CGN2 (or) CGN3 in Bridge mode?

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Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 13,921

Re: CGN2 (or) CGN3 in Bridge mode?

The CGN3 NAT is pretty strict, as you have found out with the XBOXes.

Bridging and using a 3rd party, should help with this as you have planned.

Now, to the issue you are having with the DIR-810L.
The CGN3 had a bug, in which any device which was only 10/100 wired connections (which the 810L is, suprisingly since its an AC routers), only links at about 1/2 duplex.. so limits the speed down quite a bit.

 

If you just received it.. give it a few days, the newer firmware should be pushed out to it.. which will FIX that issue and your speeds SHOULD improve.



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 23

Re: CGN2 (or) CGN3 in Bridge mode?

Greetings,

 

I have this Hitron CGN3ACSMR,   I have turned off all wireless and both 2.4g and 5g icons on the hitron turned off.

I then set the modem to bridge mode so I can use my existing router setup.  It works but now the 2.4g is on?  Why?

I disconnectede my router and reconnected my pc to the hitron and can nolonger login via 192.168.0.1.  I have to reset the hitron just to log back in.  So how do I keep the hitron in bridge mode and keep all the wireless icons off?

Also is it possible to place it standby mode when it is not in use?  The manual I have makes no mention of standby or bridge mode.

 

Thank you

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,111

Re: CGN2 (or) CGN3 in Bridge mode?

Ok, well, first things first.  Log into the modem when its in Gateway mode and navigate to WIRELESS.... WPS and SECURITY. There should be two sub tabs on that page for 2.4 and 5 Ghz networks. For each tab, Change the Security Mode to WPA-2, Encrypt Mode to AES and fill the Pass Phrase to the maximum with random characters and numbers. The CGN3 series doesn't use certain characters, so, sticking to letters and numbers is fine, but fill the entire pass phrase window. That's actually 62 or 63 characters depending on what you use. Save the settings as you do each tab.

Next step is to navigate to WIRELESS.... BASIC SETTINGS. There are two sub tabs on that page for 2.4 and 5 Ghz networks. Change the network name for both networks. Fill the window to the max with random letters and numbers. This is 32 characters in length. Then turn off everything on that tab, with the "Wireless Enabled" as the last item. Save the changes. Repeat the same for the other network tab and save the changes.

Why do this?

1. There is a bug in the firmware that causes one or both wifi transmit LEDs to illuminate when the modem is switched to Bridge mode. Hopefully, by killing both networks before you switch to Bridge mode, those LEDs will remain unlit and reduce any possible confusion. Bridge mode, wifi running, huh???  The modem does not have any routing, wifi, or firewall capabilities when its in Bridge mode, despite the presence of one or both illuminated wifi LEDs at the front of the modem.

2. Rogers has been running scans for modems with default wifi network names and pass phrases and sending emails or using browser injection reminding you to change the names and passphrases. The scan does not discriminate between modems in Gateway mode, which could have the wifi networks in operation, and those modems in Bridge mode where wifi operation from the modem is not possible. So, changing the names and passphrases will do away with the nagging nanny scan.

 

Ok, with that done, navigate to BASIC.... GATEWAY FUNCTION and disable the Residential Gateway Function.   Save the changes so that the modem reboots back into Bridge mode. Done.  Hopefully, this time around the LEDs will not be illuminated.  If they are, you could try a factory reset buy using the factory reset button at the back of the modem.  Hold that down for 30 seconds and release it to reset everything back to default values and then after it reboots, go thru the above steps again.  Also change the password so that it is something different from the default "password".  Then, kick the modem back into Bridge mode again.

 

After the modem is running in Bridge mode, and the router is connected and running, you can log into the modem, thru your own router by using 192.168.100.1 as the local IP address for the modem's login page.  Using that address you can check on the signal levels and also kick the modem back into Gateway mode by re-enabling the Residential Gateway Function thru the user interface. 

 

That address is used when the modem is in Bridge mode, but, it can also be used when the modem is in Gateway mode and you are using a direct connection to the modem.  That is in addition to the normally used 192.168.0.1

 

Standby mode.  Nope, there isn't a standby mode.  You would either have to unplug the power, or connect the power supply to an extension cord that has a built in switch.  Using a cord with a switch is handy if you want to be able to regularly shut down the modem, or if you want to run a power reset. 

 

 



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 23

Re: CGN2 (or) CGN3 in Bridge mode?

Looking good so far, thank you.  Wifi light still off.

 

Datasheet I have says 9W standby,  16W operation.  And full manual I downloaded

makes no mention of standby mode.  Oh well, I can always try the powerswitch

ideal  thanks again

I've Been Around
Posts: 1

Re: CGN2 (or) CGN3 in Bridge mode?

Hello all! I need some advice

 

I have a hitron cgn3 which I tried to run in bridge mode. When I used my dlink 880l, I felt like my internet is slower.

Is there anything that I have to change in my router? Do I need to set the router to brigde mode as well?

 

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 13,921

Re: CGN2 (or) CGN3 in Bridge mode?

As long as you have the CGN3 in proper breidge mode, there shouldnt be anything else you need to do on the router end.

The router should be more than capable of handling enough speeds, etc.

 

 

The big test would be to compare running a WIRED speed test while the CGN3 is in gateway mode, and then do the same wired test (to the same speedtest server) while with the other router in place while bridged.


Speed wise, the CGN3 should be just fine in bridged.. the only thing that i THINK may be still present, there are some TINY latency spikes to the CGN3 itself.. but that shouldnt effect speed overall.



Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,111

Re: CGN2 (or) CGN3 in Bridge mode?

As Gdkitty indicated, your ethernet test speed results should be the same when the modem is in Gateway mode versus when the modem is in Bridge mode and the router is in full router mode.  The one item to check is the port to port connection rates.  The connected port LED at the back of the modem should be amber in colour indicating a 1 Gb/s connection rate.  As both devices have 10/100/1000 Mb/s ports, with a good cable, that port LED should be amber.  Green would indicate a 10/100 Mb/s connection rate.  The green colour would also indicate that the connecting ethernet cable is damaged in some fashion to the point that its not supporting 1 Gb/s rates, or, that the cable is not connecting properly at either or both ends.  If you are running 100 Mb/s or higher for your internet plan, that 100 Mb/s would cap the throughput.  You wouldn't see the effect of the Speedboost kicking in for a 100 Mb/s plan, and if you were running the 250 Mb/s plan you would definitely notice the slower data rates.

 

For the router itself, have a look at the current firmware and the current version on the support page.  If you haven't updated the router recently, it would be a good plan to install the newer firmware. 

 

http://support.dlink.ca/ProductInfo.aspx?m=DIR-880L

 

If you use QOS or traffic monitoring of any type, disable them and see if there is an improvement in the data rates.  Also go thru the modem user pages and disable anything that is enabled but is not being used by you.  Any function that you use has a cost, in terms of CPU processing time, and with speeds at or over 100 Mb/s that can result in an observable reduction in data throughput.  You would want to ensure that the firewall and Stateful Packet Inspection (SPI)  are up and running to protect your network.  Anything else would have to be carefully considered if you were seeing slower data rates on your speedtests.