Bridge Mode Setup Guide

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Datalink
Resident Expert
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Posts: 7,215

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Where are you seeing those network as still being available, and by that I'm assuming that you can see the "Hitron" modem as being the host device, even though its not broadcasting a wifi network.  I think the problem here is that any device that you have running that was connected to the modem previously, still has the modem's network parameters stored.  So, if you restart the device, it should usually kick over to the router, or as I indicated above, you might have to delete or forget the network, and then connect the device to the router, which will result in the network parameters being stored with the router as the host device.  

 

As a check, if you log into the router, you should see that its WAN IP address should be a 174.xxx.xxx.xxx address and not a 192.168.0.xxs address.  If the router shows as having a 192.168.0.xxx WAN IP address, that indicates that the modem is still running in Gateway mode, in which case it should respond to 192.168.0.1 as a log in address. 

 

If that is the case, where the modem is still in Gateway mode, you can connect a pc to any of the modem's LAN ports, log in to the modem using 192.168.0.1 and disable the BASIC .... GATEWAY FUNCTION .... Residential Gateway Function.  Save the settings and the modem should then reboot into Bridge mode.  At the same time, restart the router so that it end up with its correct WAN IP address.  Disconnect the pc from the modem and connect it to the router. 



RobHud
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 12

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Thank you so much. I will try that. I am still seeing 192.xxx as the address so I will see if that fixes it.
Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,215

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Key point, after you disable the BASIC .... GATEWAY FUNCTION .... Residential Gateway Function, Save the changes, which will initiate the reboot into Bridge mode. 

 

At the same time, restart/reboot the router, and disconnect the pc from the modem.  Reconnect the pc to the router.



RobHud
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 12

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Hello.  So i tried unplugging and replugging the modem and router and then accessing the admin page.  neither 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.100.1 will load the page.  Any suggestions? 

 

Thank you

 

Robyne

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,215

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

@RobHud , ok, its time for a little brute force and ignorance, in the form of modem factory reset.  Push the recessed reset button at the back of the modem for 30 seconds.  That will initiate the factory reset and reboot the modem back into Gateway mode.  When that is underway, connect a pc to the modem.  When the modem reboot is complete, you will have to start setting the modem up again, using 192.168.0.1, but, realistically, you only have to set the modem's password, which is the same as the wifi passphrase.  So, on the initial setup from what I remember, you have to enter the wifi network name and passphrase (modem password).  Once that is done, you can, if you prefer, shut down the wifi networks, then kick the modem into Bridge mode by disabling the BASIC .... GATEWAY FUNCTION .... Residential Gateway Function.  Save the setting to initiate the reboot into Bridge mode. 

 

Fwiw, whenever the modem won't respond to what I'm trying to do, first step is a restart/reboot.  I'll pull the power wait for a few seconds and plug the modem back in again.  If the modem is still misbehaving, the next step is a factory reset.  I don't have the patience to wait around for it, so, its either behave, or, you're getting nuked.  

 

Note that when the modem reboots, it should run a firmware version check, and if there is a newer version available, it will download and update to the next version.  So, if the modem appears to be taking longer to restart, it might be running a firmware update.  There is a reboot scheduled into the firmware update, so, if you see the modem rebooting on its own again, don't be surprised.  Let the modem finish the update.  It will come to an end 🙂



RobHud
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 12

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

THANK YOU SO MUCH!  I did the steps you suggested and now was able to log in and turn the WIFI off before I put it in bridge mode.  Your instructions were fantastic and very easy to follow.  Now if only you could magically fix my dropping connection from Rogers you would be a god 🙂

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,215

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

@RobHud, still working on walking on water:)  Doesn't seem to be progressing too far for some reason.

 

We can have a look at the signal levels and look for packet loss, both of which could point to an external cable and/or connector issue. 

 

Can you log into the modem and take note of the Software (firmware) version that is shown on the STATUS page when you log into the modem.  Please post the firmware version.  By now it should be a 7.x version. 

 

Note that if the modem runs long enough with that version loaded, it will become unresponsive to log in attempts.  In that case, pull the power cord from the wall socket, wait 10 to 15 seconds and plug it back in.  After the restart you should be able to log into the modem using 192.168.100.1, using a pc or laptop connected to the router.  

 

When you've been able to log into the modem and take note of the firmware version, navigate to the STATUS .... DOCSIS WAN tab, copy the signal level data and post that in new post.  To do that, park the mouse curser at the front of the "Downstream Overview" line, hole the left mouse button down and drag it all the way down to the bottom right hand corner of the bottom OFDM/OFDMA Overview section.  When that area has been selected, right click .... Copy.  Then in a new post, right click .... Paste.   The table should paste into a post as it appears in the modems user interface.   

 

Its possible to have cable issues even if the signal levels look ok in that data.  In that case, the disconnects happen fast enough that the modem's data won't catch it.  Its possible that the results of the disconnect can show up in the DOCSIS EVENT log, in the form of MDD disconnects plus other disconnect caused logged events.  To detect that, users can run a ping test to the Cable Modem Termination System (CMTS).  The cable path from modem to CMTS is as follows:

 

Modem --->  splitter ---> external demarcation ---> local tap ---> neighbourhood node ---> CMTS

 

1.  The path from the modem to the neighbourhood node is via cable. 

2.  The path from the neighbourhood node to CMTS is via fibre optic cable

3.  The external demarcation point is located on an external wall of your home and contains a cable ground and the cable ends that run from inside the house and the connected end from the local tap

4.  The local tap is either located at a nearby pedestal which is about waist high, or, is on a nearby utility pole, depending on the type of cabling you have in your neighbourhood, which is either underground or overhead, utility pole to utility pole. 

 

Usually, if there is a problem with disconnects, the cause is degradation of the external cable run from the demarcation point to the local tap.  That also includes the connectors on that cable.  Now, its also possible that there are issues further upstream between the local tap and the neighbourhood node.  That includes issues with the cable run, any amplifiers on the cable or potentially with noise issues if someone has a device connected to their cable system that shouldn't be connected.  Intermittent issues can be a complete pain to locate and fix, so, persistence is the key. 

 

 

To check for potential cable issues that cause disconnects, and to quantify the packet loss from the house to the CMTS, run a ping test to the CMTS.  Note that we're only looking to quantify the packet losses.  With the 4582 modem, you will see high time returns, running up to 100 ms or so.  Thats due to a firmware change that was introduced in a previous version, long ago  The only effect is on the return time from the CMTS, and it doesn't affect any other return time from a target beyond the CMTS.  So, ignore the return times shown in this test. 

 

To run the ping test, first run a command line trace to anywhere, google for example:

 

tracert -4 www.google.com

 

The first IP will be the router, the second IP address will be the CMTS.  The modem and neighbourhood node will not show up in the trace.  The modem won't show up as its in Bridge mode.   The neighbourhood node will never show up in the trace.

 

Ping the CMTS for at least an hour.  To do that, use:

 

ping -n 3600 xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx        where xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx is the 2nd hop IP address.  

 

To run a longer test, simply increase the "3600" number.  Windows pings 1 ping every second, so, 3600 pings will take an hour to complete after which the test will terminate.  You can also run an indefinite test using:

 

ping -t xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx           where xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx is the 2nd hop IP address

 

Use Ctrl c to terminate the test.  

 

When the test is done, copy the bottom results and paste them in a message back to me.  To do that, simply select the bottom results area in the command box.  Hold the left button down on your mouse when it positioned at the front end of the first results line, and drag down to highlight or select all of the results line.  Use Ctrl c to copy them to the clipboard and then Ctrl v or right click ..... Paste to dump the data into a post or other document.  

 

So, looking at the signal levels and the results of a ping test will hopefully point us in the right direction.  

 

Your mission, if you decide to accept it .........

 

Edit:  Note that the ping test needs to run from an ethernet connected desktop or laptop.  Thats to ensure that any wifi issues don't alter what should be a connected cable test, end to end. 



RobHud
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 12

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

I will try that for sure. Thank you so much
Just to clarify I should run the ping test with the ethernet cable connected to my bridge mode Roger's modem or my purchased router?
Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,215

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Run the test with the pc connected to the router via ethernet.  No doubt if you report bad results, the Tier 1 tech will blame the router.  But, in reality, if the cable and/or its connectors have deteriorated to the point where you're seeing disconnects, it doesn't matter how you run the test, modem in Gateway mode, connected to the modem, or, modem Bridge mode, connected to the router.  The cable doesn't care what's connected. 

 

For now, run the test as your network is configured with the modem in Bridge mode and lets see what the results show.  If you happen to have an application on hand to run a faster ping test, go ahead and use that.  As Windows only runs 1 ping per second, it takes time to end up with a meaningful result.  



RobHud
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 12

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Sorry to bother you.  I am a bit unsure where I run the test?  Is it a program I install to use or do I type something in the command box?  Also where do I find the 2nd IP address?  Mine are listed as IP, Default Gateway, Primary DNS and Secondary DNS.  Thank you for the guideance!

 

tracert -4 www.google.com

 

The first IP will be the router, the second IP address will be the CMTS.  The modem and neighbourhood node will not show up in the trace.  The modem won't show up as its in Bridge mode.   The neighbourhood node will never show up in the trace.

 

Ping the CMTS for at least an hour.  To do that, use:

 

ping -n 3600 xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx        where xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx is the 2nd hop IP address.  

 

To run a longer test, simply increase the "3600" number.  Windows pings 1 ping every second, so, 3600 pings will take an hour to complete after which the test will terminate.  You can also run an indefinite test using:

 

ping -t xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx           where xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx is the 2nd hop IP address