Ethernet wall jacks question

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Re: Ethernet wall jacks question

@Harry112358 just so that you know what's going on with the cabling, pull the wallplate off of the wall and check the cable that connects to that port to see how many wire pairs are connected to the connector.  An ethernet connector for anything over 100 Mb/s requires all four wire pairs (8 wires) connected end to end.  If there are only two pairs of wires connected to the connector, that will allow you to run 100 Mb/s.  If there is only 1 wire pair connected to the connector, I'm not even sure what the device port controllers at both ends will do.  In theory both port controllers will negotiate a data rate based on the number of pairs available, just not sure what they would do with only one wire pair in operation.  

 

At the other end of that cable, if you can easily locate it, check to see how many wire pairs are connected.  This is the same situation as above.  

 

Fwiw, assuming that you're running something over 100 Mb/s for your internet plan, its worth the effort to change or install the keystones, properly connected to all four wire pairs.  Its really not a lot of trouble and you'll be much happier with the results.  Other customers have done this with good results when everything was completed.  



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Re: Ethernet wall jacks question

I think you are right. Makes more sense to check before buying adaptors. So, the speed from the ethernet doesnt depend on the type  of the cable - such as CAT5/5e/6 etc but on the number of wires connected inside the port? sorry bit confused on this one.

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Re: Ethernet wall jacks question

The data rate that you can see over ethernet depends on both factors, the number of wire pairs in operation and the cable type itself, Cat 5e, Cat 6, 7,8.

 

In general, you can run any ethernet cable type with only 2 wire pairs (4 wires) connected end to end.  That will provide 100 Mb/s service up to 100 meters.  

 

If you configure the same cable to connect with all four wire pairs (8 wires) then you can run gigabit ethernet up to 100 meters.

 

Now, over time, cable technology has improved the performance of the cable, allowing cables to run higher data rates, reaching into the 10 Gb/s range and beyond.  So, these days, Cat 5e is the lowest tier cable that you will usually see installed.  At the end of the day, it all comes down to cost as the higher performance cabling, Cat 6, 7 and 8 will cost more, but, its a small cost when you consider that ethernet cabling, once in place will probably be used for a very long time.  

 

Just to mention this, the push these days is for wifi to replace cable systems, by using mesh networks with multiple pods or access points around a home, in theory negating the requirement for ethernet cabling.  Only problem with that theory is that wifi channels are a fixed resource, as in there is a limited number of channels that everyone can use.  So, everyone shares the bandwidth, and when everyone is home at night, gaming, streaming, etc, etc, all over wifi, the channel usage increases which slows down everyone's wifi systems.  

 

What wifi enthusiasts fail to mention is that in order to feed multi-gig wifi, you need multi-gig ethernet.  That's coming in the form of improvements to the DOCSIS cable modem standards which will allow cable modems to run multi-gig data rates.  Fibre modems as in Bell's Fibre to the Home (non-DOCSIS) already run 1.5 Gb/s downstream with a promise to run 5 Gb/s this year.  We'll see if Bell manages to make that happen.  Beyond any modem that might provide multi-gig data rates, DOCSIS or non-DOCSIS, you need a method to distribute multi-gig data rates.  Sounds a little comical, but simply put, you can't do that with todays 1 Gb/s ethernet ports on devices.  The exception is to run two output ports on modems and two input ports on a router.  Both of those have to be  configured for Link Aggregation Group (LAG), running data simultaneously thru two ports.  That is available in the U.S. but doesn't appear to be wide spread at this time.  To get around the 1 Gb/s limitation, the Ethernet Alliance has developed new standards to change the signalling and encoding used in ethernet systems.  That has led to the 802.11bz standard which will allow 2.5, and 5 Gb/s over Cat 5e cabling.  With cabling such as Cat 6a or higher, you should be able to run 10 Gb/s.  

 

https://ethernetalliance.org/

 

There are motherboards and unmanaged switches out on the market today which will support the 802.11bz standard.  They can be rather pricey these days, but, that will improve as more device manufacturers incorporate 801.11bz ports and port controllers into their equipment. 

 

So, short answer, the data rates depend on the number of wire pairs used, and the quality of the ethernet cables themselves, higher quality cables, higher data rates.  The incorporation of 802.11bz standard into ethernet equipment will vastly improve the ethernet data rates, just have to build that into the numerous devices that consumers use, including modems.



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Re: Ethernet wall jacks question

Hello everyone,

 

I'm trying to reconfigure my home network. My house has cat6 wall jacks in various rooms and I want to connect an access point to a cat6 wall jack on the 2nd floor.

 

Pictures for reference: https://imgur.com/a/fc6kIim 

 

Picture 1 - Arris (modem?) in basement. Connected by coax cable to coax wall jack on 1st floor living room. Modem/router in picture 3 connected to coax wall jack in living room.

 

Picture 2 - Two small boxes in basement placed just above Arris device that ethernet cables can be attached to.
These presumably run to the wall jacks in the other areas of house.

 

So ultimately, how do I get the cat6 wall jacks around the house to go "live"? Do I need to move the modem/router in the living room to the basement, connect modem/router to Arris device via coax cable, and connect ethernet cable from modem/router to those picture 2 ethernet jacks?

 

Thanks for any help, I am quite a newbie!

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Re: Ethernet wall jacks question

@jdf580 your first picture is the Optical Network Unit (ONU) which is the fibre terminal, so, from that picture you have Fibre to the Home (FTTH).  The output of that ONU feeds the CODA-4582 modem that you have sitting upstairs.  So the challenge here is to connect the modem to your house ethernet cabling. 

 

From picture #2 it looks like the ethernet cabling in your home might be all set to go.  If you look around your home you should see wallplates with ethenet ports contained within the wallplate.  Hopefully, that, along with the ethernet keystones mounted in the boxes in picture #2 indicate that everything is finished, ready to go.  Understand here that I'm speculating at this point.  

 

So, if everything is ready to go, all you need is an unmanaged gigabit switch and jumper ethernet cables to connect the ports on those boxes to a gigabit switch. 

 

In picture #3, there is a green ethernet keystone mounted in the wallplate that contains the coax output which is connected to the modem.  I'm going to assume here that the green keystone in that wallplate matches up with the green keystone in the bottom box in picture #2.  Looks like someone was thinking ahead here.  If you look around your home, look for colored keystones in the wallplates and take note of the colour and location.  Then check those colours against the coloured keystones in those boxes.  Hopefully you will find that they all match up.  Red keystone upstairs, Red keystone in bottom box, etc, etc.  There are a couple of blue keystones and a couple of white keystones in the upper box, so, you're going to have to sort out where those keystones match up with the keystones upstairs.  

 

There are a couple of tasks at hand.  First is to match the keystones upstairs and downstairs, and the next is to determine how those keystones are wired up.  Ethernet cable consists of 4 pairs of wires, 8 wires in total.  You only need two pair of wires connected end to end in order to run 100 Mb/s.  To run anything over 100 Mb/s you need all 4 pairs of wires to be connected end to end.  There are two specifications that cover the wire to pin configurations for those keystones, so, the wires have to be connected in a particular order at both ends and they must be connected properly, or "punched down" properly at both ends.  

 

To do that properly you need a cable tester to check for continuity, end to end, and for the correct wire order.  Something like this:  

 

https://www.amazon.ca/Sperry-Instruments-TT64202-Tester-Master/dp/B004Y75B5Y

 

That will allow you to check the cabling from the boxes downstairs to their upstairs termination point. 

 

 

What you need, to run all of the house cabling is an unmanaged 8 port gigabit switch such as the following:

 

https://www.amazon.ca/s?k=unmanaged+gigabit+ethernet+switch&i=tools&ref=nb_sb_noss_1

 

https://www.canadacomputers.com/search/results_details.php?language=en&keywords=unmanaged%20gigabit&...

 

You will also need short 6 inch or 1 foot patch cables such as the following to connect the ports on the downstairs boxes to the ports on the gigabit switch:

 

https://www.monoprice.com/category/cables/networking-patch-cables

 

 

 

The reason that I suggest testing the cabling is my personal view that you can't assume that the cabling has been installed correctly and tested.  That is of course unless you brought in a technician to to this and he or she was able to provide an indication or proof that the cabling is installed correctly.  What is it that Russian proverb, "Trust but verify".  To do that, you can use the test tool above, which is simple to use, but, you can also use the gigabit switch in conjunction with the modem.  

 

When you have the switch on hand, connect the modem's bottom ethernet port to the keystone that sits in that same wallplate as shown in the photo.  In the basement, connect the gigabit switch to the green keystone port in the bottom box.  Power up the gigabit switch.  The switch itself should probably have an LED that indicates either 10/100 Mb/s or 1 Gb/s.  The LED should indicate a 1 Gb/s connection with the modem.  At the back of the modem, look at the connected port LED.  It should be flashing amber, which indicates a 1 Gb/s connection rate with the switch.  Note that the Hitron LED port colours are reversed from the industry standard, don't know why, so, you might see a difference in the LED colours between the modem and the switch.  Just have to know what the colours indicate on the switch.  

 

Ok, so, if you're satisfied that the cable and its connectors are connected properly, as evidenced by a 1 Gb/s indication at the modem and switch, disconnect the gigabit switch and connect a patch cable from the green keystone to the grey, red or blue keystone in that same box.  Take the switch upstairs to the matching keystone colour, plug in the switch and connect the ethernet cable to the ports.  You should see the same 1 Gb/s indication. 

 

Do the same for all keystones throughout the house.  Run the basement jumper cable from the bottom green keystone to the other keystones, moving the jumper cable to perform each cable test.  Take note of your results.  You should see a 1 Gb/s connection rate for all keystones upstairs.  

 

When that is done, and your satisfied that everything works, take the switch back downstairs and connect all of the keystones in the boxes to ports in the gigabit switch.  The order of connection with the gigabit switch won't matter.  When the switch is connected and powered up you should have gigabit capable ethernet throughout the house.  Realistically you will probably see approx 940 Mb/s max due to the ethernet overhead.  You will probably see less than unless the house ethernet cabling is actually Cat 6 cabling.  If you take a look at the ethernet cable jacket, you should see either Cat-5e or Cat 6 printed on the side of the cable.  That's worth noting so that you know what to expect in terms of max performance.  

 

I'm hoping that you will find that the cables and keystones are connected for gigabit ops.  If their only connected for 100 Mb/s, you would have to cut the offending keystones off of the cable and install a new keystone on the cable.  If the person who installed the keystones simply wrapped the other two wire pairs backwards on the cable, at the keystone ends, you might be able to take those two wire pairs and punch them down into the keystone.  I'd have to see a few pictures of those keystones to tell you what you should do in order to get the best performance out of the house ethernet cables. 

 

Note, there is a new generation of switches now on the market which have ports rated for 802.3bz.  Thats a new ethernet standard which will allow 2.5 and 5 Gb/s over the same cabling in for Cat 6 or higher, up to 10 Gb/s.  To take advantage of that the switch and its connected devices would need to run 802.3bz ports.  Thats coming.  Motherboards are now hitting the market with those ports, so, its a matter of time before 802.3bz ports become commonplace.  

 

Hope this helps.  You could go straight to connecting the basement keystones to the gigabit switch, but, if you didn't do any testing and ended up having data rate issues in different rooms, you would have to go back to test the cabling.  What is it they say, "You can pay me now, or pay me later".  

 

 



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Re: Ethernet wall jacks question

Thank you for the detailed and clear instructions
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Re: Ethernet wall jacks question

@jdf580 one thing that didn't occur to me last night, if you're only looking to use one ethernet port upstairs, what you would do is:

 

1.  Connect the modem's bottom ethernet port to the wallplate ethernet keystone using an ethernet cable. 

2.  Cross connect the green keystone in the bottom box downstairs with the appropriate keystone colour in either of those boxes using another ethernet cable.

3.  Connect the device upstairs to the desired keystone.  

 

If you know that the device has a gigabit ethernet port on it, then, in theory the connected port LED at the back of the modem should be flashing amber.  If its flashing green, then that whole circuit is only running 10/100 Mb/s.  So, if you do know that the device is gigabit capable, that means that some hunting is in order to determine the cause of the slow data rates.  In that case, you probably need an ethernet tester such as the Sperry tester that I pointed out  or something similar to it.  

 

The drawback to this is the length of cable that you end up running from the modem.  Ethernet specs are based on 100 metre runs.  That's probably longer that the run you might have, downstairs and back upstairs, but, you can probably expect some degradation in the top downstream data rates at the upstairs device end.  Depending on that that device is, you may or may not notice and slower data rates. 

 

So, you're probably better off running a gigabit switch to deal with the cable lengths, and to give you internet access thru all of the other ethernet ports in the home.  

 

The reason that I suggest using the modem's bottom ethernet port is due to the presence of the wifi antenna at the very top of the modem.  The modem has internal shielding to prevent any EMI from the wifi antenna, but, just the same, if you're only using one of the ports, might as well use the bottom port. 



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Re: Ethernet wall jacks question

in all honesty without making this too complicated, all you need to do really is to Finnish the Ethernet wiring in your house, simply terminate all the jacks to a patch panel in a central location, plug them into a gigabit switch, test them to make sure they are working and certified. And just back feed the Ethernet port from your ignite modem into ONE jack or the gigabit switch, and it will feed the "internet" into ALL the RJ45 jacks in your home. and it does not matter if rogers is your provider or not, this method will work for essentially ALL providers, the only difference is the modem. My old house had 8 Ethernet drops and my modem was upstairs in the master bedroom, i simply back fed the Ethernet port into ONE wall jack and it made the internet active in ALL my Ethernet jacks


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Re: Ethernet wall jacks question

Isn't that what I said above??  The jacks all look finished, but the question remains, are they finished for 100 Mb/s or 1 Gb/s and are they all finished correctly?  That takes testing to determine.