FEEDBACK - Rogers Rocket Wi-Fi Modem Firmware Trial

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Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,050

Re: FEEDBACK - Rogers Rocket Wi-Fi Modem Firmware Trial

@Dh5959, run a Factory reset on the modem and see it that clears up the issue.  Depending on how far the firmware is updating, from the modem's original firmware to V4.5.8.22, you may have to run a Factory Reset to properly complete the update process.  You can hold the recessed reset button at the back of the modem for thirty seconds and release it, or, if you''re logged into the modem, navigate to ADMIN .... DEVICE RESET and run the Restore Factory Default Settings function.  You will unfortunately have to reset all of the parameters.  If you haven't seen the new login after the reset, start a web browser and enter 192.168.0.1 as the web address.  That takes you to the new set up page.  The one thing to remember is that the wifi passphrase that you set on that page is also the new modem password.  

 

To log back into the modem following that one time setup, use 192.168.0.1, and use the following credentials:

 

username:  cusadmin

password:  as you have just set for the wifi password

 

You can then navigate to the wifi or ADMIN .... MANAGEMENT pages to change the wifi passphrases or the modem password.



Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,050

Re: FEEDBACK - Rogers Rocket Wi-Fi Modem Firmware Trial

@dto7, I wonder if the update has resulted in a change of the wifi channel from where you were previously, to a channel that has interference issues which is causing the wifi to drop.  

 

Try this. Load inSSIDer on your laptop, which is a wifi monitoring application. When loaded on a dual band laptop, inSSIDer will monitor both 2.4 and 5 Ghz networks that can be detected by your laptop. Have a look to see what you're competing with in both bands.  After you have a look at the display, you might be able to determine if there are any 2.4 or 5 Ghz channels that are not in use, or offer less interference. That's usually pretty tough with 2.4. Ghz channels as the only channels that don't overlap with each other is 1, 6, and 11.  As a result, everyone tries to use those channels.  In the 5 Ghz band, the signal range is reduced compared to a 2.4 Ghz channel, so that, along with the fact there aren't as many users in the 5 Ghz band makes it easier to select an open channel.  If you're using the 5 Ghz band, you want to be using channel 149 or higher as the modem will use a higher allowable power output for those channels, resulting in increased range.  The program link below is for the last freebie version.  It doesn't display the 802.11ac networks in use in the 5 Ghz band.  There is a newer licenced version out now that will handle 802.11ac networks, and which will work on a 802.11n laptop.  The new version will read the broadcast management frames and display the 802.11ac networks that are running in the 5 Ghz band. If you use 5 Ghz networks, its worth the $20 U.S. to buy, so that you can see all of the 5 Ghz networks that are in use.

 

http://www.techspot.com/downloads/5936-inssider.html

 

What you want to see on the graphical display is that your network is the highest network shown, which indicates that it has the highest received power of all the received networks.  Generally you want somewhere in the neighborhood of 40 to 45 dBmW separation between your network and any other network that is on the same or overlapping channel.  So, while your network should be the tallest on the display, everything else should be well below yours.  When that power level separation decreases, you end up with interference and possibly with problems maintaining a wifi network.  Your only option is to change to a channel with less overlap from the competition. 

 

The other item to consider is to run a modem reset as indicated in Message #531 above.  That will ensure that the modem update is properly completed.    



Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,050

Re: FEEDBACK - Rogers Rocket Wi-Fi Modem Firmware Trial

@apdamato, have a look at message # 471 (top post) on the following page for the instruction on requesting the trial version, 4.5.8.22.

 

http://communityforums.rogers.com/t5/forums/forumtopicpage/board-id/Getting_connected/message-id/348...



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 13

Re: FEEDBACK - Rogers Rocket Wi-Fi Modem Firmware Trial

When trying to setup a new login password on the CGN3ACSMR running the latest .22 firmware the modem will not accept a password with the symbol @ previously modem password could have the @ symbol.  Anyone else having issues with the modem not accepting certain symbols within the password field? 

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 18

Re: FEEDBACK - Rogers Rocket Wi-Fi Modem Firmware Trial

So the senior technician stopped by last week and after spending about two hours troubleshooting he determined that the riser cable was "shorting" out. I was very skeptical when said this was the cause so a few days later I moved the modem into another room and tested it there. Same results, the modem was still rebooting itself.

 

After returning the modem to the original location I remembered seeing that most of the users in this thread are currently running their modems in gateway mode. So I disabled bridge mode and returned the modem to gateway functionality and disabled the wireless radios. Shortly after reconnecting the Internet I noticed that all the IP addresses had changed...

 

My IP address, CMTS IP, Rogers Internal network, & the destination IP address. It's like I was on a completely different network. After about 9 hours of testing my modem hasn't rebooted itself and seems to be more stable. The packetloss and high pings are still present.

 

Bridge mode pingplotter:

 http://imgur.com/q29tSqz.png

 

Gateway mode pingplotter:

http://imgur.com/XBK0xH2.png

 

@RogersDave @Datalink Is there a reason why modems in the bridge mode are being routed through a completely different network? and why is it when my modem is in bridge mode it can barely stayed connected for more than 30 minutes without rebooting itself?

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,050

Re: FEEDBACK - Rogers Rocket Wi-Fi Modem Firmware Trial

@Max24, when you run the modem in Gateway mode, the router should be set to run as an access point, in which case it would be invisible to the network and wouldn't show up on a trace.  You can definitely run the router with its own IP address, but, in practice, doing anything like port forwarding from the modem to the router to the device can be an interesting challenge.  I've never seen anyone claim to successfully do that.  

 

I can't explain why you're seeing a different 99.xxx.xxx.xxx address for the CMTS when you flip between Bridge mode and Gateway mode.  There's probably a reasonable technical reason for it which Dave could elaborate on.

 

Can you try the following?  Run the same tests, but run two sets of tests, one with the Focus time of pingplotter set to All, and one with the Focus time set to 5 seconds.  Set the bottom display time to 5 or 10 min and let the application run for that entire 5 or 10 min timeframe.  Please run them in the following configurations::

 

1.  Modem in Bridge mode, router in full router mode:  run a ping to anywhere, then copy the line 2 address and paste that into the address bar.  Run the ping test to that address which is the CMTS.  Thats the 99.237.32.1 address in the first slide.  Any packet loss that is directly attributable to the modem - cmts connection will show up in the lower area of the display.  For the time being, ignore anything that occurs beyond the CMTS.  

 

2.  Modem in Gateway mode, router disconnected.  Connect a pc / laptop directly to the modem, just to keep the addressing simple and straightforward.  Same as above, run the ping test, following the same instructions. Thats the 99.224.30.1 address.

 

Capture and post the results, indicating which run is which.  Since this is running IPV4, you can leave all of the details in the image.  If you were running IPV6 you would only have to delete the IP address for line 1 which would be the modem or router's IP address, depending on what the network setup is.  Seeing the ping times will help with the analysis.  Right click in the column title bar, select MAX and Err and drag those to the right to sit beside the Avg and Min data.

 

Running the pingplot, only out to the CMTS address will readily display the ping times to the CMTS, and any packet loss to and from the CMTS, which should also be reflected on the lower time display.  Anything further downstream will remain out of the picture for now.  The goal is to determine the performance from the modem to the CMTS.

 

1.  Can you confirm that you have a CGN3ACSMR as seen by the product sticker on the back of the modem?  

 

And, can you log in to the modem and:

 

2.  confirm the Software Version (firmware) as indicated on the Status page which comes up when you log into the modem.  I'm wondering what version is loaded and why an IPV6 addresses are not showing up on the pingplot.  Do you have IPV6 disabled in the router?  If so, not a big deal, just wondering.  If you have a CGN3ACSMR with V4.5.8.21 loaded, have you done a factory reset recently?  I've seen unpredictable results if the modem has not had a factory reset completed.

 

3.  navigate to the STATUS....DOCSIS WAN page, copy the downstream and upstream tables and paste them into a post.  The copy and paste process will paste in the text contents of the tables, so you don't have to post a screen capture.  

 

Ok, that should do it for now. To really asses the images, I/we need to see those times to the CMTS and any indications of packet loss to the CMTS.  

 

Just wondering, the tech indicated that the riser cable is shorting.  Is that to imply that you're in an apartment/condo/highrise?



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 18

Re: FEEDBACK - Rogers Rocket Wi-Fi Modem Firmware Trial

@Datalink, I have a firewall(PC not router/linksys) setup between my PC and the modem so now that I'm stuck using the modem in gateway mode I've simply setup a DMZ for my firewall to avoid having to configure port fowarding etc... Haven't had any issues so far.

 

Since I've switched to gateway and haven't experienced any issues with my modem rebooting itself I'm pretty hesistant in making any additional config changes on the modem. So for your first request, Modem in bridge mode I'll just post the pingplotter from my session history.

 

1. Modem in bridge mode:

All: http://imgur.com/zXmezgG.png

5s: http://imgur.com/7j2wK1a.png

 

2. Modem in gateway mode:

All: http://imgur.com/W95d7rM.png

5s: http://imgur.com/GUm4bvR.png

 

The modem is a CGNM-3552-ROG running 4.5.8.22 with IPV4&6 IP addresses listed under the WAN IP address column. I have IPV6 disabled on my network and PC so it wouldn't be possible to run that test. I restored the modem to factory defaults when it was updated to .22 last week. I believe the tech was referring to the cable that runs from the main splitter to my modem upstairs (house), anyway his diagnoise was incorrect since the problem has been resolved by switching to gateway mode indicating the cable is infact not shorting out.

 

Modem signals:

Downstream Overview
Port ID	Frequency (MHz)	Modulation	Signal strength (dBmV)	Channel ID	Signal noise ratio (dB)
1	633000000	256QAM	1.100	37	40.366
2	363000000	256QAM	4.600	10	43.377
3	369000000	256QAM	4.800	11	43.377
4	375000000	256QAM	4.800	12	40.946
5	381000000	256QAM	4.500	13	40.946
6	387000000	256QAM	4.500	14	43.377
7	393000000	256QAM	4.700	15	43.377
8	399000000	256QAM	4.700	16	40.946
9	405000000	256QAM	4.800	17	43.377
10	411000000	256QAM	4.700	18	40.946
11	417000000	256QAM	4.800	19	40.946
12	423000000	256QAM	5.100	20	40.946
13	429000000	256QAM	5.000	21	43.377
14	435000000	256QAM	5.000	22	43.377
15	441000000	256QAM	4.800	23	40.946
16	447000000	256QAM	5.100	24	43.377
17	579000000	256QAM	2.800	29	40.946
18	585000000	256QAM	3.200	30	40.366
19	591000000	256QAM	3.000	31	40.366
20	597000000	256QAM	2.900	32	40.366
21	603000000	256QAM	2.600	33	40.946
22	609000000	256QAM	2.400	34	40.946
23	615000000	256QAM	1.800	35	40.946
24	621000000	256QAM	1.100	36	40.946
25	357000000	256QAM	4.700	9	42.600
26	639000000	256QAM	0.800	38	39.900
27	645000000	256QAM	1.100	39	39.900
28	651000000	256QAM	1.100	40	39.900
29	657000000	256QAM	2.000	41	39.900
30	663000000	256QAM	2.100	42	39.900
31	669000000	256QAM	2.200	43	39.900
32	675000000	256QAM	2.600	44	39.900
Upstream Overview
Port ID	Frequency (MHz)	Modulation	Signal strength (dBmV)	Channel ID	BandWidth
1	23700000	ATDMA - 64QAM	42.250	5	6400000
2	38596000	ATDMA - 64QAM	43.250	6	3200000
3	30596000	ATDMA - 64QAM	42.500	4	6400000

 

I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Re: FEEDBACK - Rogers Rocket Wi-Fi Modem Firmware Trial

I updated my modem's firmware in hopes of fixing the connection problem I had with my chromecast to the internet. This it did fix, however I have been occasionally experiencing no internet access even though I am connected to the wifi. Is there a way to fix this? 

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,050

Re: FEEDBACK - Rogers Rocket Wi-Fi Modem Firmware Trial

@Max24, looking at your recent image posts, and thinking about the problem of packet loss, there are a couple of things you could try.  

 

1.  Move the modem to the splitter for test purposes.  Depending on what else you are running, you could disconnect the splitter from the cable and connect the modem to the incoming cable.  That would prove or disprove the theory that the riser cable has a short in it.  If you still see packet loss, then the problem is most likely external to the house, but, keep in mind that if the incoming cable passes by any house power cable (in wall) that is subject to large current surges, like furnace motors, dryers, etc, the RG-6 cable can pick up noise.  

 

2.  If you have an ohm meter, you could disconnect the riser cable at both ends and run a continuity check on the cable, one lead on the center conductor and one lead on the external side of the connector.  The continuity check should show an open circuit as the cable center copper conductor should not come into contact with the cable shield which could be either aluminum foil or braided aluminum.  If the continuity check shows anything other than open circuit, then yes, it has a short.  All it would take is a nail driven into the cable at some point.  That might take years to show up, but at some point the copper oxidation would become a problem, even if the nail only nicked the cable.  It would also be worth taking a very careful look at both ends of the cable to ensure that the copper center conductor doesn't contact any portion of the cable shield, no matter how small that cable shield portion might be, such as a thread from a braided aluminum shield.  Time for the reading glasses or magnifying glass.

 

Hope this helps.



Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,050

Re: FEEDBACK - Rogers Rocket Wi-Fi Modem Firmware Trial

@qdu1128, try this. Load inSSIDer on your laptop, which is a wifi monitoring application.  When loaded on a dual band laptop, inSSIDer will monitor both 2.4 and 5 Ghz networks that can be detected by your laptop.  Have a look to see what you're competing with in both bands.  In a suburban area, the 2.4 Ghz band is usually pretty crowded and tough to work in.  Usually the 5 Ghz band is less crowded and easier to find a clear channel.  After you have a look at the display, you might be able to determine if there are any 2.4 or 5 Ghz channels that are not in use, or offer less interference.  Thats usually pretty tough with 2.4. Ghz channels as the only channels that don't overlap with each other is 1, 6, and 11.  As a result, everyone tries to use those channels. The program link below is for the last freebie version.  It doesn't display the 802.11ac networks in use in the 5 Ghz band.  There is a newer licenced version out now that will handle 802.11ac networks, and which will work on a 802.11n laptop. The new version will read the broadcast management frames and display the 802.11ac networks that are running in the 5 Ghz band. If you use 5 Ghz networks, its worth the $20 U.S. to buy, so that you can see all of the 5 Ghz networks that are in use.

 

http://www.techspot.com/downloads/5936-inssider.html

 

What you want to see on the graphical display is that your network is the highest network shown, which indicates that it has the highest received power of all the received networks.  Generally you want somewhere in the neighborhood of 40 to 45 dBmW separation between your network and any other network that is on the same or overlapping channel.  So, while your network should be the tallest on the display, everything else should be well below yours.  When that power level separation decreases, you end up with interference and possibly with problems maintaining a wifi network.  Your only option is to change to a channel with less overlap from the competition.  By looking at that display you might conclude that the 2.4 Ghz band is hopeless and that its time to move up to the 5 Ghz band, if you can.  If you have devices already running in the 5 Ghz band, change your operating channel to 149 or higher. If you can switch to any of those channels, do so, as the output power for those channels is higher, resulting in better signal levels, signal to noise ratios and data rates.

 

So, with inSSIDer loaded on your laptop, take a walk around your home.  Take a look at the display when you're close to the modem, and where you normally use your laptop. Essentially, you're doing a site survey.  It takes about three to four minutes for the display to settle out when you move around and stop in a location somewhere.  You should see some differences in the received network power levels as you move around your home, both for your own network, and those of your neighbors.  Perhaps one of your neighbors has bought a new modem or router and is competing for the same channels that you are using.  If so, inSSIDer will show that.

 

What you can do is take a screenshot of the inSSIDer display, dump it into something like Microsoft paint and wipe out your MAC address from the text and display area and then save it.  Insert it into a post so I can have a look at it if you need help with the interpretation.  With the info provided by the inSSIDer display it will be easier to determine what the problem might be.