Can I use my wireless router?

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I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Can I use my wireless router?

Hello!

  By next month I want to switch my internet service from Start to Rogers as I want more speed for my gaming. I do have a great wireless router Asus RC RT88U that it has 8 Ethernet ports and I do have lots of devices to connect.  Rogers rokect wifi modem is built in wired and wireless as well but I don't trust that modem to give me good connection either wired or wirless and I want to use my Asus for wired and wireless connecction. Is that possible to do? Can I disable Rogers wifi and use my Asus to get wireless connection or wired? Thanks for any help.

 

Sincerely,

Zia.

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Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 1,059

Re: Can I use my wireless router?

Hello @ZIA,

 

Yes, you can put our modem in bridge mode and use your own router. However, we do not offer any troubleshooting support for 3rd party routers. It would be up to you to configure it.

 

RogersCorey

I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Re: Can I use my wireless router?

Thanks for your reply. You gave peace of mind and actually I Rogers does gives details regarding this issue and its simple process as I read the article.Smiley Happy

I'm a Reliable Contributor
Posts: 338

Re: Can I use my wireless router?

I currently have the 3552 modem on the gigabit plan and was considering getting a seperate router for stronger wifi in the house.  If I set the modem into bridge mode and use a seperate router, will it cause my internet speed to drop?  I recall people mentioned this in the past on the forum but am not sure if this is still an issue.

 

Thanks

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 13,921

Re: Can I use my wireless router?

As long as the router that you get, supports the speeds that your plan has.

EG:  Say you are on the 250 plan..  if you get a router with a 10/100 wan port.. well your going to stop at 100 max.

 

When you start going up to the 1gb plan, getting 1gb period may be stretching it period over anything at one time (but combined no issues)



I've Been Around
Posts: 1

Re: Can I use my wireless router?

Can someone in my house use their own router and use my wifi?

 

I live upstairs and someone rents the basement. Is it possible for them to plug in their own router and use my wifi???

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 13,921

Re: Can I use my wireless router?

Technically, yes.
They could plug into your modem, and it would work on its own.  Depending on your setup, they could end up in a double firewall scenario, etc.

Really though, if its a proper rental, this sort of falls under that they are supposed to have their 'own' account, as you are not supposed to share in this way.  
More than anything its also for the users protection.  ANYTHING that person did on your internet, you could be accountable for.  They download a bunch of illegal downloaded movies and the studio decides to go after the person who downloaded it?  It would fall on the account owner.



Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,111

Re: Can I use my wireless router?

@elishaawilsonn at this point I'm not sure that I entirely understand what your question is.  The principal question is where is your modem located?  If its upstairs, that prevents anyone else from accessing the modem.  If the modem is upstairs and only connected to your computer or router for example, then there is no one else who can access the modem or router ports and plug into your network.  The only potential access would be thru hacking the WPS code, if in fact WPS was enabled in the wifi settings of the modem.  

 

If your modem was connected to a house ethernet port to allow internet access in any of the rooms upstairs, then there is a definite possibility of someone connecting to that network by using a downstairs ethernet port.  That's a matter of the physical connections to a gigabit switch which has to be located where all of the house ethernet cabling converges.  Even with that possibility of someone else accessing the ethernet network, you can lock them out by using MAC address filtering in the modem.  That works until someone decides to spoof a legitimate MAC address for the purpose of accessing the network.  Best advice in this case would be to disconnect the modem or router from the house ethernet ports.  

 

In terms of accessing the your wifi network, yes its possible if WPS is enabled in your modem or router.  WPS is  simple shortcut which allows devices to access your network.  Although it requires a physical action to do this, at the modem or router and at the device, the WPS code itself is not secure and hasn't been secure for many years.  It can be hacked with the right pc/laptop application.  For that reason, WPS should be disabled for both the 2.4 and 5 Ghz networks.  

 

If you log into your modem or router, and check the connected devices you should be able to account for every connected device.  If you determine that there are more devices connected to the modem or router than you can account for, then its definitely possible that someone is accessing your wifi network.  For example, turn off all of your mobile devices and use one ethernet connected device to access the modem or router.  Reboot the modem or router and then check for connected devices.  You should only see that one single ethernet connected device.  

 

To do this in the modem, assuming that you have one of the black Hitron CGN3xxxx modem, or the white Hitron CODA-4582 modem, log into the modem and navigate to the BASIC .... LAN SETUP tab.  at the bottom of the page, select "Show" to see the connected devices.  Give that maybe as much as 5 minutes to completely fill in.  It should show all of the ethernet and wifi connected devices from what I remember.  

 

If you use your own router, then you will have to determine how to show what ethernet and wifi devices are connected to the router.  

 

For your wifi settings, please have a look at the following post, specifically the wifi settings for both 2.4 and 5 Ghz networks.  

 

https://communityforums.rogers.com/t5/Internet/slow-wifi/m-p/429489#M54216

 

Please ensure that WPS is disabled for both the 2.4 and 5 Ghz networks.  Your wifi network name and passwords should use long random character strings.  The SSID, or network name is 32 characters long.  Since one very very rarely has to enter that SSID into a device, use the entire field.  Fill it with completely random characters, numbers and special characters.  Your network name shouldn't be able to identify you or your home.   The passphrase is 63 or 64 characters long depending on what type of character strings you use.  Personal opinion, fill that as well using random characters, numbers and special characters as well.  Yup, that's a pain when it comes to entering that string into a mobile device, but, you probably don't change that string very often anyways.  The other approach is to use a phrase of some type that means something to you.  It should be 25 characters long at a minimum, preferably longer.   Something like, "MYflufflycatwasbornonsunday11may2014andheisverycute!!!", without the quotation marks of course.  So, something that makes sense to you and is easy (easier) to remember should do the job.  

 

Ok, so why bother with that?  Simple wifi network names and passphrases can be easily hacked.  There are precomputed hacking tables available on the internet which combine network names and passphrases from stolen files that contain data such as that, and also from lists of words found in dictionaries.  By using random character strings in the SSID (network name) and passphrase fields, that will prevent the use of those precomputed tables. That doesn't mean that wifi networks are totally secure, as they can be hacked using brute force attacks, but, that takes a considerable amount of effort beyond using the precomputed tables.  The goal here is to make your network secure, to the point where there are other, easier targets for any neighbourhood hacker who is looking for a network to hack.   

 

With:

1.  No access to your modem or router:

2.  No access or very limited access to the modem or router ethernet ports: and

3.  Long random wifi strings for the SSID and passphrase and WPS disabled in the wifi settings.

 

Your network should be secure and not allow anyone else from accessing it.  

 

Hope this answers the question.  Please let us know if you have any other questions.