Hitron CNG3 802.11n modem bridge mode setup with 802.11 ac third party router

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 18

Re: Hitron CNG3 802.11n modem bridge mode setup with 802.11 ac third party router

Thanks so much for great suggestions VivienM!  Just one more (probably silly) question please.  Do the two routers (the main one in the basement and the AP on the 2nd floor) have to be physically connected with each other?  That would mean that I would rely that there is an ethernet cable already running in the house between basement and the 2nd floor.  Is that correct?

Thanks again.

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Re: Hitron CNG3 802.11n modem bridge mode setup with 802.11 ac third party router

Yes, to run a 2nd router as an AP, you would need network cable of some form running there.

 

 

Only other option, is to use a wifi repeater... which can be hit and miss sometimes.


I am not using the 68u, only the 66u myself, on the 60/10 plan.

I currently am in a 1900 sq ft house.  I have the MODEM in the basement, and a network cable running up to the main floor, central in the house, with the N66u there.

I am able to get coverage in pretty much every corner.  2.4 full bars everywhere, 5ghz, 3-4(of 5) bars even in the farthest corner.

 

SO if running a cable all the way to the 2nd floor.. just putting it more central, may be enough with the 68u



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Re: Hitron CNG3 802.11n modem bridge mode setup with 802.11 ac third party router

To add to VivienM’s post, if you have structured wiring or just Ethernet cabling installed, running data upstairs or downstairs will be easy. Structured wiring is a wiring bundle consisting of two RG-6 cables for satellite or cable TV, one Cat-5e or better Ethernet cable for data and one Cat-3 (or possibly Cat-5e) for phone, all held together as a bundle by a loose nylon mesh. When installed, there is usually one bundle run to most rooms which starts at the structured wiring cabinet down in the basement. The builder might install a connector on one of the RG-6 cables or the telephone Cat-3, and leave the remaining cable ends tucked in behind the wallplate without any connectors installed. So, its up to the home owner to install the necessary keystones (connectors) and wallplates upstairs and connector ends downstairs. Typically you would install a patch panel downstairs to hold the Cat-5e keystones, but you don’t necessarily have to install a patch panel. That will depend on how much room you have available where ever the cables terminate downstairs. To support the rest of the house for data you would need a gigabit switch located in the structured wiring cabinet, connected to all of the other house Ethernet cables. The connected system would be as follows:

 

Incoming Rogers RG-6 cable from outside tap -- Modem -- Ethernet Cat-5e or Cat-6 -- Gigabit switch -- Short Patch cable -- Keystone (possibly in patch panel) connected to Cat-5e running upstairs to wallplate -- Patch cable -- Router or other device

 

To use a modem only installed in the cabinet the plan would look like this:

 

Incoming Rogers RG-6 cable from outside tap -- Modem -- Short Patch cable -- Keystone (possibly in patch panel) connected to Cat-5e running upstairs to wallplate -- Patch cable -- Router or other device

 

If the modem is parked in the wiring cabinet you can connect the some of the upstairs ethernet cables to the ports on the modem. Beyond 4 cables however, you would need to use a gigabit switch to support the remaining cables. The switch is connected from any one of its ports to one of the ports of the modem, and then connected to the rest of the Ethernet cables through any of the other switch ports.

 

You can order short patch cables from Monoprice for use between the Gigabit switch and the downstairs keystone (connector). If you have to install a keystone, or maybe more, its easy to do as they are marked with the Ethernet wire colours that you would match up to the cable wire colours and all you need beyond that is a 110 Punch Down tool to push the wires onto the keystone connector points.

 

With the Ethernet in place, you can connect a second router upstairs to give you coverage on the second floor. As VivienM indicated, newer routers have an access point mode available that makes it easy to set up a router to act as an access point only instead of as a router. The router in the basement or elsewhere would be in charge of the network in terms of firewall duties, assigning LAN IP address to all network devices and also in terms of any processing such as QOS, traffic monitoring etc, etc. If you have a second router that does not have an Access Point mode available, its not hard to set it up to run as an Access Point. Its just a matter of assigning an IP address to it, turning off the DHCP, setting up the wireless parameters and then connecting to one of it’s LAN ports instead of the WAN port.

 

Finally, if there is structured wiring in the home, you don’t have to park the modem in the basement. It can sit elsewhere in the home, connected via house RG-6 cable to the incoming RG-6 cable. Mine is on the main floor, connected in turn, via Ethernet to a gigabit switch in the basement. That way, I can use the modem ports if I choose, and keep an eye on it as well.



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Re: Hitron CNG3 802.11n modem bridge mode setup with 802.11 ac third party router

Wow! So much useful information guys!  Thanks so much, Datalink, Gdkitty, VivienM!  I will keep all of this in mind, and will act depending on what the current situation is in the house is.

Thanks again all.

 

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Re: Hitron CNG3 802.11n modem bridge mode setup with 802.11 ac third party router


@Gdkitty wrote:

Only other option, is to use a wifi repeater... which can be hit and miss sometimes.


I haven't used those, but they've always struck me as a bad bad bad idea...

 

... for two reasons:

1) Your wifi performance will be halved

2) Placement. You need to place the repeater close enough to the main access point that it gets a good signal... but also close enough to where the devices that can't reach the main access point are. That strikes me as a very difficult balance...

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Re: Hitron CNG3 802.11n modem bridge mode setup with 802.11 ac third party router

Yeah..
For INDOOR use i would say just find a way to run a network cable and put in another AP.

 

I have a BASIC repeater for outside in the back yard..  It only repeates the 2.4 and 150m N only.
But it works.   Its not there for proving the BEST speeds..  its there to just extend the usage into the back yard for phones, etc so we are not using up cellular data if out there.
(also use it for basic streaming out there.. i have a airport express set up as a music endpoint, set up to speakers out there... so can stream from internet radio, etc to the airport, etc).

Its in a spot, which would NOT be easy to run a network cable out to.

For a sub $30 extender, it works 🙂

I would never use one for more than BASIC usage.



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Re: Hitron CNG3 802.11n modem bridge mode setup with 802.11 ac third party router

I have a cisco wireless wrt400n. When I try to get into it I end up in my Hitron. I know the Hitron is at 192.168.0.1 and thought my cisco was at 192.168.100.1 . I have lan into the cisco and turned off the Hitron but it will not let me in because of no internet conction (hitron). I have hit the reset button on the cisco a few times. What amI missing.

 

 

Steve
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Re: Hitron CNG3 802.11n modem bridge mode setup with 802.11 ac third party router

From the user manual located at:

 

http://downloads.linksys.com/downloads/userguide/WRT400N_V10_UG_A-WEB,0.pdf

 

The Router’s default IP address,192.168.1.1 or http://wrt400n.com

 

Its interesting that 192.168.0.1 takes you to the Hitron.  That does surprise me, unless the Hitron modem is running in Gateway mode instead of Bridge mode. 

 

1.  Are you using the ethernet ports on the Hitron modem as well as the router ports?  If so, then the Hitron is running in Gateway mode.  With a router behind it, the modem is normally set to run in Bridge mode.  You can run the modem in Gateway mode with the router set specifically to run as an access point, leaving the modem to provide firewall and DHCP duties. 

 

2.  If you can reach the modem by using 192.168.0.1, or 192.168.100.1, log in and see if the BASIC ..... GATEWAY FUNCTION, Residential Gateway Function is disabled, ie: the modem is in Bridge mode. 

 

3.  Out of curiosities sake, can you post the modem model number:  CGN3, CGN3ACR or CGN3ACSMR.

 

4.  If you bring up a command prompt and type:  ipconfig/all    you should see the network details for the pc or laptop.  If you look at the Default Gateway address in the second data group, it should probably be 192.168.1.1



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Re: Hitron CNG3 802.11n modem bridge mode setup with 802.11 ac third party router

Resdential Gateway mode enabled. CGN3ROG

 

I am using lan in the Hitron as well as the cisco.

 

I just want to add all my TV stuff to wired as opposed to wireless because of interference. I had it set up already but I moved everything.


@Datalink wrote:

From the user manual located at:

 

http://downloads.linksys.com/downloads/userguide/WRT400N_V10_UG_A-WEB,0.pdf

 

The Router’s default IP address,192.168.1.1 or http://wrt400n.com

 

Its interesting that 192.168.0.1 takes you to the Hitron.  That does surprise me, unless the Hitron modem is running in Gateway mode instead of Bridge mode. 

 

1.  Are you using the ethernet ports on the Hitron modem as well as the router ports?  If so, then the Hitron is running in Gateway mode.  With a router behind it, the modem is normally set to run in Bridge mode.  You can run the modem in Gateway mode with the router set specifically to run as an access point, leaving the modem to provide firewall and DHCP duties. 

 

2.  If you can reach the modem by using 192.168.0.1, or 192.168.100.1, log in and see if the BASIC ..... GATEWAY FUNCTION, Residential Gateway Function is disabled, ie: the modem is in Bridge mode. 

 

3.  Out of curiosities sake, can you post the modem model number:  CGN3, CGN3ACR or CGN3ACSMR.

 

4.  If you bring up a command prompt and type:  ipconfig/all    you should see the network details for the pc or laptop.  If you look at the Default Gateway address in the second data group, it should probably be 192.168.1.1


 

Steve
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Posts: 285

Re: Hitron CNG3 802.11n modem bridge mode setup with 802.11 ac third party router

Oh and ipconfig gives me 192.168.0.1 that was the first thing I checked. 0.1 is the Hitron on a private network. I want to turn off DCHP and wireless off on the Cisco
Steve