Can i have multiple wireless access points in my house?

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I've Been Around
Posts: 1

Can i have multiple wireless access points in my house?

Hello fellow users - I've been reading tons on here but here's my scenario:

My Hitron CGN3 is installed at the far end of my house, so wireless doesnt travel far.  I had a DLINK DIR-655 connected via an Ethernet run to the other end so i had wireless there but disconnected it to try in another spot, couldnt get it to work so simply put it back and after hours cant get it to connect to the Hitron to offer either wired or wireless where it was (wish i'd never touched it!).  Tried many posts around different configs over several days - and cant figure it out.

 

here's what i would like to do so please let me know if this is possible:  leave the CGN3 where it is, and run 2 cable runs to 2 different routers elsewhere in the house to provide wireless.  One doesnt seem to be sufficient.  Ive read about lots of people liking the Asus RT-AC68U - is this the best money can buy?  Im really frustrated wiht the DLINK so happy to upgrade to something way better.  Can i run 2 of them in different parts of the house?  Do i need to put the CGN3 in bridge mode, and can i do this if i need one of the ports for the Netgear WNR1000 supplied by Rogers for Home Monitoring? 

 

Also does Rogers offer something different/better than the CGN3 but with more ports? I also want to hook up a (wired) video cam set up and will need a port, but the 4 are already in use.  Life was easier in a smaller house!  Thanks in advance

Philg

 

 

 

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Retired Moderator RogersMichaelB
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Posts: 129

Re: Can i have multiple wireless access points in my house?

 

Hi @philg1 and welcome to the community.

 

I totally understand how it is when you’re trying to get something to your comfort level with no success. Smiley Sad

 

Is anyone in the community able to assist with this query?

 

@Datalink ? @Gdkitty ?

 

 

Resident Expert
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Posts: 6,049

Re: Can i have multiple wireless access points in my house?

Yep, soon.  Have a few items to attend to first.  This actually isn't a problem.  Just a matter of sorting out cabling and connectors.



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Posts: 13,875

Re: Can i have multiple wireless access points in my house?

Ok.  from the sounds of it, i am almost in the same secnario as you, same items, etc (as in internet, home monitoring, etc).

You can most definately have more than one access point.

 

Overall, GENERALLY doing bridge mode, is most recomended.. and the smart home apparently does support it..

BUT.. its a little tougher.. its harder for rogers to connect/manage it if they need to... requires one of your routers to be right there, etc.

 

You definately can have more than one though.. all comes down to what you need.. range/coverage.
Getting a BETTER quality one (like the 68u or similar) will definately have better coverage.. and may only need ONE... but wouldnt stop you from haveing more than one if needed.

 

Again for the rogers home monitoring.. i personally dont sugest bridging.

 

You would probably want a setup, similar to mine.
I have the CGN3.  Out of it, i have the rogers netgear for the home monitoring in port 1. 
Off port 3 and 4, i have wired runs, going out to two switches.. one with my game consoles, other at the basement office.

Port 2, runs out to my Access point.  (which is an asus N66U).

The N66U gives me generally enough coverage i dont need a 2nd.  (but prior to it, had a linksys which DIDNT have the coverage.. so ran TWO access points).

 

Overall, having LESS access points can be a good thing.  You then have less wireless to interfear potentially with each other.

 

From the sounds of it.. even having the CGN3 active on one side, and another active on the other should give more than enough coverage.

 

 



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Re: Can i have multiple wireless access points in my house?

Bigest thing on the OTHER routers/access points is setting them up correctly.

 

You would be best to HARD RESET them to factory defaults.

You would then want to wire connect to it, and log into the router.

You need to make sure the IP address is set to something in the range of your CGN3.
(eg. if the CGN3 is 192.168.0.1, set your router to 192.168.0.2)

 

Which router you use, can change the rest of the setup.

Routers like the ASUS ones, have an AP mode.  Where it turns off DHCP, firewall, etc. (which you dont want on).  And you connect into the WAN port.
Some others (likely like yours) dont have that mode.  So you need to manually turn off all the features.. and you need to plug the router into one of the LAN ports, not the WAN.

 

Wireless frequencies need to be taken into account, as to not have interfearance.

Generally you dont want to overalap.
My rogers home security one, is set to channel 11 (on the 2.4).

So you want to spread them out.. set another to 6, and another to 1.. and you shouldnt have overlap.

 

As for the wired camera.. you should be able to plug those in anywhere on the network.. into one of the other ports on the access point, etc, and it will work fine.
you can even add switches, etc if need be.



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Posts: 928

Re: Can i have multiple wireless access points in my house?

Some thoughts to go along with what everyone else said:

1. It is perfectly possible to do what you want to do. You can have 2-3 access points connected into a single wired Ethernet networks and it will work just fine, if you set it up right.

2. If one high-quality router (we love the Asus RT-AC68U here) can give you the range required, this will save you a lot of hassle.

3. You should be able to do this whether your CGN3 is in bridge or gateway mode. What matters is the configuration of the other access points. Save yourself some sanity and get devices that have an 'access point' mode like the Asus routers do. Stand-alone non-router access points are also an option, but those tend to cost more for lower performance, so probably not a great idea for home use. 

4. Be very careful with your 2.4GHz channel setup. Ideally, you'd want each access point to operate on a non-overlapping channel. This will require considerable tweaking with tools like inSSIDer. 

 



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 41

Re: Can i have multiple wireless access points in my house?

Leave the CGN3 where it is, and, in Gateway Mode. Use the CGN3 as your DHCP Server only. Turn WIFI off, on CGN3. 

 

Ideally, run CAT6 between the CGN3 and your AP's. Purchase AP's with external antennas. Keep your AP's out of closets, etc.  Use the AP's as layer two devices.  Don't route from the AP's. No need to. Let the CGN3 do the routing.

 

Either enter static IP on your AP's, or do IP Address Reservation for your AP's, on the CGN3. (you will see them on the CGN3 as connected devices. Keep track of the AP's MAC address, so you know what is what).  Implement one AP at a time.

 

Use same SSID's (#yourssid# for 2.4ghz and #yourssid-5G# for 5ghz). Select different channels (1,6,11 preferred) for 2.4ghz, and higher channels for 5ghz. This should allow for decent roaming in your home, depending of course, on distance between AP's. 

 

Considering what WIFI/AP devices you select, you should be able to get a good spread on the high channels for 5ghz.

  

Don't bridge..

 

Your Netgear device from Rogers should be good on the port it is currently on.

 

There is a big ASUS camp here, and they have good hardware. Netgear has equally good hardware. Depends on your budget and what your wireles clients are capable of - 802.11a/b/g/n/ac.

 

Most vendors now have free apps for smart phones which allow you to see what channels are being used in your location, plus other decent utilities, like WIFI Analytics. 

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Re: Can i have multiple wireless access points in my house?

There are a number of suggestions made so far which will no doubt gives you a fair amount of info to digest and decisions to make.  I ran a DIR-655 for many months as an access point at the other side of the house before replacing it with an Asus RT-AC68U.  No regrets at all in doing that .  Are there better routers, yes, a little more money, but it comes down to what your requirements are, how many wireless devices you use and what those devices do.  These routers are the next generation routers, capable of Multi-User Multi Input, Multi Output (handling numerous devices simultaneously instead of one at a time.) 

 

For the DIR-655, run a factory reset, then without connecting it to the internet, log into it using an ethernet connection, set it up with an IP address that is outside the Hitron IP address range, disable the DHCP so that the Hitron handles all of the LAN addressing, set up the wireless as required, save the settings and then power it down.  Connect it to the ethernet connection where you had it runing before, but this time connect the cable to one of the LAN ports so that the DIR-655 acts as an access point.  Power it up and you should be able to use it without any problem.  The stand-alone IP address will enable you to log into the router if you have to make any changes to the settings.  That is an old router, and if its an first version model, I believe its actually a Draft 802.11n device, whereas the n specification has been in an approved state since 2009.

 

Part of the puzzle in all of this is the cabling in the home, whether or not structured wiring is installed and whether or not its all completed in terms of connectors at the wallplates and downstairs at the structured wiring cabinet.  Structured wiring is a wire bundle consisting of 4 cables, two RG-6 cables for satellite or cable tv / internet / home phone, one Cat 5e cable for data and one Cat 3 (possibly another Cat 5e) for telephone.  If that is installed to every room, and completed, that gives you significant freedom to park the modem, routers, switches and other devices throughout the house where there is a connected wallplate available.   If you look behind a wallplate that has a cable connector, ethernet or telephone  jack installed you might see the other cables sitting behind the plate, unused.  If so, its possible to complete the installation, allowing you to park devices anywhere.  So, one of the questions is whether or not that cabling is currently installed? Can you have a look either behind a wallplate, or downstairs in the structured wiring cabinet where your telephone connection block is located and see if the remainder of the RG-6 cables and ethernet cables are present.

 

Lastly, for additional ports, you can connect a gigabit switch either directly to the modem, or to an ethernet cable elsewhere in the home in the event that the cabling is already installed.  And, you can install more than one switch if required.  The switches come in managed and unmanaged types and run from something like a 5 port to 24 or more ports.  What you install will depend on what you port requirements are.  Its just a matter of planning and sketching out what your network needs to look like and where it has to connect.

 

There are a number of people who can help so don't hesitate to ask if you need clarification on any point.



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Re: Can i have multiple wireless access points in my house?


@netwrks wrote:

 

Use same SSID's (#yourssid# for 2.4ghz and #yourssid-5G# for 5ghz). Select different channels (1,6,11 preferred) for 2.4ghz, and higher channels for 5ghz. This should allow for decent roaming in your home, depending of course, on distance between AP's. 

 

 Don't bridge..

 

Your Netgear device from Rogers should be good on the port it is currently on.

 

This brings up a good point..   I am on the fence with this one.

One one hand, yes, having the SAME SSID on both, technically SHOULD allow for easier roaming, where it is not changing SSIDs, etc.

Its not always clean though.. really all comes down to how well the two different devices talk to each other and are able to do the handoff.
I have run into cases, where it actually was quicker doing them seperately.

Personally i like having them named differently as well.. lets you more easily know WHAT one you are connected to at the time (so if you have droped the weaker further one for the closer stronger, etc).

 

----

As well, again i agree to NOT bridge and just do 1+ APs (or AP's + the built in wireless).

With the rogers home monitoring, it WILL work without running the rogers gateway.. it makes it a lot harder for them to try and connect to it if they need to make any changes to fix something with it... vs the way it is now.



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Posts: 348

Re: Can i have multiple wireless access points in my house?

One other thing that no one is mentioned is that you can get dedicated access points and use them connected, via cabling, to your main router/switch.  I have bought four Ubiquiti Unifi Access points for my large house.  These look like large smoke dectectors and are meant to be ceiling mounted - they use PoE for power and come with PoE injectors.  They cost just under $100 each.  The advantage of this is that all of the APs can be managed centrally using a web portal and you can see what Users are on your wifi network, how much data they are using, etc.  But it may not be worth the cost and effort for you.  They generally use the same SSID but since the multiple access points work together they will likely give you better switching amongst your access points as they can kick off a weak client to cause it to reconnect to a stronger AP.  The downside is that these are only 802.11a/b/g/n (no AC unless you pay up for a higher end unit) and only use 2.4GHz but that is fine for me.

 

Regarding needing more than four ports - you can buy a gigabit switch and plug that into one of the ports on your CGN3 or your router if you use the CGN3 in bridge mode.  Eight port switches are around $30 - or you can get much bigger if you need, like 16 or 24 ports.  10/100 switches are cheaper but you may want to keep everything on your network gigabit.