users in both the 2.4 and 5 Ghz bands.  If your laptop doesn't support 5 Ghz wifi, the lower right hand section of the display will be empty. The power level starts at zero at the top and descends from there.  What you want to see is your network as the highest network shown, with the other overlapping networks 40 to 45 dbmw below yours in order for your network to run without any problems.  As that power level separation between your network and the adjacent network decreases, the result is more noise for your network to overcome.  The wifi network then dedicates more bits to checksum data versus real data, so, the number of data bits versus checksum bits is dynamic and will vary as the background noise levels change. So, by looking at the display, you can then decide which channel offers the least interference and select that channel in the modem.  What you might find is that there are so many other users in the 2.4 Ghz band that it might be time to consider migrating to the 5 Ghz band by using a USB wifi dongle for your laptop if necessary and planning your future purchases to ensure that they are 5 Ghz capable.

 

http://www.techspot.com/downloads/5936-inssider.html

 

Note this is the last freebie version of this program.  It doesn't show the 802.11ac networks that operate in the 5 Ghz band so it doesn't present the complete 5 ghz band picture, so to speak.  There is a new version out that displays the nearby 802.11ac networks and which will run on a normal 802.11n 5 Ghz capable laptop.  The program reads the transmit headers which can be received by such a laptop and will display the 802.11n and 802.11ac networks.

 

4. Lastly, the connected data rates.  If you have a CGN3 series modem, you can look at the back of the modem and see what colour the connected port LED happens to be.  If its amber, the port to port data connection rate is 1 Gb/s, which supports data rates up to ~1 Gb/s.  If its green, the port to port connection rate is 10/100 Mb/s, which will give you a max data rate of approx 95 mb/s.  Close to 100 Mb/s but not quite there.  If you have a CGN2 or CGN3 series modem, you can find the connected data rate by right clicking on the internet icon on the lower right hand side of the monitor and selecting "Open Network and Sharing Center".  Select the Ethernet link on the middle right hand side of the page to open the Ethernet Status panel. The speed that is listed is the port to port connection rate.  If its 100 Mb/s, then seeing something in the order of 70 to 80 Mb/s for a data rate is not out of line.  That will depend on whats behind the ethernet port, ie, ethernet controller, CPU, memory amount and speed, hard disk or SSD rates, etc.  Typically on a 60/10 internet package, with overprovisioning (Speedboost) you would see approx 95 Mb/s as a peak rate during the test.  Now if you know that you have a gigabit port on the pc, then the 100 Mb/s connection rate would tell you that you have a problem with the ethernet cable that you are using, or, that the cable is not connecting properly at one or both ends and as a result, the two ports are negotiating down to a 100 Mb/s connection rate in order to run.  In that case, unplug the cable at both ends and plug it back into the ports or swap the cable with another one that you know is in good working order.

 

If you use the same path to "Open Network and Sharing Center" on a wifi connected device, you will see the wifi port to port connected rate.  That rate should vary as you walk around the house and the signal levels and noise background changes.

 

Hope this helps. Let us know what you find.



View solution in original post

11 REPLIES 11

Re: Ignite Internet speeds wrong?

RogersPrasana
Retired Moderator

Hi @Tmothy12

 

Thanks for posting on the Community Forums!

 

This sounds like something one of Resident Experts can provide some insight to , @Gdkitty or @Datalink?

 

@RogersPrasana

 

Re: Ignite Internet speeds wrong?

Datalink
Resident Expert

1. Can you look at the back of the modem and let us know what model of modem you have, as indicated on the product sticker.  It should read one of: CGN2, CGN3, CGN3ACR, CGN3ACSMR.

 

2. The 5 Ghz speeds are a product of the wider bandwidth in the 5 Ghz bands which can be set via the 5 Ghz controls in the modem.  Depending on what model you have, it will be either 20 Mhz, 40 Mhz, or 20/40 Mhz. The CGN3ACSMR (?) and/or the new CGNM-3552 also have an 80 Mhz setting.  Its much easier to run 40 Mhz wide channels in the 5 Ghz band due to the fact that there are fewer users and the fact that 5 Ghz signals don't have as much range as 2.4 Ghz signals.  The end result is better channel selection, wider bandwidths and higher data rates.  This might be coupled with the number of antenna on the device as well.  Typically small devices have a single antenna, but there are some that also have dual antenna which will give you a higher data rate. I'd have to look up the phone model to determine how many antenna it has.

 

3. The 2.4 Ghz band is oversubscribed and therefore difficult to operate in, unless you happen to live out in the country somewhere. With only three 20 Mhz wide channels that don't overlap with each other, its difficult if not impossible to find and operate in a clear channel. Operating a 40 Mhz wide channel can be impossible depending on where you live.  The usual result is that your channel has more users than just yourself, or, there is someone operating on an adjacent channel, resulting in interference with your channel.  This results in slow data rates and in some cases it might be impossible to run on the channel that you are presently on.  This can be detected by using inSSIDer, which is a wifi monitoring application.  Load the linked application on your laptop and have a look at the number of users in both the 2.4 and 5 Ghz bands.  If your laptop doesn't support 5 Ghz wifi, the lower right hand section of the display will be empty. The power level starts at zero at the top and descends from there.  What you want to see is your network as the highest network shown, with the other overlapping networks 40 to 45 dbmw below yours in order for your network to run without any problems.  As that power level separation between your network and the adjacent network decreases, the result is more noise for your network to overcome.  The wifi network then dedicates more bits to checksum data versus real data, so, the number of data bits versus checksum bits is dynamic and will vary as the background noise levels change. So, by looking at the display, you can then decide which channel offers the least interference and select that channel in the modem.  What you might find is that there are so many other users in the 2.4 Ghz band that it might be time to consider migrating to the 5 Ghz band by using a USB wifi dongle for your laptop if necessary and planning your future purchases to ensure that they are 5 Ghz capable.

 

http://www.techspot.com/downloads/5936-inssider.html

 

Note this is the last freebie version of this program.  It doesn't show the 802.11ac networks that operate in the 5 Ghz band so it doesn't present the complete 5 ghz band picture, so to speak.  There is a new version out that displays the nearby 802.11ac networks and which will run on a normal 802.11n 5 Ghz capable laptop.  The program reads the transmit headers which can be received by such a laptop and will display the 802.11n and 802.11ac networks.

 

4. Lastly, the connected data rates.  If you have a CGN3 series modem, you can look at the back of the modem and see what colour the connected port LED happens to be.  If its amber, the port to port data connection rate is 1 Gb/s, which supports data rates up to ~1 Gb/s.  If its green, the port to port connection rate is 10/100 Mb/s, which will give you a max data rate of approx 95 mb/s.  Close to 100 Mb/s but not quite there.  If you have a CGN2 or CGN3 series modem, you can find the connected data rate by right clicking on the internet icon on the lower right hand side of the monitor and selecting "Open Network and Sharing Center".  Select the Ethernet link on the middle right hand side of the page to open the Ethernet Status panel. The speed that is listed is the port to port connection rate.  If its 100 Mb/s, then seeing something in the order of 70 to 80 Mb/s for a data rate is not out of line.  That will depend on whats behind the ethernet port, ie, ethernet controller, CPU, memory amount and speed, hard disk or SSD rates, etc.  Typically on a 60/10 internet package, with overprovisioning (Speedboost) you would see approx 95 Mb/s as a peak rate during the test.  Now if you know that you have a gigabit port on the pc, then the 100 Mb/s connection rate would tell you that you have a problem with the ethernet cable that you are using, or, that the cable is not connecting properly at one or both ends and as a result, the two ports are negotiating down to a 100 Mb/s connection rate in order to run.  In that case, unplug the cable at both ends and plug it back into the ports or swap the cable with another one that you know is in good working order.

 

If you use the same path to "Open Network and Sharing Center" on a wifi connected device, you will see the wifi port to port connected rate.  That rate should vary as you walk around the house and the signal levels and noise background changes.

 

Hope this helps. Let us know what you find.



View solution in original post

Re: Ignite Internet speeds wrong?

It's the CGN3ACSMR. The inSSIDer program suggested I switch to band 11. I changed it which seems to have increased the computer's speed closer to around or just above 40 instead of barely reaching 30 as before. It doesn't seem to have had any effect on any other devices.

Re: Ignite Internet speeds wrong?

That change would only affect the 2.4 Ghz data rate.  Can you do a screen capture, (Ctrl-Alt-Prt Scr), then dump that into something like Microsoft Paint.  Wipe out your MAC address on the image, save the image and then post it into this thread.  That way I can have a look at the power levels of the various networks that you are contending with.  In our neighborhood we have about 35 to 40 2.4 Ghz modems and routers running.  I've basically given up on running anything on a 2.4 Ghz network and moved just about everything up to the 5 Ghz band.