Hitron CGN3, two routers-Same IP address, different SSID

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I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Hitron CGN3, two routers-Same IP address, different SSID

I have the Rogers Hitron CGN3 in bridge mode with a cable going from a yellow port (LAN) to a netgear gigabyte switch.  From the switch I have a cable run to a wireless router (ASUS RT-RC68U) on one side of my house and this router handles DHCP.  The router has typical IP address of 192.168.1.1 and for example SSID of HOUSE1.  I found I was getting spotty connection on upper floor (opposite side of large house) and so wanted to run a second router.  Rather than connecting to the switch as the first router is, I connected a second router (ASUS RT-RC55U)directly to a yellow LAN port of bridged Hitron and gave it SSID of HOUSE2, but kept it as IP address 192.168.1.1.

 

Now, several things, some out of curiosity, some out of "am I right in the way I have done this...is there a better way?":

 

1-Even though each router has its own SSID, COULD I still get an IP conflict?  Should I reserve IP range from primary router of starting at 192.168.1.3 and thus assign a static IP to second router of 192.168.1.2?

 

2-I didn't set second router as a range extender because I assume this will only cut the bandwidth.  Is that correct in this scenario?  The second router would act as one of the clients of the first and have for example only 1/10th of the bandwidth versus what I have done now which gives it its own bandwidth?

 

3-While configuring router admin passwords I noticed in the Asus network map that most of my devices are connecting at 2.4GHz, despite both of the routers being dual band.  I know the limitations of distance of 5 Ghz. as a result, is it better to set up two SSID names for each router (example HOUSE1, HOUSE1-5G, HOUSE2, HOUSE2-5G) so at least I know which band each device connects to.  Will the router always choose the BEST connection, or if it connects first to 2.4GHz it won't "look" for better 5G if within proximity?

 

4-Is it still the community suggestion to have gateway turned off the Hitron and use a secondary router to handle DHCP or have things improved significantly with new firmware or such?

 

5-Without buying any more expensive equipment, is there a better/faster/more streamlined way of accomplishing my goal of getting better coverage with the optimal speed connection I can get?

 

Thanks!

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 10

Re: Hitron CGN3, two routers-Same IP address, different SSID

1. Your two routers are isolated from each other. With the modem in bridged mode, the LAN ports are disconnected from each other. Therefore, you have TWO distinct networks, and it will work fine if the gateways on both use the same IP. The drawback is that they will not be able to communicate with each other. Furthermore, you are also using TWO Rogers IPs, on account of using two ports on your bridged modem. I don't know if Rogers allows this.

2. It won't cut out the bandwidth because you have two different networks on two likely different channels.

3. Always better to use different SSIDs for EACH transmitter. Consumer gear is not roaming friendly, in general.

3. Use different SSIDs for 2.4GHz and 5GHz. Sometimes, manufacturers call their routers "dual band" meaning they use fat channels (40MHz instead of 20MHz) on the 2.4GHz band. Manually pick on each client which band you want to connect to and let it auto-connect.

4. If your Hitron is in bridged mode, then your secondary router is handling DHCP. In fact, BOTH your secondary routers are running DHCP since you have your network set up in a spaghetti mess.

5. Yes. Much better way. Use one router as the gateway + DHCP server + DNS relay. This will be the first router in the chain. Connect any other access points to the main router's ports and set "slave router" to access point only. When you run out of ports on your main router, invest in a switch. *Do not use the Hitron modem as a switch if it is in BRIDGED mode* unless you want TWO distinct, separated and isolated networks.
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Re: Hitron CGN3, two routers-Same IP address, different SSID

Thanks for the thorough reply!  Awesome.  Some further clarifications:

 

on point 2, I know as is I have two different networks that are distinct. I meant in my question that if, instead of having connected that second router to the modem I had instead set it as a repeater or extender in Asus' router admin control panel, is it correct that this repeater or extender situation would give me significantly less bandwidth than the way i currently have it set up?

 

on point 4, I am aware it is currently using the DHCP table as you describe in your post.  I want to know if the community still advises that we put this particular modem in bridge mode and allow the secondary router to do the dhcp assignments or if firmware updates have now made the Hitron good enough that I should put it back in gateway mode, allowing it to handle DHCP and simply set my routers as access points?

 

on point 5, the only reason I set it the way I have now is that my modem and patch panel is in the middle of my basement of a 7000 sq ft home. The first router, also in the basement is on the west basement ceiling and the second new one I just added is on the east basement ceiling.  I have a suite above my garage that was unable to receive good connection due to wireless routers being so far from each other, each being essentially on opposite exterior walls of a large house.  Though I do have a patch panel and some wired connections, I don't know where they go.  The house was wired Cat6 when we bought it, but labels on the cables are things like "server" and "office 1".  As of yet, we have been unable to identify the location of most of these connections.

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 10

Re: Hitron CGN3, two routers-Same IP address, different SSID

2. Yes, you are correct. Any time you are daisy chaining extenders you are dividing down your bandwidth. That's why I recommended you physically connect each access point and set them up with a distinct SSID. It'll be more hassle on your client devices to switch back and forth but you will not degrade your connection. In my case, I have an old dd-wrt router set as an extender in my barn loft. I can connect (somewhat slowly) to my network from the back of my field and a little bit past the tree line. That's a few thousand feet. But there's no way I could run CAT6 from the house to the barn. I tried Powerline adapters but my barn is on a separate meter and Powerline ethernrt doesn't like to cross transformer windings.

4. I run my Hitron in bridge mode as of recently because I whipped up a pfsense box that acts as my gateway. The Hitron is better than most sub-$200 routers and IIRC its performance was acceptable. The lack of external antennae though, wasn't. It did fine at covering my entire house though. And its north of 5000sqft foot print with two stories and a full basement. (Huge country home, we are living the dream)

5. Get a tester and identify all the connections. If the house was wired properly every connection should trunk into a single patch panel. You could test each line in the house and figure out the corresponding port on the patch panel, and relabel accordingly.

Sounds like you are on your way to figuring this out.