Got a new rocket modem and have a question

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I'm a Regular
Posts: 75

Got a new rocket modem and have a question

I don't use wifi at all, the modem is only for my pc....so does it matter where I plug the cable in...either the 2.4ghz or th 5ghz?

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Re: Got a new rocket modem and have a question

Good evening @rye_encoke,

 

Thanks for your post and Welcome to the Forums!

 

If you do not wish to connect the Rocket Modem to your own router, in order to set up bridge mode, or if you do not need to use Wi-Fi at all, simply connect your Hitron modem to your computer using the Ethernet cable.

 

We're you experiencing issues with the wired connection?

 

Let us know if you need further assistance!

 

RogersMaude

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Re: Got a new rocket modem and have a question

@rye_encoke, when you connect a pc or laptop to the modem via ethernet, if either of those have a gigabit port and the ethernet cable is serviceable, the interconnect should operate at 1 Gb/s.  Thats the connection rate, and not the rate that results from your internet plan.  If the pc or laptop has a 100 Mb/s port, then the modem and device will negotiate down to a 100 mb/s connection rate.  If you look at the connected port LED at the back of the modem, a flashing Amber LED signifies a 1 Gb/s connection rate, flashing Green indicates a 10/100 M/bs connection rate. 

 

If you decide to use the wifi, your preference should be the 5 Ghz network over the 2.4 Ghz network as long as you are using the pc or laptop within a reasonable range of the modem.  The 5 Ghz networks have a higher bandwidth, but don't have the range of the 2.4 Ghz networks.  For the size of your home, you might find that you have no problems with range when you try the 5 Ghz network.  If that proves to be a problem, you can always try the 2.4 Ghz network.  You should set the channel for the 5 Ghz network to channel 149 or higher as the higher 5 Ghz channels can operate at 1 Watt whereas under the rules that these modems were approved, the lower 5 Ghz channels are restricted to 50 mw. 

 

The 2.4 Ghz channels can be very tough to work in as there are only three clear channels in the frequency band that don't overlap each other. Those are channels 1,6, and 11.  Every other 2.4 Ghz channel overlaps other some channel.  The good thing about a 2.4 GHz network is that it has longer range than the 5 Ghz networks.  The bad thing about a 2.4 GHz network is that it has longer range than the 5 Ghz networks.  As a result, the 2.4 Ghz networks can carry for some distance and as a result, your neighbors networks can and will interfere with your network, causing problems for your network.  That usually drives people to use the 5 Ghz networks for its open channels and higher bandwidth which gives you a better data rate. 

 

If you wanted to check out the wifi environment, download the freebie version inSSIDer to have a look at who else is using wifi near your home.  If this is loaded on a dual band pc or laptop, it will show both 2.4 and 5 Ghz networks that can be detected by the pc or laptop.  It does not show the latest generation 802.11ac networks that operate in the 5 Ghz band, so it doesn't show the whole 5 Ghz picture, so to speak, but, its still informative to see the other networks that are operating nearby.

 

http://www.techspot.com/downloads/5936-inssider.html

 

this link works for the windows version.  This doesn't work for the mac version as it load a version that requires a licence.  And in that case, you're better off downloading the latest licence version from the inSSIDer site.